Moving (to another house) with tarantulas

mctenor

Arachnopeon
Joined
Oct 6, 2021
Messages
2
Hi everyone, my question is pretty straight forward. I just graduated and am moving back to Chicago with my 3 tarantulas 2 juveniles and 1 sling. It's only an hour and a half drive, but I'm wondering would it be best to leave them in their enclosures or pack them like you'd do to ship them? I'm worried about their burrows collapsing on them when driving if I leave them in the enclosures. Please advise. Thank you.
 

magouilles

Arachnoknight
Active Member
Joined
Apr 10, 2020
Messages
201
Hi everyone, my question is pretty straight forward. I just graduated and am moving back to Chicago with my 3 tarantulas 2 juveniles and 1 sling. It's only an hour and a half drive, but I'm wondering would it be best to leave them in their enclosures or pack them like you'd do to ship them? I'm worried about their burrows collapsing on them when driving if I leave them in the enclosures. Please advise. Thank you.
Last year I did many conferences in primary schools to help children with their fears of spiders and to help people better understand them
I brought my own spiders to showcase them
I packed them in their enclosures in huge cardboard boxes
The rides were only around 30 minutes though but no burrows collapsed and nothing went wrong so I believe you could leave them in their enclosures
 

Smotzer

Arachnoemperor
Active Member
Joined
Jan 17, 2020
Messages
3,539
No need to take them out of their enclosures in my eyes, just put them where they can’t move around and don’t go off-roading. They reinforce burrows, burrows easily collapsing is a myth IMO and IME.
 

Tarantuland

Arachnoangel
Active Member
Joined
Mar 19, 2020
Messages
909
I would do something in the middle. One's in deli cups I'd think would be fine. If there's ones in arboreal set ups where a stop short could cause the cork bark to smash the side of the enclosure, just put that spider in a 16 or 32oz deli cup. IMO no need to go to the lengths that you need to set them up for shipping, but you can still make it safer
 

spideyspinneret78

Arachnodemon
Active Member
Joined
Jul 19, 2019
Messages
764
Take heavy objects out of their enclosures so that nothing can roll around and crush them. Then I'd just get some cardboard boxes, secure the enclosure lids, and pack the enclosures inside the box with towels or newspaper between them. I did this for a 14 hour drive when I moved, and had no issues.
 

Craig73

Arachnodemon
Arachnosupporter +
Joined
Jun 2, 2016
Messages
771
I drove a juvenile P. met in its enclosure that traveled 300+ miles, half in a Jeep with the top off (think car but 2x rougher ride and windy) and the other half of the trip in a car. I just packed the enclosure in a box with towels to make sure it didn’t move. Also made sure nothing inside the enclosure looked like it was going to shift.

Ideally transporting that distance would have been packed like if it was being shipped, but I wasn’t about to go that route for obvious reasons cause it would have been way cheaper to ship by mail.
 
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