Need honest advice..Please!

MeAndMyRosie

Arachnopeon
Joined
Sep 10, 2016
Messages
21
Hello friends,
I am beginner in owning a tarantula and recently purchased a Chilean rose (5 yr old). I have noticed that she/he is somewhat unpredictable as well as a little skittish and possibly not a good choice as a beginner. I actually wanted to get a Chilean flame drawft but one breeder I visited told my absolutely not as a beginner. A friend of mine told maybe a Chaco golden knee would be good as they are calm and not as unpredictable as the roses.

Can you please share with me your thoughts on any of these kinds if you know about them? Basically looking for calm, handleable and easy keeper. Thank you for your advice
 

EulersK

Arachnonomicon
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Feb 22, 2013
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3,290
First off, here's a few good beginners to look at:

Secondly, G. rosea isn't a bad first choice, it's just not the best. They're some of the hardest spiders out there, but that's where the benefits end. My first spider was the closely related G. porteri, so you're in good company :)
 

Venom1080

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Sep 24, 2015
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4,583
G porteri is a ok choice. i dont know what you mean by unpredictable and skittish, nearly all tarantulas are like that... i think you mean E sp red when you say chilean flame, thats quite possibly the best beginner species out there for the absolute beginner. your breeder doesnt know what he's talking about. i started with a G porteri when i was 10, i think you'll manage..
 

kooky

Arachnosquire
Joined
Aug 4, 2016
Messages
91
Hello friends,
I am beginner in owning a tarantula and recently purchased a Chilean rose (5 yr old). I have noticed that she/he is somewhat unpredictable as well as a little skittish and possibly not a good choice as a beginner. I actually wanted to get a Chilean flame drawft but one breeder I visited told my absolutely not as a beginner. A friend of mine told maybe a Chaco golden knee would be good as they are calm and not as unpredictable as the roses.

Can you please share with me your thoughts on any of these kinds if you know about them? Basically looking for calm, handleable and easy keeper. Thank you for your advice
Personally i would suggest the Euathlos Sp. i think thats the chilean flame. They are small, pretty enough species, that is so docile and calm, and very curious. half the time they are wanting out the tub as soon as its open. Lovely little species that everyone should have. My G.pulchripes *golden knee* i haven't actually seen much of at all. it has moulted once and remained buried ever since. i assume it is going to moult again but its a pet hole i haven't seen or fed for close to 5 weeks. I would say G.pulchripes are as unpredictable, from what i have seen as adults, as a chile rose.
 

MeAndMyRosie

Arachnopeon
Joined
Sep 10, 2016
Messages
21
First off, here's a few good beginners to look at:

Secondly, G. rosea isn't a bad first choice, it's just not the best. They're some of the hardest spiders out there, but that's where the benefits end. My first spider was the closely related G. porteri, so you're in good company :)
Thanks for the video... BTW did you make that video?
What is your opinion on the Chilean flame (e. sp red- drawft)? I really don't want a massive spider and that video states they get pretty big. I haven't heard of the other 2 drawft spoken of, but are they handleable/calm?
I found a breeder that has a Chilean flame but it only 3/4". Would that size be hard to care for as a beginner? Let me know your thoughts. Oh another thing, I am not a newbie in keeping exotic pets. I currently also have a leopard gecko and had 2 ball phyons a few years back, but the boyfriend took off with them.. Anyhow!
 

Venom1080

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Joined
Sep 24, 2015
Messages
4,583
Thanks for the video... BTW did you make that video?
What is your opinion on the Chilean flame (e. sp red- drawft)? I really don't want a massive spider and that video states they get pretty big. I haven't heard of the other 2 drawft spoken of, but are they handleable/calm?
I found a breeder that has a Chilean flame but it only 3/4". Would that size be hard to care for as a beginner? Let me know your thoughts. Oh another thing, I am not a newbie in keeping exotic pets. I currently also have a leopard gecko and had 2 ball phyons a few years back, but the boyfriend took off with them.. Anyhow!
keep them like brachypelma, very easy.

edit: you prob dont know how to care for Brachys, my bad. keep them on the dry side with a small water bowl. (water bottle cap) temps 70+, feed them prekilled small crickets till it grows to 1", then it can handle pretty much any size crik except for the largest. they are very slow growers. its cage can be a small deli cup or a vial. tarantulas as a whole dont like to handled, but if you MUST, then yes they are a pretty tolerant genus. btw its Euathlus sp red. they dont get much bigger than 4", correct me if im wrong.
 

EulersK

Arachnonomicon
Staff member
Joined
Feb 22, 2013
Messages
3,290
Thanks for the video... BTW did you make that video?
What is your opinion on the Chilean flame (e. sp red- drawft)? I really don't want a massive spider and that video states they get pretty big. I haven't heard of the other 2 drawft spoken of, but are they handleable/calm?
I found a breeder that has a Chilean flame but it only 3/4". Would that size be hard to care for as a beginner? Let me know your thoughts. Oh another thing, I am not a newbie in keeping exotic pets. I currently also have a leopard gecko and had 2 ball phyons a few years back, but the boyfriend took off with them.. Anyhow!
Yeah, that's me. I think that's a great spider - that is, the E. sp. "Red". I didn't go over it in that video, though. It's actually a dwarf tarantula, maxing out at around 3". Dwarf tarantulas in general are very skittish and very fast. So no, not handleable or calm at all. However, the E. sp. "Red" is quite docile from what I've heard, although I've never kept one.

Honestly, I don't really recommend slings (baby spiders) to any beginner. They're the most accessible because they're cheap, but they're also the most fragile. You'd want to stick to a juvenile or adult. If you want something that you can handle, look into A. chalcodes. That's my #1 suggestion for any beginner. Hardy as hardy can be, relatively docile, rarely kicks hairs, and still pretty active. On top of it, you can find yourself an adult female for around $50. Take a look:
IMG_1039.JPG

Now, let's talk about handling. Tarantulas can't tolerate falls very well. If you drop one onto a hard surface from more than a few feet up, you'll be cleaning it up with a towel. If you insist on handling, ensure that you do it no more than a few inches above a soft surface, such as you bed or a pillow. Always, always be prepared for them to take off. That is, have a catch cup near by. All spiders are notorious for randomly darting off for no reason. They get no pleasure out of the process of handling - I'm not entirely anti-handling, just understand that it is purely for your benefit and not the spider's. These are pets like fish... look, don't touch.

Side note: try to stay away from common names. It makes conversation very difficult, because a single common name can refer to several spiders. Go on Google and image search "Mexican fire leg"... you'll get no less than five different species.
 

Venom1080

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Sep 24, 2015
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Yeah, that's me. I think that's a great spider - that is, the E. sp. "Red". I didn't go over it in that video, though. It's actually a dwarf tarantula, maxing out at around 3". Dwarf tarantulas in general are very skittish and very fast. So no, not handleable or calm at all.
.
thats news to me. ive seen a handling vid and it WAS difficult to handle but only because it didnt want to move.
 

MrsHaas

Arachnoangel
Joined
Nov 1, 2012
Messages
846
Hello friends,
I am beginner in owning a tarantula and recently purchased a Chilean rose (5 yr old). I have noticed that she/he is somewhat unpredictable as well as a little skittish and possibly not a good choice as a beginner. I actually wanted to get a Chilean flame drawft but one breeder I visited told my absolutely not as a beginner. A friend of mine told maybe a Chaco golden knee would be good as they are calm and not as unpredictable as the roses.

Can you please share with me your thoughts on any of these kinds if you know about them? Basically looking for calm, handleable and easy keeper. Thank you for your advice
Hate to tell you this, bub, but my Rosie is sooooo much more "docile" than my G. pulchripes (Chaco golden knee)... Not to mention not as expensive.

If you're gonna be serious AB the tarantula hobby, then get used to unpredictability!!! I genus know to be pet rocks can devil flash on you for no reason. It's all AB the individual tarantulas temperament.

For example, OBTs Are a certain species that is known for being "aggressive." I have a 6" adult female OBT that I have never seen even the slightest leg raise indicating a minor threat pose, in fact she was the easiest unboxing I have even done in my many years in this hobby. But I can promise you that the majority (and I'm talking like 95% - but don't quote me lol) of the ppl on the boards would tell you their OBT has Shown them a mean, nasty, toothy threat pose (or at least some sign of a rear pose) at least once (or not believe me lol).

Anyways, brachypelma, aphonopelma, and grammastola ar the 3 genus that most people would say ar best for beginners - and I have to agree. Good luck searching for a T that is right for you! Some time the hunt for t you want can be just as rewarding as owning it!
 
Last edited:

EulersK

Arachnonomicon
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Feb 22, 2013
Messages
3,290
thats news to me. ive seen a handling vid and it WAS difficult to handle but only because it didnt want to move.
Yeah, I edited my post - Euathlus is the exception :p I was referring to the dwarf species I brought up in my video (and in general, for that matter): N. incei and H. sp. "Columbia". If you can handle those two species, then you're the spider whisperer.
 

WeightedAbyss75

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Feb 22, 2014
Messages
921
My chaco is not skittish at all. This may just be because she is a big adult female, but I even held her today while she tried to come out while on tank maintinence. Won't even move if I prod her sometimes ;) Also, @MrsHaas is right: depends on the individual. I'm sure somewhere there is a hardcore defensive and skittish Euathlus sp. (hard to believe, I know). Just really comes down to how lucky you are with the T. Especially rosies, they seem to be famine or feast with temperment :D
 

viper69

ArachnoGod
Old Timer
Joined
Dec 8, 2006
Messages
11,531
not a good choice as a beginner. I actually wanted to get a Chilean flame drawft but one breeder I visited told my absolutely not as a beginner
Not the best choice, but not the worst.

As for the Chilean flame, that's typically the common name for the E. sp. Red (see pics below). If that the T, on the surface your breeder doesn't know what they are talking about. They are an excellent beginner T if one is patient as females grow slowly.

Chaco Golden Knees, aka G. pulchripes, are excellent beginner T, almost as good as E sp Red, some ways better, in others not. Can't go wrong w/either.

 

MeAndMyRosie

Arachnopeon
Joined
Sep 10, 2016
Messages
21
G porteri is a ok choice. i dont know what you mean by unpredictable and skittish, nearly all tarantulas are like that... i think you mean E sp red when you say chilean flame, thats quite possibly the best beginner species out there for the absolute beginner. your breeder doesnt know what he's talking about. i started with a G porteri when i was 10, i think you'll manage..
Well what if getting the Euathlus sp red but it's only 3/4" right now. Some ppl say not to start out that small but these guys aren't gonna get that big anyway. Is it really that hard to raise a 3/4" ? How would you go about the care at that size? And would you need to chop up its food for a while until about 1"?
 

MeAndMyRosie

Arachnopeon
Joined
Sep 10, 2016
Messages
21
Not the best choice, but not the worst.

As for the Chilean flame, that's typically the common name for the E. sp. Red (see pics below). If that the T, on the surface your breeder doesn't know what they are talking about. They are an excellent beginner T if one is patient as females grow slowly.

Chaco Golden Knees, aka G. pulchripes, are excellent beginner T, almost as good as E sp Red, some ways better, in others not. Can't go wrong w/either.

They are so beautiful to me... I bet they are stunning after a molt. Are they hard to keep? Did you get yours young or adults?
 

viper69

ArachnoGod
Old Timer
Joined
Dec 8, 2006
Messages
11,531
They are so beautiful to me... I bet they are stunning after a molt. Are they hard to keep? Did you get yours young or adults?
I have no idea what you are talking about, I mentioned 2 species, I cannot read your mind.
 

MeAndMyRosie

Arachnopeon
Joined
Sep 10, 2016
Messages
21
Yeah, that's me. I think that's a great spider - that is, the E. sp. "Red". I didn't go over it in that video, though. It's actually a dwarf tarantula, maxing out at around 3". Dwarf tarantulas in general are very skittish and very fast. So no, not handleable or calm at all. However, the E. sp. "Red" is quite docile from what I've heard, although I've never kept one.

Honestly, I don't really recommend slings (baby spiders) to any beginner. They're the most accessible because they're cheap, but they're also the most fragile. You'd want to stick to a juvenile or adult. If you want something that you can handle, look into A. chalcodes. That's my #1 suggestion for any beginner. Hardy as hardy can be, relatively docile, rarely kicks hairs, and still pretty active. On top of it, you can find yourself an adult female for around $50. Take a look:
View attachment 220655

Now, let's talk about handling. Tarantulas can't tolerate falls very well. If you drop one onto a hard surface from more than a few feet up, you'll be cleaning it up with a towel. If you insist on handling, ensure that you do it no more than a few inches above a soft surface, such as you bed or a pillow. Always, always be prepared for them to take off. That is, have a catch cup near by. All spiders are notorious for randomly darting off for no reason. They get no pleasure out of the process of handling - I'm not entirely anti-handling, just understand that it is purely for your benefit and not the spider's. These are pets like fish... look, don't touch.

Side note: try to stay away from common names. It makes conversation very difficult, because a single common name can refer to several spiders. Go on Google and image search "Mexican fire leg"... you'll get no less than five different species.
Thanks for the pic...actually isn't that a desert blonde, Arizona blonde ect..? I researched them as well, but I live in Toronto Canada and those species are only available in the US.
 

Venom1080

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Joined
Sep 24, 2015
Messages
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Well what if getting the Euathlus sp red but it's only 3/4" right now. Some ppl say not to start out that small but these guys aren't gonna get that big anyway. Is it really that hard to raise a 3/4" ? How would you go about the care at that size? And would you need to chop up its food for a while until about 1"?
if it was a genus that gave a poop about the humidity than i'd be against it. but arid NW slings are soooo easy. its really simple. if you look at one of my last posts i explained everything. as for chopping up food, dont bother, just smash the feeders head and throw it in. overflow the small water dish a bit once or twice a week and thats it for humidity. once its about 1.5" dont bother wetting the sub at all.
 

Venom1080

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Thanks for the pic...actually isn't that a desert blonde, Arizona blonde ect..? I researched them as well, but I live in Toronto Canada and those species are only available in the US.
you can find them for sale from online breeders. Tarantula Canada for example, but i dont think they have any in stock right now..
 

EulersK

Arachnonomicon
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Messages
3,290
Thanks for the pic...actually isn't that a desert blonde, Arizona blonde ect..? I researched them as well, but I live in Toronto Canada and those species are only available in the US.
Untrue, you can get them. @VanessaS is up there, and she's got one. They're just a tad more rare. Keep an eye out! I promise that they're worth it.
 
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