My lucky day!

Jake J

Arachnochode
Joined
Sep 12, 2016
Messages
10
Being regulars at a local pet shop, my wife and I are known as the T collectors in town...so when a guy brought them two T's he needed to get rid of because he was moving, they put him in contact with my wife, who said "hell yes, we'll take 'em!" She then let me know the situation, which was that the pet shop wouldn't hold onto them until either of us got to work, and he was leaving like now, so it was now or never. She wasn't able to leave work, but you better believe I was! Got the guy's address, swung by and picked up two FREE new T's during my lunch break.

And they're not the standard, everyone's-got-one, drab-colored T's either. They're two that I've personally never seen in pet shops (although I'm sure plenty of folks on here might find them mundane species, but hey, compared to many of you, I'm still a novice). Just for fun, I'll let some of you pros identify the species for me, and bonus points for taking a stab at gender. I'm pretty sure about one species, not so sure about the other but have an idea. Any species-specific husbandry advice is certainly welcome! I'm excited!

Just realized that the photos are pretty crappy, but I was in a hurry. Might post better pics later.
 

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Flexzone

Arachnodemon
Joined
Mar 1, 2015
Messages
726
P. irminia and the other appears to be a MM N. coloratovillosus, Being mature he'll start winding down and expire in the months to come.
 

magicmed

Arachnobaron
Joined
Jun 4, 2016
Messages
403
I agree with flex zone definitely a psalmopoeus irminia, beautiful T. And the nhandu coloratovilosus.

Great pickups congrats :)
 

Jake J

Arachnochode
Joined
Sep 12, 2016
Messages
10
P. irminia and the other appears to be a MM N. coloratovillosus, Being mature he'll start winding down and expire in the months to come.
Well that makes me sad, but the thought had crossed my mind, as he certainly does appear to be a MM. Hope I get plenty of quality time with him before his time is up. Still seems pretty darn healthy at the moment, so that's somewhat reassuring.
 

Jake J

Arachnochode
Joined
Sep 12, 2016
Messages
10
I agree with flex zone definitely a psalmopoeus irminia, beautiful T. And the nhandu coloratovilosus.

Great pickups congrats :)
Thank you! I think the guy said the common name of black & white, and I haven't yet googled info on that. I had assumed it to be in the brachypelma genus just by the bands on its legs, but that was just an off-hand guess. I have a nhandu chromatus, so this makes my 2nd nhandu!
 

Jake J

Arachnochode
Joined
Sep 12, 2016
Messages
10
So, will the standard arid terrestrial care apply to both?
 

Jake J

Arachnochode
Joined
Sep 12, 2016
Messages
10
No, the Irminia is an arboreal so it needs more vertical space
You know, I've seen brief descriptions of these before and thought I recalled it being an arboreal species, but the guy had it kept in the aquarium in the pic, so I thought I must've been mistaken. I'm a firm believer in researching a bit before purchasing a new species, and it's a bit irritating to know that so many people are too lazy to find out the basics. He mentioned other T's he's owned over the years--makes me wonder how many have died needlessly because they were impulse-buys. Anyways, rest assured this guy (or gal, hopefully) will be moved into a more suitable home.
 

DeanK

Arachnosquire
Joined
Jun 16, 2016
Messages
81
Also I thing the Nhandu genus likes it a little damp
You know, I've seen brief descriptions of these before and thought I recalled it being an arboreal species, but the guy had it kept in the aquarium in the pic, so I thought I must've been mistaken. I'm a firm believer in researching a bit before purchasing a new species, and it's a bit irritating to know that so many people are too lazy to find out the basics. He mentioned other T's he's owned over the years--makes me wonder how many have died needlessly because they were impulse-buys. Anyways, rest assured this guy (or gal, hopefully) will be moved into a more suitable home.
It's amazing how adaptable they are though. The cork tube from the pic will make a nice hide in it's next enclosure. They don't live up high like an avic, they will web and use dirt to make their home lower to the ground
 

Jake J

Arachnochode
Joined
Sep 12, 2016
Messages
10
Also I thing the Nhandu genus likes it a little damp

It's amazing how adaptable they are though. The cork tube from the pic will make a nice hide in it's next enclosure. They don't live up high like an avic, they will web and use dirt to make their home lower to the ground
Good to know. I have a spare Exo-Terra enclosure I was using for an a. avic who died recently :-(
Was planning on keeping the cork bark. After doing some preliminary reading, it seems this is a nervous, flighty species. Will rehousing be a problem?
 

Graves6661

Arachnosquire
Joined
Dec 31, 2015
Messages
86
Irminia is quick so have a catch cup ready just in case. If it decides to stay in the cork bark tube while you rehouse it might make things easier by just transfering the whole piece of cork bark into the new enclosure with the T in it lol
 

Jake J

Arachnochode
Joined
Sep 12, 2016
Messages
10
That's what I was considering...just hoping it doesn't decide to make a leap during the transit if I take that approach. I just read a great write-up by Storm76 (this one) in case you're interested. I think that info will come in handy.
 

14pokies

Arachnoprince
Joined
Oct 25, 2014
Messages
1,706
Good to know. I have a spare Exo-Terra enclosure I was using for an a. avic who died recently :-(
Was planning on keeping the cork bark. After doing some preliminary reading, it seems this is a nervous, flighty species. Will rehousing be a problem?
Irminia can be extremely defensive when disturbed and just as fast.. If you can get a catch cup over her and slide the lid from underneath that is your best bet..
Once she is in the new enclosure partially or fully remove the lid from the catch cup (depends on how crazy she is and how comfortable you are) and let her come out when she is ready.. Wait untill she is tucked in or behind a piece of cork before you remove the catch cup..
Irminia can be a handfull if your not used to fast defensive Ts so just take your time and stay calm..

As stated they prefer a damp and deep substrate.. Don't overdue it though as they are very hardy and can tolerate dryer sub without any problems.. I have raised them both ways..
I noticed that the ones on dryer sub burrowed deeper and were less likely to be seen at the opening of there burrow or out wandering around at night.. Other than that IMO it's a species that can be kept both ways..

Similar to Avics though cross ventilation is important.. It could be hard providing that in an exo-terra.. The problem is compounded by the deep damp soil they prefer.. The side ventilation on exo-terras enclosures is relatively close to the bottom so make sure its not blocked by substrate and later by webbing and substrate..

These guys love cork slabs and tubes but will dig under them so make sure they are placed in the enclosure before you add substrate so she doesn't get squashed while rearranging..

Take good care of her man this one of if not my favorite species..
 

Jake J

Arachnochode
Joined
Sep 12, 2016
Messages
10
Irminia can be extremely defensive when disturbed and just as fast.. If you can get a catch cup over her and slide the lid from underneath that is your best bet..
Once she is in the new enclosure partially or fully remove the lid from the catch cup (depends on how crazy she is and how comfortable you are) and let her come out when she is ready.. Wait untill she is tucked in or behind a piece of cork before you remove the catch cup..
Irminia can be a handfull if your not used to fast defensive Ts so just take your time and stay calm..

As stated they prefer a damp and deep substrate.. Don't overdue it though as they are very hardy and can tolerate dryer sub without any problems.. I have raised them both ways..
I noticed that the ones on dryer sub burrowed deeper and were less likely to be seen at the opening of there burrow or out wandering around at night.. Other than that IMO it's a species that can be kept both ways..

Similar to Avics though cross ventilation is important.. It could be hard providing that in an exo-terra.. The problem is compounded by the deep damp soil they prefer.. The side ventilation on exo-terras enclosures is relatively close to the bottom so make sure its not blocked by substrate and later by webbing and substrate..

These guys love cork slabs and tubes but will dig under them so make sure they are placed in the enclosure before you add substrate so she doesn't get squashed while rearranging..

Take good care of her man this one of if not my favorite species..
That's extremely helpful, thank you very much and I'll definitely follow your advice!
 
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