My Odd Little Thrixopelma ockerti

Vanessa

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I have had my little T. ockerti for some time now. They were about 1" when I got them, they've moulted once, and they are now about 1.25".
Before they moulted, they were in a tall vial with more than half of the vial filled with substrate. They had made a deep burrow that they spent a lot of their time in. Then they moulted and their behaviour seemed to change. After their moult they were always found on the side, or even right up at the top of the vial and I didn't see them use their burrow anymore.
After a couple of weeks of watching them, I decided to rehouse them into a larger enclosure with more floor space, but didn't fill it with as much substrate as I would a terrestrial and gave them plastic plants. I thought they might becoming more of the arboreal that they will be as an adult. Since the rehouse, they spend their time on the side of the enclosure - the same as prior to the rehouse.
They are eating very well and have an extremely good feeding response. I was taken aback by how aggressive they are with their food. I am pleased that they seem to be happy.
When did people start observing the change in their behaviour from a burrower to a more arboreal type?
Here they are tonight after being fed - you can see the cricket milkshake going down into their little belly. They have made pretty quick work of that cricket, because it wasn't that tiny. They are taking fairly large prey for their size.
They are very lovely looking spiderlings and I have not seen any defensive type of behaviour from them... yet.
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viper69

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@cold blood

What say you my man, you own them.

My impression has always been they are terrestrial w/the same "semi-arboreal" tendencies sometimes displayed by GBBs. I also don't ready that much about this species either.

They are certainly built like terrestrials.
 

Vanessa

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What I've read is that people observed a higher level of skittishness/defensiveness when they were housed as a strict terrestrial, that seemed to lessen once they were provided a setup that was leaning more toward being arboreal. Another comment that I read, and I thought it was here but could be wrong, was that they were definitely arboreal. I can't remember exactly where I read that one.
My plan, as an adult, is to house them in a front opening exo-terra that measures 12x12x12, with the screen top replaced with acrylic and lots of places to climb and be off the floor. I guess leaning more towards being arboreal, with a bit more floor space than a strict arboreal. Giving them more of a choice to be both if that makes them happy.
That is my plan so far, but it is a long way off.
 

viper69

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Giving them more of a choice to be both if that makes them happy.
I don't think much is known about this species in the wild to be honest, I could be wrong. I've heard both land/tree statements about them, semi as well. They sure aren't built like a true arboreal from what I have seen. The NW and OW arboreals I'm familiar with the best (exceptions??) all have enlarged scopula.

I think your idea is a good one. Storm did a multilevel setup for his female N. incei and she used both levels. They are terrestrial.

Perhaps they live a few feet above ground in tree trunks? I've seen that Ts who live like this are characterized as arboreal.
 

EulersK

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I don't think much is known about this species in the wild to be honest, I could be wrong. I've heard both land/tree statements about them, semi as well. They sure aren't built like a true arboreal from what I have seen. The NW and OW arboreals I'm familiar with the best (exceptions??) all have enlarged scopula.

I think your idea is a good one. Storm did a multilevel setup for his female N. incei and she used both levels. They are terrestrial.

Perhaps they live a few feet above ground in tree trunks? I've seen that Ts who live like this are characterized as arboreal.
If you look at H. maculata's in the wild, many have built elaborate webbing within the bases of bushes. They are certainly built like an arboreal, but spend plenty of time at ground level. All of mine treat vertical space as their hide - they web it up, but their hunting behavior is always at their bottom web tube. For an arboreal, they spend a lot of time on the ground.
 

viper69

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If you look at H. maculata's in the wild, many have built elaborate webbing within the bases of bushes. They are certainly built like an arboreal, but spend plenty of time at ground level. All of mine treat vertical space as their hide - they web it up, but their hunting behavior is always at their bottom web tube. For an arboreal, they spend a lot of time on the ground.
You know that's interesting. I've owned an H. mac, and that was similar to my own at times. I had almost forgotten about her. Striking colors!
 

EulersK

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You know that's interesting. I've owned an H. mac, and that was similar to my own at times. I had almost forgotten about her. Striking colors!
Speaking of, do you know of color morphs within this species? Some are nearly snow-white, and others are a drab brown. It's not due to sexual dimorphism, as I've seen two females exhibit this coloration.
 

viper69

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Speaking of, do you know of color morphs within this species? Some are nearly snow-white, and others are a drab brown. It's not due to sexual dimorphism, as I've seen two females exhibit this coloration.
I don't. Mine was snow-white. It really stood out.
 

Kymura

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I started mine in a semi arboreal set up and even as a tiny sling it stayed on the bark. Finally burrowed slightly after their first molt, at that time set dirt webs as curtains all around a low piece of the bark and used it as her(?) hide.
Mines big and gorgeous now. (S)he still has a dirt Web teepee sort of spot at the base of the bark but stretches out on the bark more times then not. This particular spider I see drink often. Skittish but not defensive unless your trying to move her. Love the attitude displays with the raised abdomen.
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Vanessa

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That was the impression I got from reading and the advice that you gave me - that they prefer being elevated. I am planning on giving them that option when they are larger. The same option as your photo.
Mine are in a semi-arboreal type spiderling setup now. It allows for them to be on the ground, or off it. It was just strange that they seemed to do a complete 180 after their first moult and came out of the ground and right up to the top.
 

cold blood

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Despite their outward appearance of being terrestrial, there is no doubt they are indeed an arboreal species. I've always housed mine almost as I would an avic, but I do give them more floor space (although I do this with avic, too). With their speed and incredible prey drive, they have no issues with extra room, so I try to give them extra room. Being that I house them without deep substrate, I can say I have never seen a single one burrow at all. Sometimes they are on the ground, but most of the time they are elevated on their wood, even as 1/2" slings.

One of the more skittish species I have worked with.
 
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Vanessa

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Deleted my question because I should have reread one of the responses I already received.
 
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KezyGLA

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Awsome species. Semi arboreal for sure. Mine can be found burrowing while in pre-molt. Then after a molt I see him out on the web he has made between cork bark and plants.

I find mine very similar to my Chromatopelma cyaneopubescens. The Eating response is also like my Chromatopelma cyaneopubescens. They even look quite similar. It just doesn't match the speed, although I may just not have seen that yet.

A good T to have in the collection for sure! :D
 

cold blood

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I
Awsome species. Semi arboreal for sure. Mine can be found burrowing while in pre-molt. Then after a molt I see him out on the web he has made between cork bark and plants.

I find mine very similar to my Chromatopelma cyaneopubescens. The Eating response is also like my Chromatopelma cyaneopubescens. They even look quite similar. It just doesn't match the speed, although I may just not have seen that yet.

A good T to have in the collection for sure! :D
I find okerti to be faster than GBB....much more skittish, too. I also see GBB as 100% terrestrial.
 

KezyGLA

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I

I find okerti to be faster than GBB....much more skittish, too. I also see GBB as 100% terrestrial.
Well it goes to show how different individuals within the genus can be from each other. I would say my okteri is skittish but doesnt bolt as quick as my GBB.

When my GBB was younger it was very grounded but now I see it climbing about all over everything aha
 

cold blood

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Well it goes to show how different individuals within the genus can be from each other. I would say my okteri is skittish but doesnt bolt as quick as my GBB.

When my GBB was younger it was very grounded but now I see it climbing about all over everything aha
Any t will "climb all over everything" if you give them vertical space, which is precisely why we limit that vertical space with terrestrials.
 

viper69

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I have some interesting information regarding GBBs in their natural habitat. Stay tuned for a post in the Science section.
 

KezyGLA

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Any t will "climb all over everything" if you give them vertical space, which is precisely why we limit that vertical space with terrestrials.
I meant that I see it climbing on plants more or sitting in its hammock. I see it sitting on the plants a lot more than on the sub.
 
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