My T broke her leg!!

Vanessa

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I thought about that as Ive heard a thump here & there, although she's pretty good about holding on. I thought I had enough substrate but she seems to enjoy climbing more than walking, so I thought I would give her more space to climb.
You will need to double the amount of substrate or move her to a much shallower enclosure. That is far too far for her to fall considering that she is a smaller tarantula.
Excessive climbing often means that there is something wrong with the substrate. Please make sure that it is not damp or wet for her species.
 

Jon B

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I thought about that as Ive heard a thump here & there, although she's pretty good about holding on. I thought I had enough substrate but she seems to enjoy climbing more than walking, so I thought I would give her more space to climb.
It's on the way down they have trouble, sometimes they will loose their grip and fall flat on their ass. Or they will slowly slide down the walls of the enclosure all cool like
( •_•)>⌐■-■
(⌐■_■) deal with it.
Anyway here's a potato quality picture of my enclosure, and atm she sits on top of her burrow and just relaxes all cool.
 

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Toxoderidae

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Okay, @Tatarita

Your tarantula does not "enjoy" anything. Euathlus are just a genus that are far more outgoing and fearless than really, any other. I personally have never kept Euathlus, but plan to, but when I asked for a picture I meant of the ventral side of the abdomen (belly) as @Jon B and other members said, give your spider more substrate.

FYI: Spiders can not, and never will be able to learn, enjoy, or feel any emotion (at least primitive mygalomorphs like these) your knee is about as advanced as their brain is. The "brain" of a spider is nothing more of a collection of nerves to have kind of a mothership for movement to be controlled. Many primitive arthropods are like this, and that's why you can decapitate many species of insects and they will still act like nothing happened, the head and "brain" aren't really needed, just there as a sensory object.
 

EulersK

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I thought about that as Ive heard a thump here & there, although she's pretty good about holding on. I thought I had enough substrate but she seems to enjoy climbing more than walking, so I thought I would give her more space to climb.
Children love to climb, but putting them in a warehouse full of monkey bars will eventually lead to a broken neck.

As has been said, if it's constantly climbing, then something is wrong in your enclosure. How humid are you keeping it in there? How often are you misting/moistening? When spiders climb like what you're describing, it usually means that it's far too humid. Your spider is terrestrial, it shouldn't be climbing at all.

There are three main types of tarantulas: arboreals (lives in the trees), terrestrials (lives on the ground), and burrowers (lives under the ground). The only one out of those that should ever be climbing are the arboreals. If your terrestrial or burrower is climbing, then that's its way of telling you that it doesn't like something in the enclosure.
 

viper69

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This all could have been prevented if the owner had read more about T husbandry and basic tarantula neurobiology that one can find here on the forum in many threads. The owner was obviously confused on the latter.

This is a beautiful T and likely will recover just fine provided the owner does his/her homework, otherwise this T will suffer another issue.

It's nice to see an owner providing their T with a water bowl!!
 

Vanessa

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While I absolutely agree that there are endless resources on this forum to learn about limb loss and regeneration and neurobiology - I find that it is often not explained in basic terms at all. Not everyone is going to have a degree in biology and the explanations often require that someone have a degree.
I like to share resources that are easy for everyone - biologist or not - to understand. I find the link I posted is very good at explaining spider hydraulics in layman's terms.
 

viper69

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While I absolutely agree that there are endless resources on this forum to learn about limb loss and regeneration and neurobiology - I find that it is often not explained in basic terms at all. Not everyone is going to have a degree in biology and the explanations often require that someone have a degree.
I like to share resources that are easy for everyone - biologist or not - to understand. I find the link I posted is very good at explaining spider hydraulics in layman's terms.
Did anyone suggest the link you provided wasn't of value?
 

Vanessa

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Did anyone suggest the link you provided wasn't of value?
Not at all. That wasn't what I meant by that comment. It's just that I have read lots of posts and sometimes I can't blame people for not finishing some of them. Sometimes my eyes start to glaze over reading some posts and I have read biology textbooks.
The care information is pretty straight forward and there is no excuse for being here and not knowing how to look after your terrestrial tarantula, but learning about neurology and some of the fascinating aspects of tarantula biology is not so user friendly sometimes.
I can appreciate that people should learn the basic anatomy and biology, but it needs to be fun and not be intimidating for new people to learn.
 

Chris LXXIX

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Children love to climb, but putting them in a warehouse full of monkey bars will eventually lead to a broken neck.
Oh c'mon now my man, we Italians of the '70/'80 grow up as childrens in environment full of those monkey bars in childrens parks and nothing never happened. Those were our games as brats ;-)
 

viper69

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Not at all. That wasn't what I meant by that comment. It's just that I have read lots of posts and sometimes I can't blame people for not finishing some of them. Sometimes my eyes start to glaze over reading some posts and I have read biology textbooks.
The care information is pretty straight forward and there is no excuse for being here and not knowing how to look after your terrestrial tarantula, but learning about neurology and some of the fascinating aspects of tarantula biology is not so user friendly sometimes.
I can appreciate that people should learn the basic anatomy and biology, but it needs to be fun and not be intimidating for new people to learn.
I think what Eulers wrote was pretty sufficient regarding T neurobiology. I don't think one needs to read primary literature, ie scientific papers, at all like some of us do in order to keep Ts successfully. I think the issue is too many owners make assumptions (like when I read "my T loves to sit on my hand/knee) and don't bother to do a SIMPLE google search.

I think some but not all of the owners that make such assumptions do so because they simply aren't thinking.

"My dog/cat/bird likes to sit with me, well my T must like that too because the other 3 do." I've seen people write something like that, and it clearly indicates an assumption on their part without any thinking. They are all animals, but they are very different.
 

Tatarita

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Children love to climb, but putting them in a warehouse full of monkey bars will eventually lead to a broken neck.

As has been said, if it's constantly climbing, then something is wrong in your enclosure. How humid are you keeping it in there? How often are you misting/moistening? When spiders climb like what you're describing, it usually means that it's far too humid. Your spider is terrestrial, it shouldn't be climbing at all.

There are three main types of tarantulas: arboreals (lives in the trees), terrestrials (lives on the ground), and burrowers (lives under the ground). The only one out of those that should ever be climbing are the arboreals. If your terrestrial or burrower is climbing, then that's its way of telling you that it doesn't like something in the enclosure.
I don't mist it. She likes it dry. Its all dry except around her water dish where the water overflows. I use cocofiber and its clean. She also does not burrow but likes to sleep in her cave. I put in some moist sphagnum moss a few weeks ago and she avoided it altogether until it dried. She doesnt ONLY climb- she wander around everywhere.
 

EulersK

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I don't mist it. She likes it dry. Its all dry except around her water dish where the water overflows. I use cocofiber and its clean. She also does not burrow but likes to sleep in her cave. I put in some moist sphagnum moss a few weeks ago and she avoided it altogether until it dried. She doesnt ONLY climb- she wander around everywhere.
I believe that you missed my point. You need to raise that substrate.
 

EulersK

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Nope, i got raising the substrate but you asked about moisture & humidity.
I also said that it's wandering because something is wrong, but it seems as if you've answered your own question. You offered damp moss, and it avoided the moss like the plague. Drop the humidity, it's wandering because it's trying to get out.
 

Tatarita

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I also said that it's wandering because something is wrong, but it seems as if you've answered your own question. You offered damp moss, and it avoided the moss like the plague. Drop the humidity, it's wandering because it's trying to get out.
Like I said, I tried a little moist sphagnum a while back but I keep it very dry. i made that quite clear.
 

EulersK

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Like I said, I tried a little moist sphagnum a while back but I keep it very dry. i made that quite clear.
Its all dry except around her water dish where the water overflows.
Well, no, you don't keep it very dry. You said that you overflow the water dish, and you said that it wanders everywhere. Like I said, it's trying to get away. You already live in a humid environment, no need to provide more humidity. A content spider does not wander to the extent you're describing, pure and simple (mature males aside). A content terrestrial doesn't try to climb, either. These are not entertaining pets like mammals or fish - you know you're doing it right when they're a bit boring.

Spiders also roam for various reasons. Right before a molt, right after a molt, right after a rehouse, when it's too humid, when it's too dry, when they're looking for an appropriate hide, when they're looking for a water dish, etc etc etc.
 
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