Need help to identify

reptileman140

Arachnopeon
Joined
Mar 27, 2011
Messages
13
I bought these at a pet store i was told they didn't know exactly what species. They are aggressive. They are always on the log upside down or in a hole in the log.If anyone could help me identify these it would be appreciated.

Thanks, Justin

scorpions123.jpg

2011-03-26_20-42-46_734.jpg

2011-03-26_21-03-52_668-1.jpg

2011-03-26_20-43-13_261.jpg

2011-03-27_23-06-19_696.jpg
 
Last edited:

Envyizm

Arachnoknight
Old Timer
Joined
Oct 5, 2008
Messages
194
I'm almost positive they are Mesobuthus martensii. They were recently imported and have been sold in pretty large numbers lately in the states. I have a group of 5 at the moment. If you find one that has a small notch in the chela "claws", you have yourself a male. They are semi arid to arid species and are very tolerant of one another at adult stages.
 

Michiel

Arachnoking
Old Timer
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May 22, 2006
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3,479
They look like M.martensi indeed, so I would say that it is a Mesobuthus species, possibly M.martensi.
 

jgod790

Arachnoknight
Joined
Mar 28, 2011
Messages
260
Thats a pretty looking critter you got there. I hope you figure out what it is so you know how to take care of it. Wish I could help but Im only familiar with Tropical/forest scorpions. And thats obviously a desert species. Congratulations its a real beauty.
 

Michiel

Arachnoking
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May 22, 2006
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Thats a pretty looking critter you got there. I hope you figure out what it is so you know how to take care of it. Wish I could help but Im only familiar with Tropical/forest scorpions. And thats obviously a desert species. Congratulations its a real beauty.
And how did you see that? (that it is OBVIOUSLY a desert species)...

PS. It lives in several types of habitat, and also in tropical forest areas....Very curious of your answer.....:D
 

jgod790

Arachnoknight
Joined
Mar 28, 2011
Messages
260
Well I guess I was wrong. I just assumed it was a desert species cause of how it looks. I guess I need to do more homework, but I thought tropical/forest species were more so like emperors, and the asian forest scorpion. I kind of figured big dark blue, or black scorpions=tropical/forest and small tan/brown=desert. I stand corrected and I will not make such wide assumptions anymore. But now Im curious, was the identity of this species discovered?
 

Michiel

Arachnoking
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May 22, 2006
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Well I guess I was wrong. I just assumed it was a desert species cause of how it looks. I guess I need to do more homework, but I thought tropical/forest species were more so like emperors, and the asian forest scorpion. I kind of figured big dark blue, or black scorpions=tropical/forest and small tan/brown=desert. I stand corrected and I will not make such wide assumptions anymore. But now Im curious, was the identity of this species discovered?
That thought/theory is not strange or wrong, it is true that there is a relation between the coloration of scorpions and the substrates they live on....In general scorpions that live in tropical forests have a dark coloration and that "desert" species are light colored. You only 'forgot' there are exceptions......

About the ID, we can't be totally sure.....It has the traits of a Mesobuthus species and most commonly imported one is M.martensii.
 

jgod790

Arachnoknight
Joined
Mar 28, 2011
Messages
260
Honestly, I dont know how anyone can tell the difference when it comes to the smaller scorpion species. The fat tails, and death stalkers defiantly look different, but almost everything else looks like an Arizona bark scorpion to me.
 

Chrome69

Arachnoknight
Old Timer
Joined
Oct 12, 2009
Messages
268
Honestly, I dont know how anyone can tell the difference when it comes to the smaller scorpion species. The fat tails, and death stalkers defiantly look different, but almost everything else looks like an Arizona bark scorpion to me.
Here are a few things to look for, how many points on the telson (eg babycurus have 2, a smaller point above the normal one), how wide the body is, color matching, leg color, shape of the tail segments, top eyes, granulation pattern, pedipalp shape, etc.

Put a vaejovid sp and a centruroid sp picture side by side and then you'll kinda see what is looked for.
 

John Bokma

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
Joined
May 31, 2005
Messages
486
To illustrate Michiel's point:


Centruroides sp.
and


Centruroides fulvipes

Were found close to each other in the same dry & hot habitat, which also included a dark colored Vaejovis sp. To complicate things further, some species are very adaptable; I find Centruroides gracilis in very dry areas and in more moist areas (mango groves, edge of pine forest, near rivers).
 

jgod790

Arachnoknight
Joined
Mar 28, 2011
Messages
260
Thanks guys, your information and illustrations are very helpful. I need to get more into collecting scorpions. I have 3 emperors (Pandinus imperator) but that's it as far as my scorpion collection goes. What scorpion species would you guys recommend for someone who has mastered emperor scorpion care?
 

reptileman140

Arachnopeon
Joined
Mar 27, 2011
Messages
13
thanks everyone I found out that they are mesobuthus martensii i have five now I could just use help figuring out how to sex them
 

reptileman140

Arachnopeon
Joined
Mar 27, 2011
Messages
13
I'm almost positive they are Mesobuthus martensii. They were recently imported and have been sold in pretty large numbers lately in the states. I have a group of 5 at the moment. If you find one that has a small notch in the chela "claws", you have yourself a male. They are semi arid to arid species and are very tolerant of one another at adult stages.

I sexed them using the claw method and it was very easy thank you i have four females and one male.
 
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