Moon Sand as substrate

Moakmeister

Arachnolord
Joined
Oct 6, 2016
Messages
631
If you've ever been to Brookstone, you've obsessively played with this stuff:

Moon Sand. A synthetic material that looks exactly like sand but behaves extremely oddly. It almost acts like a liquid. It's the most addicting thing in the world and if you haven't played with this stuff, you're missing out. Anyway, I've heard of someone using Moon Sand as substrate for his H. arizonensis scorpion and it apparently worked just fine. I was wondering if it actually is safe to use this stuff. It would be awesome if you could, because it comes in all sorts of colors, like blue, red, yellow, green, and purple.
 

DrowsyLids

Arachnosquire
Joined
Dec 4, 2016
Messages
95
If you've ever been to Brookstone, you've obsessively played with this stuff:

Moon Sand. A synthetic material that looks exactly like sand but behaves extremely oddly. It almost acts like a liquid. It's the most addicting thing in the world and if you haven't played with this stuff, you're missing out. Anyway, I've heard of someone using Moon Sand as substrate for his H. arizonensis scorpion and it apparently worked just fine. I was wondering if it actually is safe to use this stuff. It would be awesome if you could, because it comes in all sorts of colors, like blue, red, yellow, green, and purple.
I think that stuff is just corn starch and sand with some water isn't it?
 

Andrea82

Arachnoemperor
Joined
Jan 12, 2016
Messages
3,610
I think it is what we call 'magic sand'. Stuff that retains its shape until you break the surface tension and it comes gliding down like water.
I would not use this for any invert (or animal), because it doesn't retain its shape, and burrows collapse with the slightest movement. It doesn't hold water, and I think there are some pretty heavy chemical parts in it, especially the colored stuff.
Since it is soft, I don't think any invert wants to walk on this stuff.
 

Belegnole

Tarantula Guy
Old Timer
Joined
Nov 30, 2005
Messages
171
@Moakmeister There are man made colored sands. I don't have a link to any but they are made from crushed colored glass. I've used them in the past (not in tarantula keeping).
 

8legfreak

Arachnosquire
Joined
Nov 19, 2016
Messages
62
I'd LOVE a light colored/white substrate suitable for my Lp just for contrast.
 

viper69

ArachnoGod
Old Timer
Joined
Dec 8, 2006
Messages
11,508
I own this, and would NEVER use it for a T.

I was PRETTY sure it wasn't corn starch that held the grains together too, but chemicals.

@Moakmeister c'mon man, you want to drop your T into a substrate that is constantly going to shift shape, what a sadist! o_O
 

Moakmeister

Arachnolord
Joined
Oct 6, 2016
Messages
631
I own this, and would NEVER use it for a T.

I was PRETTY sure it wasn't corn starch that held the grains together too, but chemicals.

@Moakmeister c'mon man, you want to drop your T into a substrate that is constantly going to shift shape, what a sadist! o_O
It holds together better than regular sand :/
 

Moakmeister

Arachnolord
Joined
Oct 6, 2016
Messages
631
I never use sand now. But @Exoskeleton Invertebrates does, zero issues. I used to use a sand/vermiculite mix, no issues.
Right now I have Regina on some hermit crab substrate that looks the same as that stringy, chunky dust everyone else uses for dry species. It looks SO UGLY. I'm gonna start using coco fiber when I rehouse her and I get more Ts.
Hide.jpg
 

EulersK

Arachnonomicon
Staff member
Joined
Feb 22, 2013
Messages
3,290
Right now I have Regina on some hermit crab substrate that looks the same as that stringy, chunky dust everyone else uses for dry species. It looks SO UGLY. I'm gonna start using coco fiber when I rehouse her and I get more Ts.
View attachment 233152
If you want it to look nice, use topsoil! You get that natural gradient of different shapes and sizes of wood/dirt.
 
Top