Most fun tarantulas to keep

Sophiahuling

Arachnopeon
Joined
Oct 19, 2020
Messages
7
I’m new to the hobby and was wondering what are some of the most fun and interesting/active tarantulas to keep?
 

Kichimark

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Aug 8, 2020
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23
Hmmmm I am a big fan of Brachypelma's even though they got the reputation of being pet rocks but they got beautiful colors. My AF B. hamorii doesn't entirely like the pet rock reputation since she tends to move often in the afternoon. I am also really enjoying the Aphonopelma's and just got a small female A. steindachneri which fascinates me even though she does not have the colors of the others that I keep. Probably because she is native and I am digging into the history and what is known of them.

Which ones have you looked at so far and what interest you?
 

Matt Man

Arachnolord
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623
tough question with a multitude of answers
Some Folks value color over everything
Some size
Some love webbers
Some like hyper aggressive eaters
The GBB fills all those categories unless size = HUGE
a Geniculata does most of them
 

cold blood

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Jan 19, 2014
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11,936
For me, its easy....G. pulchripes and T. albopilosus.

4 big reasons i like them over all other beginner species.

1. while neither grow fast, they both grow much faster than most other beginners. This means you learn more faster and get to see them molt a little more often and...

2. Both have top notch appetites.


3. Both tend to be more active, carrying sub around, digging holes and sometimes making burrow systems...but hunger sees them out in the open a lot (like most beginner species).

4. Lastly is cost and availability. Both are important because a first shouldnt be an expensive investment...its your first try afterall.

20201014_224920.jpg 20190816_183118.jpg
 

orchidloveXTM

Arachnosquire
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Aug 11, 2019
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129
This might be a highly contested pick considering how often they are just plain out of view, but feeding Idiothele Mira is 1-2 seconds of fun lol
 

Sophiahuling

Arachnopeon
Joined
Oct 19, 2020
Messages
7
Hmmmm I am a big fan of Brachypelma's even though they got the reputation of being pet rocks but they got beautiful colors. My AF B. hamorii doesn't entirely like the pet rock reputation since she tends to move often in the afternoon. I am also really enjoying the Aphonopelma's and just got a small female A. steindachneri which fascinates me even though she does not have the colors of the others that I keep. Probably because she is native and I am digging into the history and what is known of them.

Which ones have you looked at so far and what interest you?
Ooh cool! Thanks for the info, I’ll check those out. Is the last one native to Southwest US? I have a Nicaragua Curly hair sling and a Cupiennes Salei sling coming in the mail next week. I didn’t want to get ahead of myself but I have experience raising other bugs so I’m not afraid of a challenge either! My idea of a fun pet is one that is more challenging to care for or does quirky things, like my vinegaroon will carry substrate over to put on top of a patch of moss in her tank which I find really cute haha. But my ex had a rose hair tarantula that I never even saw move, so I’m not as interested in tarantulas that are so sedentary.
 

Craig73

Arachnobaron
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Jun 2, 2016
Messages
357
I have too many to choose from, but right now my T albo and G. Iheringi are among the top ones I stare at the most. The albo because it’s fun to watch it catch its food, the iheringi for its beauty.
 

Poonjab

Arachnoprince
Active Member
Joined
Nov 4, 2019
Messages
1,356
For me, its easy....G. pulchripes and T. albopilosus.

4 big reasons i like them over all other beginner species.

1. while neither grow fast, they both grow much faster than most other beginners. This means you learn more faster and get to see them molt a little more often and...

2. Both have top notch appetites.


3. Both tend to be more active, carrying sub around, digging holes and sometimes making burrow systems...but hunger sees them out in the open a lot (like most beginner species).

4. Lastly is cost and availability. Both are important because a first shouldnt be an expensive investment...its your first try afterall.

View attachment 363590 View attachment 363591
This is the correct answer!!!
 

Craig73

Arachnobaron
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Jun 2, 2016
Messages
357
Might as well call it *Whooper. And I’m sure it has it his/her way.

edit: *whopper...cause I’m illiterate and can’t even get a punch line right.
 
Last edited:

Minty

@londontarantulas
Joined
Feb 2, 2018
Messages
498
I’m new to the hobby and was wondering what are some of the most fun and interesting/active tarantulas to keep?
Chromatopelma cyanepubescens
Theraphosa stirmi

Both eating machines. Both have their own beauty.
 

Craig73

Arachnobaron
Arachnosupporter +
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Jun 2, 2016
Messages
357
Oh, my God.
I broke my brain before I realized you meant whopper.
Ok. Last beer. I swear.
AI has failed me. Usually the phone knows my antics and catches my typos. I guess my message was sponsored by the king of beers.
 

asunshinefix

Arachnosquire
Joined
Jun 2, 2017
Messages
57
IMHO you really can't beat a Pamphobeteus. (At this point I have fully accepted my existence as a shill for Big Pampho.) Husbandry is easy and they can tolerate mistakes; they grow like weeds for New Worlds; they're gorgeous no matter the species, sex, or age; and they have a ridiculous feeding response. A couple of mine will jump to the top of the enclosure and catch the prey before it even hits the ground.

They are often skittish and they're fast as hell, but they're not mean. Maybe a little defensive on occasion but it's usually a bluff. Only one of mine throws threat poses and she usually changes her mind and runs away pretty quick. The speed is no joke though - best to feed and rehouse in a bathtub with catch cups nearby until you get used to it.

Downside is the cost, but they're so worth it. Slings are pretty affordable and they grow fast enough that you won't be waiting years to see substantial size. And they're becoming more common, so prices are coming down.

Only caveat: THE HAIRS. My girls aren't even flicky but I just poured some water into my P. sp. Machala's enclosure, and I guess it stirred up some hairs in the substrate because I now have truly spectacular hives from my fingertips to my elbows. Feels like stinging nettles, and I'm not even especially sensitized to them (it's not unusual for your reaction to get worse each time).

Don't be an idiot like me - wear long rubber gloves and eye protection and you'll be fine. And lint-roll yourself if you get haired, sounds silly but it really helps.

If after all this I have failed to sell you on Pamphos, I'd suggest looking into G. actaeon or A. geniculata. But seriously, get a Pampho.
 

coolnweird

Arachnosquire
Active Member
Joined
Oct 20, 2019
Messages
50
Here's another vote for T. albo! Mine was my first T, great feeding response, likes moving dirt around and fighting with her fake plants. I also really love my C. cyaneopubescens, it's very interesting to watch them web up! Honorable mention: my A. seemanni. Still a tiny sling, but its dug an incredibly intricate tunnel system and is always moving dirt around. Great feeding response as well.
 
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