Mystery Scorpion - Do YOU know what it is?

tyrel

Arachnobaron
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I bought this an "Opistophthalmus sp." but when I recieved it, I wasn't sure what it was. As far as I can tell, it's either Opistophthalmus, Opisthacanthus, or Scorpio maurus. Anyone care to take a whack at an ID?


 
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H. cyaneus

Arachnobaron
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You'll have to have a dead specimen to tell the difference between those three genera, I believe. But it doesn't not look like a S. maurus to me, at least not the common ones in the trade.

Mike
 

tyrel

Arachnobaron
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If behavior would help in finding an ID, this guy is quite agressive, and strikes a defense posture at the slightest disturbance. I've heard Opisthacanthus are quite docile.

It also terraforms it's substrate. He picks it up like a little back-hoe and moves it around. I've heard Opisthacanthus are terrestrial/aboreal, as opposed to burrowers.

I mostly want to rule out Opisthacanthus as a suspect. That way I know I can keep him in a desert setup.

If anyone needs an underside shot, I could bag him and snap a photo.
 

Galapoheros

ArachnoGod
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That looks ALLOT like another scorp someone started a thread with several days ago looking for an ID. I didn't keep up with it but maybe it's the same sp and somebody ID'd it there.
 

i_like_scorps

Arachnosquire
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The only two I can think of off hand that is simular is Hadogenes troglodytes or Urodacus manicatus.
 
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tyrel

Arachnobaron
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That looks ALLOT like another scorp someone started a thread with several days ago looking for an ID. I didn't keep up with it but maybe it's the same sp and somebody ID'd it there.
Is this the thread? Close, but no cigar.

The only two I can think of off hand that is simular is Hadogenes troglodytes or Urodacus manicatus.
I'm positive it's not a Hadogenes.

Edit: I just looked up Urodacus manicatus. This guy dosn't have the same granulation on his tail.
Plus, I doubt I could of gotten hold of an Aussie scorpion in Canada.
 
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brandontmyers

Arachnoangel
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Yeah not Hadogenes, and I doubt Urodacus, they only occur in Australia right? If thats the case, then you can rule that out
 

H. cyaneus

Arachnobaron
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Tyrel,

Opisthacanthus can be found close to the ground as well. I've had 5 O. asper and they were generally found closer to the ground.

If you want to know how to set it up, keep one side of the container dry and the other part humid. Opistophthalmus likes it a little humid anyways.

Mike
 

Galapoheros

ArachnoGod
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Is this the thread? Close, but no cigar.
No, definitely not the thread I had in mind. Hadogenes was also brought up in the other thread that pictured the scorpion that looks like this one. I remember because it has the same Hadogenes looking body. It looked a little like a scorp with Hadogenes body and Pandinus chela too. I'll look for it but I have dialup.
 

tyrel

Arachnobaron
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Here it is. The thread was started about a month ago, ...a little longer than several days ago.
http://www.arachnoboards.com/ab/showthread.php?t=100044
Thanks for the link. That one is almost exactly the same, except for a small difference in the granulation of the claws. Almost certainly the same genus.

I've been doing some research and I've found that all Opistophthalmus sp. have teeth on the inside edges of thier claws. Due to the smooth claw shape, the features of the carapace, and help from this identification key, I've identified it as an Opisthacanthus sp.

Too bad, as I've been considering trading all of my bugs for desert scorpions due to care and travel issues. Oh well.
 
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