Need ideas for my 40 gallon tank

ZeBushMan

Arachnopeon
Joined
May 21, 2017
Messages
1
Ok, so i have a completely empty 40 gallon tank and I'm looking for a beginner lizard to setup for. I'm a beginner and I need a slightly low maintenance but social lizard so my parents could watch it while I'm away sometimes(Which isn't very often at all due to me still being in school). Could you guys throw me any recommendations and if you've ever had one what they were like and how difficult it is. thanks! it is a 36x18, 40 gallon tank!
 

Anoplogaster

Arachnodemon
Joined
Jan 15, 2017
Messages
675
Well, I guess it depends on what you want in a lizard. Ease of care? Because lots of species are actually quite easy once you have the environment dialed in. Docile personality? The bearded dragon fits that nicely, along with leopard geckos. You can also consider a Uromastix, if you've never seen one. Super cool lizards, but can get a little big. But they are potatoes on legs:D Of course, reptiles need to be conditioned to be docile. If you leave them alone for a while, they get nervous around you. So handle frequently if you want it docile.

Let me know if you have questions about setup. I've had reptiles all my life:)
 

mconnachan

Arachnoprince
Joined
Aug 5, 2012
Messages
1,244
An M.Balfouri communal set - up would be an awesome way of utilising your 40 gallon terrarium, it's so cool seeing them working together, sharing meals, defending each other whilst moulting, these are just some of the behaviour I've seen from these awesome sp. Hope you choose something really amazing.
 

CWilson1351

Arachnobaron
Joined
Jan 23, 2017
Messages
454
I gotta agree with the Leopard gecko or Uromastyx. In fact once I get the new cage and spacing arrangements in for the ball python I am planning on moving my female Leo into the 40 breeder I have.
 

Anoplogaster

Arachnodemon
Joined
Jan 15, 2017
Messages
675
Reptiles are tons of fun. But just keep in mind that, unlike many of our inverts, most reptiles require quite a bit more thought and care. They eat more than Ts. They definitely need heat sources. And some need UV. And they need a photo cycle (just like we do). A good investment is some light timers. Usually, you can get those at any hardware store for like $7-10 depending on how fancy it is. Set the timers to simulate day and night, and you'll save yourself a ton of trouble. Give them temperature choices: Hot on one side, cool on the other. Provide a water dish on the cool side and a hiding spot on BOTH sides.
 
Top