My next 3 T's

antsman

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These are the T's I'm hoping to get. They are all dryer loving species correct?

Pterinochilus murinus 1/2"
Grammostola pulchra 3/4"
Aphonopelma seemanni 1/2"
 

nicodimus22

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The G. pulchra seems perfectly happy on bone dry substrate as long as you keep the water dish topped off. I'll let people who have owned the others comment on them.
 

Hellblazer

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I keep P. murinus dry, but I give my A. seemanni more moisture than my other Aphonopelmas.
 

ChrisTy

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I started out keeping my A seemani drier and it constantly seemed stress. I bumped up the moisture and mine has done much better and currently excavating a ton! So in my experience the seemani at least needs to be in moist substrate. Best way to tell is wet down half of the enclosure and keep the other half dry. See where it chooses to be and you'll have a good range of what your individual likes best. Good luck with the new additions. Great choices.
 

Rittdk01

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A seemani likes a bit of humidity. Mine sat IN his water dish before I bumped up the humidity.
 

antsman

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Ok, thanks everyone. I'll get a more humid enclosure ready for the Aphonopelma seemanni, the other two I'll keep the same as my Grammostola poteri.
 

Andrea82

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You do realize that going from a B.albopilosum and G.porteri to a P.murinus is a HUGE leap right?
Especially since you had quite some questions on the care and maintenance...
 

antsman

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You do realize that going from a B.albopilosum and G.porteri to a P.murinus is a HUGE leap right?
Especially since you had quite some questions on the care and maintenance...
Yes, I see your concern. But being that the other four are more docile, I wanted something with spunk. I fully understand they are very fast, and very hostile and they grow large. I appreciate the concern.
I am hoping to build a hide with a sliding door to lock it in when cleaning, or being in the enclosure.
 

Andrea82

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Yes, I see your conIern. But being that the other four are more docile, I wanted something with spunk. I fully understand they are very fast, and very hostile and they grow large. I appreciate the concern.
I am hoping to build a hide with a sliding door to lock it in when cleaning, or being in the enclosure.
'build a hide with a locking door to lock it in'
There's something i never heard before. I appreciate the creativity, however there are some flaws in that plan.
1. You assume it will take up residence in said hide. This is by no means certain.
2. You assume you are faster than the P.murinus, and will be able to lock it before it gets out. You won't.Not without risking legs/bodyparts of the spider.

I am not trying to be mean, but if you think you need a contraption of this sort to keep this species, maybe you are not ready at all.
If you want something with more spunk, look up Phormictopus genus, Ephebopus, Psalmopoeus. All NW, all defensive and fast, but without the potent venom.
Or if you insist on an OW, look into Ceratogyrus or Augacephalus genus.
I really hope you'll reconsider....keeping a species you are not ready for is no fun at all.
 

Hellblazer

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There's a good chance your hide with a sliding door would get covered with web and substrate and not function. Also, if you're that worried about dealing with it you should probably wait until you're more confident.
 
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antsman

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I should have listened from the beginning thanks a lot guys. After reading about the bites I have reconsidered, I was misinformed badly.
I have since switched it to a Phormictopus cancerides. And yes I agree the door was a silly idea, but I was thinking.
 

Andrea82

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I should have listened from the beginning thanks a lot guys. After reading about the bites I have reconsidered, I was misinformed badly.
I have since switched it to a Phormictopus cancerides. And yes I agree the door was a silly idea, but I was thinking.
Awesome! I think you'll find that this species has all the spunk you can handle in the beginning :D
What size are you getting?
 

KezyGLA

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I dont know why people keep P. murinus so dry..

.. I believe a famous song said that it rain down in Africa xD.

Just because these species (A. seemanni and G. pulchra included) can be kept dry, it doesnt mean that they love it that way. One would think they appreciate a little moisture and humidity now and then.
 

nicodimus22

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Just because these species (A. seemanni and G. pulchra included) can be kept dry, it doesnt mean that they love it that way. One would think they appreciate a little moisture and humidity now and then.
Whenever I overflowed the water dish, my G. pulchra would stay at the other end of the cage until the substrate had dried out. Maybe it was just my specimen, but it didn't seem to like the places where the sub was moist. Just trying to read the behavior and act accordingly.
 

KezyGLA

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Whenever I overflowed the water dish, my G. pulchra would stay at the other end of the cage until the substrate had dried out. Maybe it was just my specimen, but it didn't seem to like the places where the sub was moist. Just trying to read the behavior and act accordingly.
Maybe. I know they are scrubland species but it still rains in scrublands. And with G. pulchra rainfall helps the breeding cycle.

Every pulchra I own with either flip over water dish and sit over the moist sub or fill it up and soak up the water into the sub and sit there. This happens with my specimens regularly. I have also noticed them using dish to moisten the sub then block up ventilation holes. Having observed this I would think they enjoy a bit of hunidity.

I guess it has a lot to do with where you live the conditions in your home too.

Pulchra isnt really the one that I'm getting at though. I have read so many people dishing out care tips for P. murinus saying that the sub should be bone dry and they should be kept like GBB :confused:

P. murinus is found in a vast area of Africa spaning a few countries. The most common varient in the hobby is the Usambara orange locality. These are found in some of the greenest mountainous areas of central Africa where there is regular heavy rainfall. Of course the odd time it can go dry for a very long too but its not like it isnt humid there or the other localities. o_O

Orange Baboon habitat region at Usambara mountains -

https://s27.postimg.org/6l4q93htf/IMG_6861.jpg

I can understand the dry plateaus of Chile and Venezuela and their arid species but not why most people think P. murinus and quite a lot think P. muticus should be kept dry too.

Just confusing is all.
 
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Hellblazer

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Pulchra isnt really the one that I'm getting at though. I have read so many people dishing out care tips for P. murinus saying that the sub should be bone dry and they should be kept like GBB :confused:

P. murinus is found in a vast area of Africa spaning a few countries. The most common varient in the hobby is the Usambara orange locality. These are found in some of the greenest mountainous areas of central Africa where there is regular heavy rainfall. Of course the odd time it can go dry for a very long too but its not like it isnt humid there or the other localities. o_O

Orange Baboon habitat region at Usambara mountains -

https://s27.postimg.org/6l4q93htf/IMG_6861.jpg

I can understand the dry plateaus of Chile and Venezuela and their arid species but not why most people think P. murinus and quite a lot think P. muticus should be kept dry too.

Just confusing is all.
Keeping them on dry substrate doesn't necessarily mean people think they're a desert species. Mine have dry substrate and water in their dishes at all times. I keep my avics on fairly dry substrate with a water dish too, but I realize where they come from. That's just what works for me though, maybe there's a better way.
 

KezyGLA

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As adults all three species do well in a dry environment.
Yup. They remain healthy , they eat and they drink. I am not doubting that. I just wonder why so many people are adamant that they be kept dry.

Its like when I first moved to Scotland from the Humid region of Andaluz. I survived but I still hate the cold dry air. It would be the same for a Canadian native to go to Singapore heheh.

Just because they manage doesnt mean they enjoy it. Its just my opinion by the way. I aint looking for a fight...


.. well not yet anyways.
 

Andrea82

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Yup. They remain healthy , they eat and they drink. I am not doubting that. I just wonder why so many people are adamant that they be kept dry.

Its like when I first moved to Scotland from the Humid region of Andaluz. I survived but I still hate the cold dry air. It would be the same for a Canadian native to go to Singapore heheh.

Just because they manage doesnt mean they enjoy it. Its just my opinion by the way. I aint looking for a fight...


.. well not yet anyways.
There is a more humid region than Scotland? :eek:
Seriously, Scotland is supposed to always getting rain right? Or is that a cliche like all Dutch people smoke weed? :p
 
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