My spider is molting for the first time! Help!

AnonymousFish

Arachnopeon
Active Member
Joined
Nov 25, 2019
Messages
34
Okay, it’s probably not the first time, but the first time since they’ve been in my care. They buried themselves in a log and stayed there for about two days. Then they would switch from coming out to going back in. Now they’re out and have a bald spot on their butt! I know this is a sign of molting, but I’m not sure if this 100% means that. Is there anything I can do for them in this stage? Should I continue to feed them?
 

Thekla

Arachnoprince
Arachnosupporter
Joined
Oct 13, 2017
Messages
1,538
A bald spot doesn't mean it's going to moult. It just means your T kicked hairs. ;) It might prepare to moult and disperse its setae to deter predators. Or it got stressed/irritated and that's why it kicked hairs. Or it just kicked hairs because it can... ;)

To answer your question if your T is in premoult (because that's what the stage before the actual moult is called), we need more information:

What species is it?
How big is it?
When did it last eat?
Picture of the T?

In this thread, you find a nice overview of all the signs of premoult up to the actual moult: https://arachnoboards.com/threads/tarantula-information-for-beginners-and-more.318718/
 

Poonjab

Arachnobaron
Active Member
Joined
Nov 4, 2019
Messages
353
Having a bald spot doesn’t 100% mean they are going to molt. If the bald spot starts to turn dark in coloration and the abdomen is very plump all while refusing food, these are some key indicators that a molt is approaching. Some will eat all the way up to a molt. My H.pulchipes did. Just make sure the water dish is full and husbandry requirements are being met. Proceed with normal care.
 

AnonymousFish

Arachnopeon
Active Member
Joined
Nov 25, 2019
Messages
34
A bald spot doesn't mean it's going to moult. It just means your T kicked hairs. ;) It might prepare to moult and disperse its setae to deter predators. Or it got stressed/irritated and that's why it kicked hairs. Or it just kicked hairs because it can... ;)

To answer your question if your T is in premoult (because that's what the stage before the actual moult is called), we need more information:

What species is it?
How big is it?
When did it last eat?
Picture of the T?

In this thread, you find a nice overview of all the signs of premoult up to the actual moult: https://arachnoboards.com/threads/tarantula-information-for-beginners-and-more.318718/
I cant get a pic at the moment but they are a curly hair. I would say almost adult size (4 inches?) they eat once every week. so about four days ago. :)

Having a bald spot doesn’t 100% mean they are going to molt. If the bald spot starts to turn dark in coloration and the abdomen is very plump all while refusing food, these are some key indicators that a molt is approaching. Some will eat all the way up to a molt. My H.pulchipes did. Just make sure the water dish is full and husbandry requirements are being met. Proceed with normal care.
Thank you so much! She's been hiding a lot more than usual lately while donning that bald spot. This is what lead me to think she may be molting
 
Last edited by a moderator:

PidderPeets

Arachnoprince
Arachnosupporter
Joined
May 27, 2017
Messages
1,179
I cant get a pic at the moment but they are a curly hair. I would say almost adult size (4 inches?) they eat once every week. so about four days ago. :)
You're feeding a T that large on a weekly basis? Yikes! :eek: Hopefully they're very small feeders. With large Ts, most don't even need to eat monthly. Many will continue to eat because they're opportunistic (some will, others won't), but it can actually make things quite risky for them if they keep eating. Adults don't molt as often as slings, so if they eat too much, they're overweight for much longer. And a tarantula with an overweight abdomen is at an increased risk for drag injuries or abdomen ruptures if it were to climb and fall. The longer it's overweight, the longer you have to worry about those risks.

That's why many on here suggest not adhering too strictly to a feeding schedule. It works better with slings since they molt much more frequently, but as they grow, it's not the best for them.

Regardless, congrats on your new T! You picked a great species!
 

AnonymousFish

Arachnopeon
Active Member
Joined
Nov 25, 2019
Messages
34
Thank you for being polite and nice about it! All of the advice I’ve read says once a week. Which is what their EBC392E8-A8E1-49AD-8BF9-F85DD02277C8.jpeg schedule is right now. Every Thursday. (Sometimes a day or two late if I’m out of the house) and here’s a picture of them. Had her since right before winter nowI think?
 

jaw6053

Arachnosquire
Arachnosupporter
Joined
Dec 1, 2019
Messages
127
Thank you for being polite and nice about it! All of the advice I’ve read says once a week. Which is what their View attachment 335641 schedule is right now. Every Thursday. (Sometimes a day or two late if I’m out of the house) and here’s a picture of them. Had her since right before winter nowI think?
How about some better pictures and a pic of your entire enclosure ?
 

PidderPeets

Arachnoprince
Arachnosupporter
Joined
May 27, 2017
Messages
1,179
Thank you for being polite and nice about it! All of the advice I’ve read says once a week. Which is what their View attachment 335641 schedule is right now. Every Thursday. (Sometimes a day or two late if I’m out of the house) and here’s a picture of them. Had her since right before winter nowI think?
There used to be a bit more emphasis on feeding schedules, even on here (at least that's how it seemed to me when I was new). I remember I used to feel guilty admitting I wasn't feeding on a set schedule with the older Ts, but most of mine would refuse to eat that often. Tarantulas have ridiculously slow metabolisms, so even months without food is not an issue for chunky ones. So don't worry if it won't eat for a bit
 

Ellenantula

Arachnoking
Arachnosupporter
Joined
Sep 14, 2014
Messages
2,005
I think the OP only has one T. I believe they were using the pronouns "they" and "them" because they were unsure of the sex
Ah -- thanks. And I couldn't tell by photo either (looked like two - one vertical, one horizontal - sigh). I probably need to embiggen pictures before typing out the first thing that comes into my head.
 

Thekla

Arachnoprince
Arachnosupporter
Joined
Oct 13, 2017
Messages
1,538
I cant get a pic at the moment but they are a curly hair. I would say almost adult size (4 inches?) they eat once every week. so about four days ago. :)
Well, if she's still eating she's definitely not in premoult. With your feeding schedule, I'd expect a very long premoult/fasting period before she'll actually moult. ;) So, as others have said already... feed her less, one prey item every 2-3 weeks should be enough. She seems plump and healthy, she could go months without any feeding at all. Just make sure the water dish is full.

And could you please post a picture of the entire enclosure. Just to make sure there's nothing amiss. :)
 
Top