My virgin eyes

Bry

Arachnodemon
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Mar 22, 2003
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773
I've seen on several instances where you guys were able to identify a tarantula that was incorrectly labeled, or not even labeled. I realize that I'm new, but quite a few of those species look identical to me. When I see snakes that are colored the same, for the most part, I can tell the difference by head shape and a few other factors. Yet, in terms of body shape, a lot of the Ts look the same to me. What sort of factors do you look for when identifying T species, other than color and size, if any? For instance, in the pics below, without cheating and looking at the file names, how do you tell which one is a Grammastola pulchra, Aphnopelma behlei, or Haplopelma minax? The pics below belong to bill @ invertepet and e-spiderworld.







Bry
 
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Brandon

Arachnobaron
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Jul 19, 2002
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Very easly, They are all built diffrent, at least even there color. It would be hard to mistake A behlei for H minax. Body shape and posture are very easy to tell apart, at least for me. Look at the things like the hair as well, most OW spiders dont have long hair, look at A behlei long hair. Hope this helps.

Sincerely,

Brandon
 

kellygirl

Arachnoprince
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Sep 1, 2002
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It goes minax, pulchra, behlei. The last one is obvious--look at the setae on the abdomen. You can look at body structure on the first one and tell it's no Grammostola.

kellygirl
 

Mojo Jojo

Arachnoking
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1: Haplopelma minax: Looks like a haplopelma -- somewhat creamy abdomen with light chevrons -- carapace is typical of haplopelmas -- you will know a haplo. when you see one.

2 and 3 -- I'm not sure -- I would say that 2 is pulchra because 3 has red setae on its abdomen and pulchra doesn't.

JOn
 

Bry

Arachnodemon
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Mar 22, 2003
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773
Okay, I overlooked the red setae on the behlei. I can see that difference. But, what do you guys mean by posture and body shape and structure? Elaborate, please. I know it sounds ignorant, but, I can't tell the difference. If a guy were to sell me an H. minax labeled as a G. pulchra, I would probably believe him. Then I'd get home wondering why the G. pulchra is trying to rip my face off. I suppose I will learn.

Bry
 

Mojo Jojo

Arachnoking
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Originally posted by Bry
Okay, I overlooked the red setae on the behlei. I can see that difference. But, what do you guys mean by posture and body shape and structure? Elaborate, please. I know it sounds ignorant, but, I can't tell the difference. If a guy were to sell me an H. minax labeled as a G. pulchra, I would probably believe him. Then I'd get home wondering why the G. pulchra is trying to rip my face off. I suppose I will learn.

Bry
Listen grasshopper, this is something that will come to you in time as you really spend time looking at pictures and raising spiders. I tell you what, go look at every spider that is a haplopelma on Rick West's site:

http://birdspiders.com/archive_listings.html#H

You will notice that all are pretty much marked the same but the colors are different.


Jon


Oh yeah, while your at it, bookmark this site and look at all species on a semi regular basis.

Oh, and when you are thinking about purchasing a new spider -- take a look through it again to see if there is a species that looks particularly good to you, then ask a question on the board about it -- to see if its care needs and temperment are something that you would like. Look at it some more. Take a look at the major dealers listed on this site to see if they are selling it and have pictures of it. Maybe type the scientific name in a google image search to see lots of different pics...

You WILL eventually get pretty good.

Jon
 
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Code Monkey

Arachnoemperor
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Jul 22, 2002
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Originally posted by Bry
But, what do you guys mean by posture and body shape and structure? Elaborate, please. I know it sounds ignorant, but, I can't tell the difference.
Dragonfly is largely right, but here's some pointers: look at the first pair of legs on the minax, see how thick the femur and such is. Look at the abdomen and see how it's smaller than a new worlder, but not shrunken - it's plump, just much smaller. Look at how the ceph is elongated. Those features, along with other characters, is "clearly" an Asian build, and more specificically a Haplopelma build (I'm actually not too hot at telling many of the Asian genera apart, but I can definitely spot an Asian T when I see one).

In addition to the setae, Aphonopelma have a characteristic shape to the carapace - that front triangle is generally more prominent than the similar in appearance Grammostola and Brachypelma.
 

Haploman

ArachnoEarthTiger
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Aug 25, 2002
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hey

ya mentioned haplo hehehehe heres an easier step determine if its old world T and a new world T.

Old world T "eastern hemisphere"-- are much smoother doesnt even have long hairs and arent hair flickers but I did have seen in King baboons and phoneyusa celeraei stick their butt in the air to want to flick hair. I never known a old world T without having an aggressive attitude. not for the beginner

new world T "western hemisphere"- really hairy, longer hairs and on the butt they have hairs that would make ya itch etc. and on some they have a bald spot and there are alot more good beginner species to start with if you love to handle them
 

Bry

Arachnodemon
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Mar 22, 2003
Messages
773
Thanks for the help guys. :)

Haplo, I'm already aware that Old World Ts are typically more aggressive than New World Ts. I was referring to looking at pictures, where you can't tell the temperament of a T. Unless of course, the pic is taken of the T in a threat posture. :D

Bry
 
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