Nematodes

cacoseraph

ArachnoGod
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Jan 5, 2005
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ok, i think you can relax a tiny bit, Draiman. it sucks, but all is not without hope



though it IS true we are not 100% sure on vectors we are starting to get the picture that some intermediary is probably the vector in most cases. so... that is really good news... it should be relatively easy for you to isolate each bug from all the others, or at least make little isolation groups.... just put them in unventilated tupperware supercontainers until this is all over

you might want to get two cups, a small one with rubbing alcohol and a large one with water. each time you are going to move from maintaining one bug to the next swirl your forceps in the alcohol and then swirl them in the water. i would change the water every 5-6 cages though... you don't really want to be putting drops of even dilute alcohol into your other cages, if you can reasonably avoid it


i would say for the next three months you need to be REALLY careful about cross contaminating.... and in that time do some research to see if you can figure out what a good time frame for your quarantine period is. if you see stuff that says todes can encyst or hibernate or go into stasis or anything like that... well, that is not good news. (ah crap, i am getting a very fuzzy memory that they can encyst... but my dad has a degree in soil science and it is a very old feeling memory so it could be from when i was ~7 and he was telling me about plant parasitic todes)
 

Draiman

Arachnoking
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I have decided to simply euthanize the two surviving centipedes. The spiderling that came in the same package will be kept alive for now, because it's a rare, expensive species and is feeding well. It seems healthy. Also, I'm not sure if the nematodes that infected the dead dehaani could infect spiders. Surely they're more specific than that? In any case, the two S. morsitans are inexpensive and dispensable, especially when the safety of my entire collection is at stake. So they will have to go.

Unless anyone wants them for research purposes or something.
 

cacoseraph

ArachnoGod
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dang, i am seriously tempted to try to get those specimens from you!

but i am broke as a bad joke and i think any useful structures would degrade shipping it to the USA




i'm real sorry for this man. i think if you freeze the remains and save it maybe someone can use it for some science at some point inthe future.


ACTUALLY freezing would be really bad, now that i think about it. the ice crystals would probably slash up the very microstructures that someone might be looking for. i guess an alcohol storage solution would be the best

have you read how to preserve dead bugs in alcohol? it isn't that tough, but it is a multi-step process to get it right
 

Draiman

Arachnoking
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May 9, 2008
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dang, i am seriously tempted to try to get those specimens from you!

but i am broke as a bad joke and i think any useful structures would degrade shipping it to the USA




i'm real sorry for this man. i think if you freeze the remains and save it maybe someone can use it for some science at some point inthe future.


ACTUALLY freezing would be really bad, now that i think about it. the ice crystals would probably slash up the very microstructures that someone might be looking for. i guess an alcohol storage solution would be the best

have you read how to preserve dead bugs in alcohol? it isn't that tough, but it is a multi-step process to get it right
I could have done it, in fact not too long ago I sent a preserved centipede specimen to Germany, so it's doable. Buuut these guys are gone now though :/

If/when I get another animal clearly or even potentially infected with nematodes I'll drop it in alcohol and I'll keep you in mind caco (don't worry, with the kind of luck I have it won't be too far away).
 

Gel

Arachnoknight
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Oct 31, 2011
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215
Don't mean to necro an old thread but this one already had a great discussion going.

Acquired some ispods as a clean up crew and noticed some nematodes in the soil.

Edit: I was told that these are the type that only really affect springtail cultures by eating the eggs.

What are the chances that these are the the type that just live in the soil and wont cause much harm? Will only time tell?

Unless the enclosure is crawling with them, is there a point to clean them out, only to have them come right back again?
 
Last edited:

tmcv

Arachnosquire
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Apr 5, 2012
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'M sorry if it already said, i didn't have time to read all the posts.
I'm a veterinary of a huge collection of arthropos in Brazil. I can tell that this maggots are NOT nematodes. This are just fly larvae or another necrofagic insect. This larvae probally appear after the pedes death, and are very common when you let the animal dead for a while. In tarantulas is very common the apperance of larvae inside the animals body wile the T is live (of course the animal die after this!) From parasitic wasps. Parasitic insects never was describle for centipedes, so for sure this are just insect maggots and your animal died for another cause, this maggots are just opportunistics.
The white secretion from T mouth said in this topics are sign of nematodes, but you only can define in the microscope. Actually the most of the nematodes infection in arthropods are only defined macroscopically, with a few exceptions.

In the first page, someone put a red circle over the photo indicating a black nematode. That was just the animal's forcipule...

I hope that i helped you, any doubt i'm open for questions

Cheers
 
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