New Guinea/Papuan Ts?

MainMann

Arachnosquire
Joined
Feb 25, 2019
Messages
130
Hello!
Can anyone give me any suggestions on any papuan Ts that are available in the hobby? I'm planning to have a collection of Indonesian Ts, and as for the other major islands, i already have a T in mind.

Thank you in advance, Maman
 

EtienneN

Arachnonovelist-musician-artist
Arachnosupporter
Joined
Jul 15, 2017
Messages
936
I'm not aware of any Ts from Papua New Guinea. My guess is that there might be one over there it is undiscovered to science, but maybe not because as far as I'm aware New Zealand has no tarantulas so Papua New Guinea might be the same way. If I recall correctly, there might be some mygalomorphs on the New Guinea island but that's about it. It just so happens that not every country has its own species of tarantula. ;)
 

TownesVanZandt

Arachnoprince
Joined
May 12, 2015
Messages
1,019
I'm not aware of any Ts from Papua New Guinea. My guess is that there might be one over there it is undiscovered to science, but maybe not because as far as I'm aware New Zealand has no tarantulas so Papua New Guinea might be the same way. If I recall correctly, there might be some mygalomorphs on the New Guinea island but that's about it. It just so happens that not every country has its own species of tarantula. ;)
There is definitely Ts at Papua New Guinea (Selenocosmia sp. at least, but probably more as well).
 

Vanisher

Arachnoking
Old Timer
Joined
Oct 2, 2004
Messages
2,167
Yes, there are Selenocosmia speicies on Papua new guninea. Selenocosmia papuana and some more speicies? S dichromata, is that one from Papua new guinea? I think do?
 

EtienneN

Arachnonovelist-musician-artist
Arachnosupporter
Joined
Jul 15, 2017
Messages
936
Interesting. Weird how some islands have Ts and some don't. I guess it has to do with when and how fast the land masses broke up.
 

Vanisher

Arachnoking
Old Timer
Joined
Oct 2, 2004
Messages
2,167
Or they can be introduced with birds or similair. It is commen with fishes. Diffrent fishspeicies indroduced to new water with birds
 

TownesVanZandt

Arachnoprince
Joined
May 12, 2015
Messages
1,019
Interesting. Weird how some islands have Ts and some don't. I guess it has to do with when and how fast the land masses broke up.
In the case of New Zealand climate is also a factor. They have a temperate climate with rather chilly winters so I doubt Ts could live there.
 

Dennis Nedry

Arachnodemon
Joined
Oct 21, 2017
Messages
673
In the case of New Zealand climate is also a factor. They have a temperate climate with rather chilly winters so I doubt Ts could live there.
I’d say that would depend on the species and how well adapted they are to the cold, there are tarantulas that live in environments that commonly see snow in the wild so I guess anything could happen
 

EtienneN

Arachnonovelist-musician-artist
Arachnosupporter
Joined
Jul 15, 2017
Messages
936
Maybe theres a species of tarantula in NZ and nobody knows it yet. :smug::D
 

viper69

ArachnoGod
Old Timer
Joined
Dec 8, 2006
Messages
9,217
Or they can be introduced with birds or similair. It is commen with fishes. Diffrent fishspeicies indroduced to new water with birds

It is believed by some scientists that birds helped spread Avics across S. America
 

MainMann

Arachnosquire
Joined
Feb 25, 2019
Messages
130
Yeah I've seen and read that there's a handful of Selenocosmia there, one particularly beautiful one is the "New Guinea Rust brown" which i forgot the scientific name of, S. ardnsti or something. How about other genera? Are there any other genera that live in papua?
 

AphonopelmaTX

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
May 7, 2004
Messages
1,229
Here is a list of species located in New Guinea or Papua New New Guinea. Data from the World Spider Catalog (2019). Can't say if any are in the hobby though.

Orphnaecus dichromatus: New Guinea
Phlogiellus bicolor: Papua New Guinea (New Britain)
Selenocosmia arndsti: New Guinea
Selenocosmia compta: New Guinea
Selenocosmia hirtipes: Indonesia (Moluccas), New Guinea
Selenocosmia honesta: New Guinea
Selenocosmia lanceolata: New Guinea
Selenocosmia lanipes: Indonesia (Moluccas), New Guinea
Selenocosmia mittmannae: New Guinea
Selenocosmia papuana: New Guinea
Selenocosmia similis: New Guinea
Selenocosmia strenua: Australia (Queensland), New Guinea
Selenocosmia strubelli: Indonesia (Java, Moluccas) or New Guinea
Selenocosmia valida: New Guinea
 

Patherophis

Arachnobaron
Joined
May 24, 2017
Messages
360
New Guinea is very interesting when it comes to zoogeography. It has extremely rich fauna, e.g. IRRC there is almost as many endemic mammal species in New Guinea alone, as in rest of region combined (meaning Australia, New Zealand, Wallacea, Polynesia and Hawaii). It is part of Continental australian subregion. It used to be connected with Australia. Many typical australian animals like echidnas, kangoroos, cassowaries and so on live there.

S. arndsti is very nice spider and some members here do have them.
 
Last edited:

MainMann

Arachnosquire
Joined
Feb 25, 2019
Messages
130
Here is a list of species located in New Guinea or Papua New New Guinea. Data from the World Spider Catalog (2019). Can't say if any are in the hobby though.

Orphnaecus dichromatus: New Guinea
Phlogiellus bicolor: Papua New Guinea (New Britain)
Selenocosmia arndsti: New Guinea
Selenocosmia compta: New Guinea
Selenocosmia hirtipes: Indonesia (Moluccas), New Guinea
Selenocosmia honesta: New Guinea
Selenocosmia lanceolata: New Guinea
Selenocosmia lanipes: Indonesia (Moluccas), New Guinea
Selenocosmia mittmannae: New Guinea
Selenocosmia papuana: New Guinea
Selenocosmia similis: New Guinea
Selenocosmia strenua: Australia (Queensland), New Guinea
Selenocosmia strubelli: Indonesia (Java, Moluccas) or New Guinea
Selenocosmia valida: New Guinea
Thank youuuu!!!! Will def be asking about on these species! Suuuper helpful dude!!! Much love from indonesia!

New Guinea is very interesting when it comes to zoogeography. It has extremely rich fauna, e.g. IRRC there is almost as many endemic mammal species in New Guinea alone, as in rest of region combined (meaning Australia, New Zealand, Wallacea, Polynesia and Hawaii). It is part of Continental australian subregion. It used to be connected with Australia. Many typical australian animals like echidnas, kangoroos, cassowaries and so on live there.

S. arndsti is very nice spider and some members here do have them.
Ikr! It's one of the last truly "untouched" parts of the earth! The creatures there are all especially interesting!
 
Last edited by a moderator:

korg

Arachnobaron
Joined
Feb 24, 2013
Messages
513
It is believed by some scientists that birds helped spread Avics across S. America
How exactly does this work? A bird is trying to eat a tarantula and it ends up carrying it across water and then the tarantula escapes?
 

EtienneN

Arachnonovelist-musician-artist
Arachnosupporter
Joined
Jul 15, 2017
Messages
936
How exactly does this work? A bird is trying to eat a tarantula and it ends up carrying it across water and then the tarantula escapes?
I'm pretty sure it's a matter of tiny spiderlings hitching a ride on a bird's back or neck feathers. ;)
 

viper69

ArachnoGod
Old Timer
Joined
Dec 8, 2006
Messages
9,217
How exactly does this work? A bird is trying to eat a tarantula and it ends up carrying it across water and then the tarantula escapes?
See EtienneN's response. There's data to support this hypothesis I mentioned from what I learned from scientists. It's an interesting theory.

I'd have to find the email.
 
Top