need expert housing advice

frodogecko

Arachnopeon
Joined
Feb 7, 2017
Messages
25
Please help, I've got 4 T's that have grown large enough to move into more permanent housing, but I'm not sure about the size and type. All 4 require higher humidity levels than any of my other T's so I'm worried about using a standard tank because of mold growth. The 4 I'm rehousing are a Lasiodora difficilis, a Lasiodora papahybana, an Avicularia avicularia, and an Avicularia versicolor. I already have 2 exo-terra tanks with the front ventilation (one measures 12x12x12 the other is 8x8x12) and I have 2 regular 10 gallon tanks. Is 8x8x12 large enough for either of the Avicularia? And is 12x12x12 large enough for the Lasiodora difficilis? I know the Lasiodora papahybana will grow really big (he's only about 3" right now), he'll need a larger tank later. How do you keep the humidity levels high in a regular tank without getting mold? I can always buy more of the tanks with front ventilation. Do they really work, as far as preventing mold? The size of the tank is also a concern. I want them to have enough room, but I'm also running out of space for all my babies so I need to use the smallest tank possible, while still giving them enough room.
 
Last edited:

Moonohol

Two Legged Freak
Joined
Aug 8, 2016
Messages
115
All of the species you named can be kept dry. I keep my L. difficilis dry and wet down one half of the substrate every few months. I keep all of my Avics dry with a large water dish and lots of ventilation. In order to recommend the correct size enclosure, we'll need to know the sizes of all of your Ts first. For instance, the LP and LD would both be comfortable in 15-20 gallon enclosures at adult size, but that would be far too large for a juvie.
 

Kayis

Arachnopeon
Joined
Sep 26, 2016
Messages
37
You shouldn't have to worry about mold with any of those T's and may be too worried about humidity levels. Just remove boluses and overflow water dishes and let it dry out. RUB's? (really useful boxes) would be your cheapest bet.
 

viper69

ArachnoGod
Old Timer
Joined
Dec 8, 2006
Messages
14,346
Please help, I've got 4 T's that have grown large enough to move into more permanent housing, but I'm not sure about the size and type. All 4 require higher humidity levels than any of my other T's so I'm worried about using a standard tank because of mold growth. The 4 I'm rehousing are a Lasiodora difficilis, a Lasiodora papahybana, an Avicularia avicularia, and an Avicularia versicolor. I already have 2 exo-terra tanks with the front ventilation (one measures 12x12x12 the other is 8x8x12) and I have 2 regular 10 gallon tanks. Is 8x8x12 large enough for either of the Avicularia? And is 12x12x12 large enough for the Lasiodora difficilis? I know the Lasiodora papahybana will grow really big (he's only about 3" right now), he'll need a larger tank later. How do you keep the humidity levels high in a regular tank without getting mold? I can always buy more of the tanks with front ventilation. Do they really work, as far as preventing mold? The size of the tank is also a concern. I want them to have enough room, but I'm also running out of space for all my babies so I need to use the smallest tank possible, while still giving them enough room.
You have been reading too many care sheets or listening to ill informed people, both of which will kill your Avics w/out question.

No tank can prevent mold if it's TOO wet, and in no uncertain terms should your Avic tank be wet or have air that is moist/stuffy, that kills Avics even w/out mold. What they need is a good amount of mass air exchange which ExoTerra Arboreal setups can provide. Also, don't use screen tops, that can injur a T as well, replace with drilled holes in an acrylic sheet.

All Avics need are a water bowl, and GENERALLY most will drink from it. There are some Avics that will not drink from a bowl. In which case use a dropper to provide them water onto surfaces, they don't like misting, they aren't plants.

Basics for Avics, Q's, ask back here AFTER reading

http://arachnoboards.com/threads/avicularia-husbandry.282549/#post-2461399
 

Walker253

Arachnobaron
Joined
Jun 12, 2016
Messages
555
Ventilation is key. The smaller Exo is fine for either Avic. Put the smaller one in it. Like the above poster said, overflow the water dish from time to time and let it dry out. You shouldn't have a problem.
 

frodogecko

Arachnopeon
Joined
Feb 7, 2017
Messages
25
All of the species you named can be kept dry. I keep my L. difficilis dry and wet down one half of the substrate every few months. I keep all of my Avics dry with a large water dish and lots of ventilation. In order to recommend the correct size enclosure, we'll need to know the sizes of all of your Ts first. For instance, the LP and LD would both be comfortable in 15-20 gallon enclosures at adult size, but that would be far too large for a juvie.
Right now the Avics are about 3-4". I wanted to move each of them into an 8x8x12 with the front ventilation and I hoping that would be large enough to last through their adulthood. The LD and the LP are about 3", I was hoping a 10 gallon tank would be large enough for them. I was just worried about keeping the humidity high and mold growth, but I think I've been reading too many care sheets. Reading these responses it sounds like I can keep them a lot drier than I thought.
 

Moonohol

Two Legged Freak
Joined
Aug 8, 2016
Messages
115
Right now the Avics are about 3-4". I wanted to move each of them into an 8x8x12 with the front ventilation and I hoping that would be large enough to last through their adulthood. The LD and the LP are about 3", I was hoping a 10 gallon tank would be large enough for them. I was just worried about keeping the humidity high and mold growth, but I think I've been reading too many care sheets. Reading these responses it sounds like I can keep them a lot drier than I thought.
Yes, can the care sheets. They're all useless! You'll get much better husbandry advice by searching the boards here. For Lasiodora of that size, 10 gallons is too large. 5 would be pushing it. I started my LD out in one of Jamie's 8x8x14" enclosures when she was around 2.5-3" DLS.
 

frodogecko

Arachnopeon
Joined
Feb 7, 2017
Messages
25
You have been reading too many care sheets or listening to ill informed people, both of which will kill your Avics w/out question.

No tank can prevent mold if it's TOO wet, and in no uncertain terms should your Avic tank be wet or have air that is moist/stuffy, that kills Avics even w/out mold. What they need is a good amount of mass air exchange which ExoTerra Arboreal setups can provide. Also, don't use screen tops, that can injur a T as well, replace with drilled holes in an acrylic sheet.

All Avics need are a water bowl, and GENERALLY most will drink from it. There are some Avics that will not drink from a bowl. In which case use a dropper to provide them water onto surfaces, they don't like misting, they aren't plants.

Basics for Avics, Q's, ask back here AFTER reading

http://arachnoboards.com/threads/avicularia-husbandry.282549/#post-2461399
I think you're right, I've been reading way too many care sheets. And they almost all say something different. You seem to know a lot about Avics, is 8x8x12 large enough for either of these two species? These are my first Avics (first arboreals ever).
 

Walker253

Arachnobaron
Joined
Jun 12, 2016
Messages
555
Right now the Avics are about 3-4". I wanted to move each of them into an 8x8x12 with the front ventilation and I hoping that would be large enough to last through their adulthood. The LD and the LP are about 3", I was hoping a 10 gallon tank would be large enough for them. I was just worried about keeping the humidity high and mold growth, but I think I've been reading too many care sheets. Reading these responses it sounds like I can keep them a lot drier than I thought.
The Avics would be ok in those Exo's. The Exo's are a little big, but it can work. The 10 gal for the other two are entirely too large. Even a 5 gal is too big. Think medium Critter Keeper. They will eat better and you'll have healthier T's. Too many people think their tarantulas need some expansive space. They don't. It's visually nice for you but can be a struggle for them.
I just bought a 3.5" D pentaloris yesterday in a 12x12x12 Exo. Low and behold, the person said she wasn't eating well. I put her an extra medium Critter Keeper I had when I got home. She looked better this morning. I'll drop a roach in there tonight when I get home from work. I bet she eats.
 

Venom1080

Arachnoemperor
Joined
Sep 24, 2015
Messages
4,603
you can buy appropriately sized containers from Walmart, they have all sorts of plastic tubs. 10g is overkill for just about any tarantula, but is fine for larger spiders. and dont get hopeful on those Lasiodora, if they get much more than 8", ill be surprised.
 

cold blood

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Jan 19, 2014
Messages
12,373
Please help, I've got 4 T's that have grown large enough to move into more permanent housing, but I'm not sure about the size and type. All 4 require higher humidity levels than any of my other T's so I'm worried about using a standard tank because of mold growth. The 4 I'm rehousing are a Lasiodora difficilis, a Lasiodora papahybana, an Avicularia avicularia, and an Avicularia versicolor. I already have 2 exo-terra tanks with the front ventilation (one measures 12x12x12 the other is 8x8x12) and I have 2 regular 10 gallon tanks. Is 8x8x12 large enough for either of the Avicularia? And is 12x12x12 large enough for the Lasiodora difficilis? I know the Lasiodora papahybana will grow really big (he's only about 3" right now), he'll need a larger tank later. How do you keep the humidity levels high in a regular tank without getting mold? I can always buy more of the tanks with front ventilation. Do they really work, as far as preventing mold? The size of the tank is also a concern. I want them to have enough room, but I'm also running out of space for all my babies so I need to use the smallest tank possible, while still giving them enough room.
As mentioned, none of these species have humidity requirements, in truth, no t does, they have moisture requirements....but all the species you have should be kept predominantly dry, with a water dish (no sponge). Add proper ventilation (not a screen top), and removal of uneaten food and boli, and mold should be the last thing to worry about.

I think you have been fooled again with regards to the size of the LP and LD....both, being close cousins, will reach the same sizes, and its not as big as you think, I'd bet. These are not uncommonly large, nor are they one of the largest...fact is that their sizes are about the same as many different large NW terrestrials. Females will be 7-8" and males will mature 5.5 to sometimes as big as 7". This MM difficilis is about 6.25"
Good sized, but theyre not the giants sellers would like you to believe....as they have gigantic sacs that are hard to get rid of, the typical size exaggeration ploy helps move spiders out the door faster.

Now at 3" its way too early to start thinking about their adult enclosures. I'd put them in something like a 10" X 7" KK for now....an adult enclosure for a 3" terrestrial is just a ton of wasted space....its not like they're that difficult to re-house.

The front door exo-terras are arboreal enclosures and not suitable for terrestrials, use those for the avics.

Right now the Avics are about 3-4". I wanted to move each of them into an 8x8x12 with the front ventilation and I hoping that would be large enough to last through their adulthood. The LD and the LP are about 3", I was hoping a 10 gallon tank would be large enough for them. I was just worried about keeping the humidity high and mold growth, but I think I've been reading too many care sheets. Reading these responses it sounds like I can keep them a lot drier than I thought.
Which species is which size? Avic avic gets larger, with versi being on the small side, so ultimately the larger one should go to the avic avic.

Too large is less of an issue for arboreals as theyre fast and generally good hunters...provided you give them lots of cover to work with. A good piece of wood, surrounded (top half) with plants and good ventilation is ideal. Keep the substrate dry and water in a good sized dish.

Personally I house avics that size in an intermediate enclosure...like this thumbnailed pic.

Are you heating them? If you are using a hygrometer, its better off on your desk holding papers down (it will do a better job of that and not kill your avics in the process).
 

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frodogecko

Arachnopeon
Joined
Feb 7, 2017
Messages
25
As mentioned, none of these species have humidity requirements, in truth, no t does, they have moisture requirements....but all the species you have should be kept predominantly dry, with a water dish (no sponge). Add proper ventilation (not a screen top), and removal of uneaten food and boli, and mold should be the last thing to worry about.

I think you have been fooled again with regards to the size of the LP and LD....both, being close cousins, will reach the same sizes, and its not as big as you think, I'd bet. These are not uncommonly large, nor are they one of the largest...fact is that their sizes are about the same as many different large NW terrestrials. Females will be 7-8" and males will mature 5.5 to sometimes as big as 7". This MM difficilis is about 6.25"
Good sized, but theyre not the giants sellers would like you to believe....as they have gigantic sacs that are hard to get rid of, the typical size exaggeration ploy helps move spiders out the door faster.

Now at 3" its way too early to start thinking about their adult enclosures. I'd put them in something like a 10" X 7" KK for now....an adult enclosure for a 3" terrestrial is just a ton of wasted space....its not like they're that difficult to re-house.

The front door exo-terras are arboreal enclosures and not suitable for terrestrials, use those for the avics.



Which species is which size? Avic avic gets larger, with versi being on the small side, so ultimately the larger one should go to the avic avic.

Too large is less of an issue for arboreals as theyre fast and generally good hunters...provided you give them lots of cover to work with. A good piece of wood, surrounded (top half) with plants and good ventilation is ideal. Keep the substrate dry and water in a good sized dish.

Personally I house avics that size in an intermediate enclosure...like this thumbnailed pic.

Are you heating them? If you are using a hygrometer, its better off on your desk holding papers down (it will do a better job of that and not kill your avics in the process).
As mentioned, none of these species have humidity requirements, in truth, no t does, they have moisture requirements....but all the species you have should be kept predominantly dry, with a water dish (no sponge). Add proper ventilation (not a screen top), and removal of uneaten food and boli, and mold should be the last thing to worry about.

I think you have been fooled again with regards to the size of the LP and LD....both, being close cousins, will reach the same sizes, and its not as big as you think, I'd bet. These are not uncommonly large, nor are they one of the largest...fact is that their sizes are about the same as many different large NW terrestrials. Females will be 7-8" and males will mature 5.5 to sometimes as big as 7". This MM difficilis is about 6.25"
Good sized, but theyre not the giants sellers would like you to believe....as they have gigantic sacs that are hard to get rid of, the typical size exaggeration ploy helps move spiders out the door faster.

Now at 3" its way too early to start thinking about their adult enclosures. I'd put them in something like a 10" X 7" KK for now....an adult enclosure for a 3" terrestrial is just a ton of wasted space....its not like they're that difficult to re-house.

The front door exo-terras are arboreal enclosures and not suitable for terrestrials, use those for the avics.



Which species is which size? Avic avic gets larger, with versi being on the small side, so ultimately the larger one should go to the avic avic.

Too large is less of an issue for arboreals as theyre fast and generally good hunters...provided you give them lots of cover to work with. A good piece of wood, surrounded (top half) with plants and good ventilation is ideal. Keep the substrate dry and water in a good sized dish.

Personally I house avics that size in an intermediate enclosure...like this thumbnailed pic.

Are you heating them? If you are using a hygrometer, its better off on your desk holding papers down (it will do a better job of that and not kill your avics in the process).
I do have a couple of 2.5 gallon tanks that measure 12" x 6". I think I'll use those for the LP and LD for now. I ordered another 8x8x12 front ventilation tank so each avic can house there. Yes, I do have to use a heat lamp. My husband keeps our house around 68-70 degrees, so a heat lamp is necessary. I was fooled about the size of the LP and LD. I'm not that experienced. Until just recently I had only raised a Grammostola rosea, an Aphonopelma chalcodes, and a Brachypelma smithi.
 

Abyss

Arachnoknight
Joined
Apr 15, 2016
Messages
281
Heres what most of my avic enclosures look like to geive u more ideas
 

frodogecko

Arachnopeon
Joined
Feb 7, 2017
Messages
25
Those are beautiful and smaller than I would have expected. I'm glad they don't have be really large. I'm running out of room for all my pets.
 

cold blood

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Jan 19, 2014
Messages
12,373
Heat lamps are by far the worst and most dangerous way to warm them aside from a garbage can fire nearby...lol. Seriously though, lamps are terrible...waaaaay too hot, plus they dry the air out considerably, and for an animal that relies on hydrolics, this can get dangerous quickly. 68 night, 70 daytime is just fine, no additional heat will be needed.
 

frodogecko

Arachnopeon
Joined
Feb 7, 2017
Messages
25
Heat lamps are by far the worst and most dangerous way to warm them aside from a garbage can fire nearby...lol. Seriously though, lamps are terrible...waaaaay too hot, plus they dry the air out considerably, and for an animal that relies on hydrolics, this can get dangerous quickly. 68 night, 70 daytime is just fine, no additional heat will be needed.
What about my 3 slings? Shouldn't I keep them a little warmer until they're a bit larger? One is an avic about one inch, one is a B. smithi about 1/4 inch, and a Nhandu about 1.5". I usually keep them around 75-80 degrees.
 

cold blood

Moderator
Staff member
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Messages
12,373
What about my 3 slings? Shouldn't I keep them a little warmer until they're a bit larger? One is an avic about one inch, one is a B. smithi about 1/4 inch, and a Nhandu about 1.5". I usually keep them around 75-80 degrees.
Yeah, they will grow faster...but warming slings with a lamp is like putting them in the oven on low...just a matter of time till theyre over cooked.

Those temps wont be harmful though.

A heat bath using a simple aquarium heater is a easy and economical way to heat a handful of slings.
 

viper69

ArachnoGod
Old Timer
Joined
Dec 8, 2006
Messages
14,346
I think you're right, I've been reading way too many care sheets. And they almost all say something different. You seem to know a lot about Avics, is 8x8x12 large enough for either of these two species? These are my first Avics (first arboreals ever).
I know I'm right hah. That size is fine for any Avic, even the largest ones.
 

viper69

ArachnoGod
Old Timer
Joined
Dec 8, 2006
Messages
14,346
Those are beautiful and smaller than I would have expected. I'm glad they don't have be really large. I'm running out of room for all my pets.
Those setups are not suitable for adults Avics, they are too small.

The key feature for Avics is not so much size of a tank, but how much cover they have, plants, cork bark slabs etc. You can put an Avic in a SMALL empty setup and watch it barely survive, legs withdrawn (typical defensive Avic body posture), but provide it cover so it feels safe, and watch those legs unfold like flower petals.
 
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