My scorpion isn’t acting “normal”

ashenlogan

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Nov 26, 2021
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I’ve had my scorpion for around four and a half months. She’s an Asian Forest scorpion (Heterometrus Petersii) and is roughly around 2 years old.

For around the past month, maybe longer, she hasn’t been acting herself. It seems that she very rarely comes out anymore. Usually I’d hear her scuttling around at night and find substrate in her water bowl which shows that she’s been out of her hide and whatnot. But she’s stopped doing all of her normal things.

She practically refuses to eat now. Sometimes she appears scared of the food but most of the time she just freezes and completely ignores it. Whether the food is in my tweezers or it’s moving around her on the floor, she just won’t have it. I’m not sure exactly when the last time she ate was since in the end (2-4 weeks ago) I just dropped a few mealworms into her enclosure and hoped for the best because I didn’t know else what to do.

In the time that I’ve owned her, she hasn’t shown any signs of molting or pregnancy. (I’m not sure if pregnancy has anything to do with this.)

Her tank is normally around 20°C - 25°C (68°F - 77°F) and her humidity is between 60% -70%.

If anyone has any advice then that would be great! Thank you! :)
 

Dry Desert

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I’ve had my scorpion for around four and a half months. She’s an Asian Forest scorpion (Heterometrus Petersii) and is roughly around 2 years old.

For around the past month, maybe longer, she hasn’t been acting herself. It seems that she very rarely comes out anymore. Usually I’d hear her scuttling around at night and find substrate in her water bowl which shows that she’s been out of her hide and whatnot. But she’s stopped doing all of her normal things.

She practically refuses to eat now. Sometimes she appears scared of the food but most of the time she just freezes and completely ignores it. Whether the food is in my tweezers or it’s moving around her on the floor, she just won’t have it. I’m not sure exactly when the last time she ate was since in the end (2-4 weeks ago) I just dropped a few mealworms into her enclosure and hoped for the best because I didn’t know else what to do.

In the time that I’ve owned her, she hasn’t shown any signs of molting or pregnancy. (I’m not sure if pregnancy has anything to do with this.)

Her tank is normally around 20°C - 25°C (68°F - 77°F) and her humidity is between 60% -70%.

If anyone has any advice then that would be great! Thank you! :)
Firstly you want to remove any uneaten mealworms just incase it's due for a molt, as any mealworms left in will eat a molting scorpion.
Secondly raise the temperature upto 28 - 30c, before <edit> on here tell you 20c is fine, then if not due for a molt, it should start eating again.
 
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darkness975

Latrodectus
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I’ve had my scorpion for around four and a half months. She’s an Asian Forest scorpion (Heterometrus Petersii) and is roughly around 2 years old.

For around the past month, maybe longer, she hasn’t been acting herself. It seems that she very rarely comes out anymore. Usually I’d hear her scuttling around at night and find substrate in her water bowl which shows that she’s been out of her hide and whatnot. But she’s stopped doing all of her normal things.

She practically refuses to eat now. Sometimes she appears scared of the food but most of the time she just freezes and completely ignores it. Whether the food is in my tweezers or it’s moving around her on the floor, she just won’t have it. I’m not sure exactly when the last time she ate was since in the end (2-4 weeks ago) I just dropped a few mealworms into her enclosure and hoped for the best because I didn’t know else what to do.

In the time that I’ve owned her, she hasn’t shown any signs of molting or pregnancy. (I’m not sure if pregnancy has anything to do with this.)

Her tank is normally around 20°C - 25°C (68°F - 77°F) and her humidity is between 60% -70%.

If anyone has any advice then that would be great! Thank you! :)
20 C is low for them. You don't really want it to drop below 24 C for the best growth and care. They will survive lower temps but they won't thrive and eventually it will affect their growth since their metabolism will slow down.
 

Joey Spijkers

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As others have said, it’s likely the temperature. You’re probably only noticing this behavior now because it’s getting into the colder months.
 

Albireo Wulfbooper

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Humidity is a useless measure - it only tells you what’s happening in the air. Is the substrate moist all the way to the bottom?

If it’s too cold, too dry, or if the animal is nearing a moult, this kind of behaviour will result.

20° is at the low end of the tolerant range, but you mentioned it’s 20-25° - if that’s a day/night split then temperature is not likely a problem. If what you mean is that it’s 25 in summer and 20 in winter, then yes, the animal will have decreased metabolism during those cooler months, which means less activity, reduced appetite.
It’s important to note that reduced activity and appetite are not in themselves necessarily indicators of a problem, but they *can* be symptoms. They can also be completely normal seasonal behaviour changes or indicators of an impending moult. Don’t panic, but do ensure that the substrate is well moistened, and that uneaten prey are removed.
 

Dry Desert

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Humidity is a useless measure - it only tells you what’s happening in the air. Is the substrate moist all the way to the bottom?

If it’s too cold, too dry, or if the animal is nearing a moult, this kind of behaviour will result.

20° is at the low end of the tolerant range, but you mentioned it’s 20-25° - if that’s a day/night split then temperature is not likely a problem. If what you mean is that it’s 25 in summer and 20 in winter, then yes, the animal will have decreased metabolism during those cooler months, which means less activity, reduced appetite.
It’s important to note that reduced activity and appetite are not in themselves necessarily indicators of a problem, but they *can* be symptoms. They can also be completely normal seasonal behaviour changes or indicators of an impending moult. Don’t panic, but do ensure that the substrate is well moistened, and that uneaten prey are removed.
After seeing your insistence on recommending 20-23c is being an ideal temperature for forest scorpions, I spent a great deal of time yesterday referencing every site I could find.
All American sites ALL say 75-90 F. The main UK dealers sites recommend 26 - 28 C.

<edit>
 
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Albireo Wulfbooper

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After seeing your insistence on recommending 20-23c is being an ideal temperature for forest scorpions, I spent a great deal of time yesterday referencing every site I could find.
All American sites ALL say 75-90 F. The main UK dealers sites recommend 26 - 28 C.

<edit>
At no point have I insisted or even stated that 20-23° is “ideal”, nor have I recommended it. I have very clearly stated that their metabolism and activity levels are reduced at this temperature range. I have simply acknowledged the reality that a great many people successfully keep Heterometrus at room temperature, without noticeable deficits in health or growth. I have also pointed out quite accurately that throughout much of their range, Heterometrus experience winter temperatures that are equivalent to this room temperature range, so they are equipped to deal with this.
 
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ashenlogan

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Sorry it’s such a late reply, I’ve been busy :/ but I upped the temperature the other week and over the past good few days she’s come out and started exploring again. Everything else appears to be normal apart from her eating. I’ve offered her food every other day but she just keeps turning it down. She kind of just makes herself really small and hides away from the food. I’ve been offering her mealworms and morio worms which I know she used to eat before. (Also I forgot to mention last time that all uneaten food had been removed from her tank).

So I’m still not too sure what to do on that side of things.
 

Albireo Wulfbooper

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Sorry it’s such a late reply, I’ve been busy :/ but I upped the temperature the other week and over the past good few days she’s come out and started exploring again. Everything else appears to be normal apart from her eating. I’ve offered her food every other day but she just keeps turning it down. She kind of just makes herself really small and hides away from the food. I’ve been offering her mealworms and morio worms which I know she used to eat before. (Also I forgot to mention last time that all uneaten food had been removed from her tank).

So I’m still not too sure what to do on that side of things.
it’s not unusual for them to sometimes refuse food for long periods. If it’s not skinny, don’t worry about it
 
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