Neholothele incei

Tenevanica

Arachnodemon
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This is a species I've got my eye on. (Though the list of species I've got my eye on grows ever larger every day. It's at least a few hundred species deep at this point.) How difficult are they to care for? I understand they're similar to Hapalopus sp. in terms of care, but are they as hardy? How fast are they? Just interested to hear what people think of this species.

Also, if I share this video I have a chance to win a sling of this species, so I'm sharing it here.

Maybe you could get a chance at winning the sling as well? (I'm not sure if this is allowed, but if I'm breaking any rules, please tell me, mods!)
 

magicmed

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I don't have any experience with N. Incei but I know @cold blood could probably tell you everything you need to know. I know he also has some for sale both olive and gold.

I have heard that they are fast and relatively sturdy
 

cold blood

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They are indeed very very fast, but despite this, they're honestly not that difficult to deal with....they're not confrontational, mine didn't even do anything but hide when I removed the sac.

They do require damp substrate, especially when small (there's a little more tolerance with adults, but they should not be kept dry) as the young ones seem to be prone to getting molts stuck...I've had to manually remove several tiny molts.

Aside from that they web a lot and often burrow. They also have a fantastic feeding response even as slings, and they do grow fairly quickly....the golds (at least mine) seem to grow even faster....my olives are pushing an inch, the golds are all over an inch....same exact feeding schedule.

They're also pretty cool looking.
 

EulersK

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Cold blood pretty much covered it, but just to add to that; I'd suggest a larger than normal enclosure. For terrestrials, we usually offer around 3x dls in floor space... mine has about 6x dls, and she's still managed to utilize the entire enclosure by creating web tubes everywhere. Granted, the enclosure is still small, but the point is that they appreciate space more than the average terrestrial. A larger enclosure also reduces the chance of an escape. This spider will always choose to run rather than fight, and sometimes they run in a random direction. Having plenty of space that is "theirs" avoids them jumping ship.
 

Tenevanica

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They are indeed very very fast, but despite this, they're honestly not that difficult to deal with....they're not confrontational, mine didn't even do anything but hide when I removed the sac.

They do require damp substrate, especially when small (there's a little more tolerance with adults, but they should not be kept dry) as the young ones seem to be prone to getting molts stuck...I've had to manually remove several tiny molts.

Aside from that they web a lot and often burrow. They also have a fantastic feeding response even as slings, and they do grow fairly quickly....the golds (at least mine) seem to grow even faster....my olives are pushing an inch, the golds are all over an inch....same exact feeding schedule.

They're also pretty cool looking.
Very similar to Hapalopus then? I know I can handle these. Thanks so much!
 

EulersK

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Very similar to Hapalopus then? I know I can handle these. Thanks so much!
Eh. They're similar in that they're dwarves and speedy. H. sp. "Columbia" can handle it much drier than N. incei can, and the Columbia is much more prone to hunkering down in a single hide rather than using an entire enclosure like I alluded to earlier.

Note that N. incei is communal, although I failed miserably at that setup, so best of luck if you attempt it. Keep them humid, provide plenty of webbing anchor points, offer burrowing room, and feed readily. Oh, and a catch cup. Always have one of those nearby.
 

Tenevanica

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Eh. They're similar in that they're dwarves and speedy. H. sp. "Columbia" can handle it much drier than N. incei can, and the Columbia is much more prone to hunkering down in a single hide rather than using an entire enclosure like I alluded to earlier.
This would be different for everyone, but it appears that to meet the proper husbandry needs of H. incei I'd need to keep them the same way I do H. sp. "Columbia" (Which I believe has been formally described as Hapalopus formosus.). I'd just provide them a larger than normal enclosure. Other than that from what I've read I can keep them the same way I keep my H. formosus.
 

EulersK

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Is it H. formosus now? Do you have a reference for that? I must have missed it.

I definitely don't keep mine the same. Similar, sure, but not the same. A large enclosure would be wasted on an H. formosus (?) in my experience, and as I said, they don't need it quite as humid. Do they appreciate it? Absolutely, but H. incei actually needs it to be humid, lest you want a curled spider.
 

Tenevanica

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Yes sweet CB you are right:) the Hapalopus is much more flighty. Fast as lightning :yuck::D
As I'm aware. The first time I worked with a Hapalopus sling it <strike>shot</strike> teleported straight up my arm and on to my back faster than I can blink my eyes!
 

viper69

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Very similar to Hapalopus then? I know I can handle these. Thanks so much!
I own H. sp Columbia small and the Large variant too along with N. incei (gold and normals from @cold blood ). More experience w/the first 2 than the latter. I've raised a few of the H. sp Columbia's, they can handle bone dry sub if fed well. The N. incei CANNOT. I keep my N. incei on moist sub initially, and even then I had to make it more wet. They were just past the 2i stage. Contrast that with my H. sp Columbia Large that is only a few millimeters in size (it can fit inside the abdomen of one N. incei) and no need for damp sub IF fed well.

My AF H sp. Columbia was super, one of the best Ts I owned.

The N. incei regardless of how well fed require a moist/damp sub when small. As they get larger get a bit more tolerant of dry conditions, but so far, not much more tolerant.

IME with 5 N. incei, they are far faster than my H. sp Columbia's, and even more nimble too. They are as fast as my M. balfouri slings.

As Eulers said H sp Columbia will stick with one burrow, and N. incei will use more than one. I know that Storm76 setup an adult I believe, with 2 hides at different levels, and that female used both. He has a YouTube video of it.

N. incei will get fat when you feed them, their abdomens really get large for their size relative to Columbia's. They will also rush up to the top of the container when you feed them IF the container has webbing up to the top. They will charge for food. It's truly an impressive species.

They don't tackle prey as H sp Columbia do IME. H sp Columbia really own that title of all the T species IMO.

The golds are different in size and build than the normals as well. I haven't come across any descriptions of differences between the two, but there is no doubt a difference between these two.
 
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viper69

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(Which I believe has been formally described as Hapalopus formosus.)
This isn't true based on the research I did on the forum. If you have some other info please share.

The original discoverer of this species only THOUGHT it might be H. formosus, it was pure speculation. Look for Joe Rossi and Martin of TCanada's posts. And read whatever other links are contained w/in that thread. Martin specifically mentions what I just wrote. There is an email in there from Rick West via Joe Rossi as well.

http://arachnoboards.com/threads/hapalopus-sp-columbia.224191/
 
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