Neoholothele incei communal FAIL :/

BobBarley

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My communal of Neoholothele incei experienced a cannibalism today. I originally had 5 but I separated one from the communal and that one promptly died because I let its enclosure dry out too quickly. I had just rehoused the communal of 4 into a bigger cage about a week ago. I found a dead body today. :/ I quickly rehoused each one so they are now in their separate enclosures. I believe the cannibalistic behavior was brought on because they specimens are almost adults at 1.5-2".

In summary, this is not a communal species. If you want to do a communal, look into Monocentropus balfouri.
 

nicodimus22

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Sorry for your loss. Maybe someone else will read this post in the next few years and it will prevent them from trying it, saving the lives of some Ts out there.
 

The Grym Reaper

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I'm sure I read somewhere that these can only be kept communally up until they hit juvenile/subadult sizes, your experience would seem to back that up somewhat.

In any case, I'm sorry for your loss.
 

Ellenantula

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Sorry this happened. I guess they showed grownup tendencies sooner than expected.
Anyway, very sad way to lose 2 Ts. :(
 

BobBarley

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Oh well, the death was pretty expected. I knew what I was risking when I tried this experiment, but it had been going so well for so long.
 

KezyGLA

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Greedy little things. Sorry to hesr of this. :(

This species along with other "thele" needs a lot if room. They live nearby but not as close quarters as balfouri.

They are s beautiful spider and web is lovely. I hope you can get another setup soon
 

Matttoadman

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I wonder if it was the change in environment? They had probably grown to tolerate each other originally. However, removing one and rehousing created a new stressful situation. I wonder if any "communal" situations remain after a rehousing?
 

mconnachan

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Oh well, the death was pretty expected. I knew what I was risking when I tried this experiment, but it had been going so well for so long.
Sorry to hear of your losses, how long did they live communally, just so you know if English isn't your mother tongue they live in a "commune", hope the three that have been re - housed live a long happy life, M. Balfouri do well in a communal set - up so do P. Regalis.
 

14pokies

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I've seen them in communal enclosures, I'm just telling you what I've seen with my own eyes, if you know differently then please enlighten me, rather than saying "No they don't..."
It's a common myth that poecs are communal because sometimes they will tolerate each other for short periods of time..

Even as slings when they are most tolerant of each other individuals out compete each other for food and eventually end up preying on each other.

If you put more than one poec in the same enclosure for long enough you will end up with just one big fat one. In nature disputes over territory can be settled by one of the Tarantulas choosing to retreat.. Lock them in a cage and there is only one way to settle the issue.

As far as me enlightening you it's not my job. Normally I don't mind but this is a busy month for me..We have a search function if you think I'm feeding you BS lace up your boots and do some independent research ;)..
 

MetalMan2004

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It's a common myth that poecs are communal because sometimes they will tolerate each other for short periods of time..

Even as slings when they are most tolerant of each other individuals out compete each other for food and eventually end up preying on each other.

If you put more than one poec in the same enclosure for long enough you will end up with just one big fat one. In nature disputes over territory can be settled by one of the Tarantulas choosing to retreat.. Lock them in a cage and there is only one way to settle the issue.

As far as me enlightening you it's not my job. Normally I don't mind but this is a busy month for me..We have a search function if you think I'm feeding you BS lace up your boots and do some independent research ;)..
"I don't have time to support my own point" is not the best argument I've seen around here...

As for lacing up the boots, a quick google and youtube search brings up LOTS of regalis communals, some years old. They aren't without their losses, but to think there will be zero losses in any communal is more than optimistic.

I don't have firsthand experience so all I have to go on so far are firsthand conflicting accounts between 14pokies and mconnachan and these google and youtube searches.
 

mconnachan

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It's a common myth that poecs are communal because sometimes they will tolerate each other for short periods of time..

Even as slings when they are most tolerant of each other individuals out compete each other for food and eventually end up preying on each other.

If you put more than one poec in the same enclosure for long enough you will end up with just one big fat one. In nature disputes over territory can be settled by one of the Tarantulas choosing to retreat.. Lock them in a cage and there is only one way to settle the issue.

As far as me enlightening you it's not my job. Normally I don't mind but this is a busy month for me..We have a search function if you think I'm feeding you BS lace up your boots and do some independent research ;)..
I don't think your feeding me bull, I'm interested, that's why I'm on AB, as for "enlightening" me, it was only a question without being rude or argumentative, @14pokies , I've posted what I think is correct.
 

mconnachan

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As far as me enlightening you it's not my job. Normally I don't mind but this is a busy month for me..We have a search function if you think I'm feeding you BS lace up your boots and do some independent research ;).
My boots are well laced thank you, I have researched the topic and have come to the conclusion that certain sp. can and do live communally, including P. Regalis. I think we'll have to agree to disagree, as @MetalMan2004 said that's not a great way to put your point across.
"I don't have time to support my own point" is not the best argument I've seen around here...
 

Leila

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@BobBarley, sorry to hear that things went poorly with the commune. I know you established the commune with full knowledge that its results might be undesirable. Nevertheless, it sucks to lose Ts.

P.S. I still adore that video you posted a while back in which that one N. incei sling was molting with its sibling standing very near by. :cat:
 

14pokies

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"I don't have time to support my own point" is not the best argument I've seen around here...
Well I did kind of make it clear that I didn't feel it was my responsibility to tell him why they dont work.. iE the referral to the search function :astonished:..

It's never as cut and dry as yes they do or no they don't and it's always debated in nauseam.. I don't have the time or patience for that Crap on a good day! Lol. Somone loosing 10 Ts in order to find 2 that will cohab with each other hardly qualifys them as a communal species..
 

Ellenantula

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Sorry OPs communal failed, but I gotta go with @14pokies here. There are plenty of threads here showing failed communal setups, failed 'divider' tanks, etc..
No reason any one should be upset if someone admits they don't have the time to repeat the same information, again, when it is so easily accessed through a search.
 

Nightstalker47

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P.regalis do not do well in a communal setting, they may be fairly tolerant of each other in the early stages but the same could be said about a great many different species.

I think they can be considered about as communal as N.incei, and we all saw how that turned out. M.balfouri can even occasionally cannibalize, so nothing is set in stone as far as what's communal and what isn't, it would depend on the keeper, the age of the spiders, the setup, the amount of food offered and I bet temperatures would play a role as well.

@14pokies makes a good point, the search function would quickly counter the belief of P.regalis being a communal species. I think communal would imply it worked out in the long term, this hasn't been the case with P.regalis. It has been done successfully with M.balfouri but not the former, comparing them can be misleading...

I've seen them in communal enclosures, I'm just telling you what I've seen with my own eyes, if you know differently then please enlighten me, rather than saying "No they don't..."
Anyone with time and money could throw a bunch of spiders in an enclosure, coming across that kind of setup would not warrant your claim, had you kept them that way successfully long term I would be less skeptical on your opinion.

From what I have read it's only a matter of time before things go south, I would value the opinion of someone who's bred and had to rear pokie egg sacs, (@14pokies) that's the only way you could experience it for yourself. Not saying it would never work, but general consensus is that it hasn't, seeing the odd communal setups is the exception to the rule, some people like to live dangerously and take the risk.
 

mconnachan

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P.regalis do not do well in a communal setting, they may be fairly tolerant of each other in the early stages but the same could be said about a great many different species.

I think they can be considered about as communal as N.incei, and we all saw how that turned out. M.balfouri can even occasionally cannibalize, so nothing is set in stone as far as what's communal and what isn't, it would depend on the keeper, the age of the spiders, the setup, the amount of food offered and I bet temperatures would play a role as well.

@14pokies makes a good point, the search function would quickly counter the belief of P.regalis being a communal species. I think communal would imply it worked out in the long term, this hasn't been the case with P.regalis. It has been done successfully with M.balfouri but not the former, comparing them can be misleading...


Anyone with time and money could throw a bunch of spiders in an enclosure, coming across that kind of setup would not warrant your claim, had you kept them that way successfully long term I would be less skeptical on your opinion.

From what I have read it's only a matter of time before things go south, I would value the opinion of someone who's bred and had to rear pokie egg sacs, (@14pokies) that's the only way you could experience it for yourself. Not saying it would never work, but general consensus is that it hasn't, seeing the odd communal setups is the exception to the rule, some people like to live dangerously and take the risk.
Fair point...
 

cold blood

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pokies are ONLY "communal" as slings...by 2" you are taking a huge risk...some species of poecs wont even tolerate one another as slings.....regalis is 100%, without question, NOT communal.

Incei are closer, but still not communal....but people keep trying and trying...hoping the same old experiment will suddenly yield new and differrent results....Einstien described that as something....hmm, oh yeah...INSANITY.:happy:
 
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