Needs clarification on molting

jhapidzacosta

Arachnopeon
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May 3, 2021
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I just wanted to ask. My Vagan tarantula is 3.5yrs old. She just molted today. How long will she molt again??
 

BoyFromLA

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I just wanted to ask. My Vagan tarantula is 3.5yrs old. She just molted today. How long will she molt again??
So, you have a Tliltocatl vagans just molted today, and you are curious when would be it’s next molt?

If that’s the case, the answer is no one knows, but your tarantula.
 

sasker

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Oct 9, 2016
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So how big is your tarantula? My adult B. hamorii has moult cycles of longer than a year.
 

Neonblizzard

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It varies a lot from species to species. I think a generalisation is an adult molts about once a year.
Some species can go much longer than that though.
 

viper69

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I just wanted to ask. My Vagan tarantula is 3.5yrs old. She just molted today. How long will she molt again??
Research the forum for such answer.

No one knows.

You have not provided enough info to even give an estimated GUESS.

@BoyFromLA gave you the most accurate answer based on the lack of info you provided.

Your question was as helpful as you asking us when you’ll be hungry next.
 

l4nsky

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Generally, molting periods are shorter when the tarantulas are younger and become more spaced apart as the T's get older. The expected life expectancy of the tarantula also plays into this as well. Species where the females live 10-15 years will generally have a roughly 1 year molt period for adult females. When you start looking at those species that can live decades (P. muticus, Aphonopelma sp, Grammostola sp, etc), the molting period can be on the scale of several years apart for adult females. Of course, all of this can be influenced to some degree, through feeding frequency/amount and temperatures (especially when younger). That's why giving a specific answer is nigh impossible. If you've had the specimen for years and keep meticulous records, it is possible to get a rough estimate, but even then it's a guess (although an educated one).
 
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