Most Active Arboreal(s)?

Morr

Arachnopeon
Joined
Aug 17, 2002
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46
I've recently gotten more and more fascinated by arboreal Ts; with their long legs, large feet, astonishing speed and so on. They seem like a slender, faster and more... well, exact, version, of Ts :)
My only real experience with arboreals though is my own versicolor sling, and my brother's adult A. Avic, but from what I understand, the other arboreals are even more like I descriped. The only downside, as I see it, is their tendancy to, well, make a web, and then stay there, in some cases quite a lot.

So, my question is, out of all the arboreal Ts; the Avics, the Pokeys, the Taps, and all other arboreals, what genus, and preferably species, is the most active, or should I say, visible?

Thanks, for any input you might have!
 

TheDon

ArachnoDon
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Apr 19, 2003
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Hmm... well I have 2 A.avic's, 1 Versicolor Sling, 1 H.Maculata, 1 P.Irminia and a 1 P.Cambridgei. Out of all of those I see my P.Cambridgei the most just because she has been too lazy with her molt and all to build her web up yet. And I see the versicolor alot but only because she is in a vial. And my male pinktoe tours the tank alot. My baby Pinktoe used to be out alot but then made a huge web and now is in there all the time. My P.Irminia is always in her web and it doesnt take them too long to build one so when you first get them get a good look at them because you may not see them much execept through the side of the web, but they are amazing looking tarantulas. Its hard to say which is the best I know if the Togo could hide 100% then she would. When I had her tank on its side she would sit in between the lid and the log and was almost impossible to see except through the plastic lid now she sits on her log inbetween the side of the tank and the log so I can always see her sitting on her log. I dont think there is any Aboreal that is really visible all the time like some terrestrials. But this is only my opinion as I have yet to see an aboreal that didnt make some sort of web and hide in it.

peace

TheDon
 

arachnopunks

Arachnobaron
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Nov 10, 2002
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391
I agree, P. cambridgei does tend to be very visable as adults. The s'lings may hide in there web a bit, but our adults are quite large and usually remain in plain view.


-Jill
 

E-DUB

Arachnopeon
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Jun 15, 2003
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10
Ok I am bias because my first T was a Salem Ornimental. But for the best looking a Red Slate Ornimental is awsome (Poecilotheria regalis)I think. Even if you don't see them much you appreciate it more when you do. I love it when my Salem finally comes out to have a look around!
 

Venom

Arachnoprince
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Um, actually, the redslate ornamental is P. rufilata. P.regalis is the Indian ornamental.
 

Lostkat

Arachnobaron
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Feb 18, 2003
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I have an Avicularia geroldi, A. versicolor, A. purpurea, P. irminia and P. fasciata. I see my pokie far more than any of the others. She's damn fast and webs, builds, eats and moves at warp speed. Sometimes I just see her freaking out in her tank for no reason. she'll spin round webbing furiously. She's by far the most active of my T's
 

vulpina

Arachnoprince
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My P. regalis does tours at night, during the day it's in its web. My P. irminia is almost always in it's web, my A. avicularia is usually pretty visible, the most visible of my arboreals is my H. maculata, it hasn't built a web and just stays behind cork bark, but is usually out and about.

Andy
 

SpiderTwin

Arachnoangel
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Mar 17, 2003
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My P. formosa is probably the most visible of my arboreal T's. Some of my Avic's are visible, but most of the time they like to camp out in the webs.

I think it depends on the individual also, I sometimes never see some of my Avic's and others like to hang out on the glass and not in their web.

If you like a long slender arboreal T, go with a pokie.
 

Vys

Arachnoprince
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It seems as if though Stromatopelmas and Taps aren't very common?
 

Crotalus

Arachnoking
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Originally posted by Vys
It seems as if though Stromatopelmas and Taps aren't very common?
In US maybe , in Europe both genus are quite common - esp. Stromatopelma

/Lelle
 

Morr

Arachnopeon
Joined
Aug 17, 2002
Messages
46
Thank you all for your replies.

It seems to me that the level of activity of the spider varies greatly from individual to individual, but some species are generally more active than others.

The Psalmos are interesting: the irminias seem to be some of the worst web campers, while the cambridgeis seem to hang out in the open a little more.
Avics seem to be very individualistic, if that's a word, when in comes to activity, which is true in my experience as well.
I take it Taps are also quite different from spider to spider, at least that's what I think from having read different care sheets on the Internet.

Then there are the pokes... truly some of the most beautiful spiders imo, large, great colours, slender, and arboreal! Too bad they're reputed to have the worst venom of all the Ts :(
I take it though they are generally less webby / in hiding than many other arboreals, and are often out and about at night? And, I'm just curious... how difficult is it to care for a Pokey, compared to say an Avic, or a rather aggressive terrestial? I realize it varies from species to species as well as from spider to spider, but say a spider of the (generally) most calm and docile poke-species?
 

Lostkat

Arachnobaron
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Feb 18, 2003
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I've found that caring for a pokie is much the same as caring for any other nasty T. Although I've never seen the slightest hint of aggression from my pokie, I still operate a look-don't-touch policy (with one exception) and treat her with the utmost care and respect. She's extremely fast, but if you have the common sense to treat her carefully, she's absolutely fine. I happen to think that anyone can look after just about any T, it just takes a little common sense. If you don't want to get bitten, give them a little respect and don't interfere too much.

Disclaimer: Pokie's have very potent venom. You are strongly advised not to do this at home
This is Tamil, my P. fasciata, probably my favourite T in my collection. She's a stunner. These pics were taken when me and my boyfriend decided to move her to a new tank because she'd outgrown her old one. She only bolted once, when I moved a bit too fast and shocked her. She ran up my arm and onto my back. We left her for a minute or two before gently guiding her onto my boyfriend's hand. Like I said, she's shown me ZERO aggression so far, but I think it's more a case of the way I treat her, rather than her being a big wimp.



 

Vys

Arachnoprince
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Sep 22, 2002
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I have a somewhat short question, relevant somewhat.
Both Psalmopeuses and Tapinaucheniuses have to humans low-toxicity-venom, as far as anyone knows, yes?
So does anyone know anything of which species is the most in love with the insides of its own web, Psalmopeus Pulcher or Tapinauchenius Purpureus?
Thanks.
 
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