Molts and Fangs Hardening

Jeff23

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I understand the colors for knowing when the fangs are hardened. And I have seen the posts saying we should wait for them to turn black before providing food. How does a tarantula in the wild follow these rules? There is no sign placed outside the burrow / hide that says "Not Ready To Eat You Yet".

My 2.5" Avicularia Versicolor FINALLY molted last week on Tuesday after refusing food for 3 months. Her abdomen size after the molt is scaring me bad. Her fangs are currently very reddish right now but not black. I am trying to tell myself to be patient to wait the full week everyone claims but am worried right now.

Does everyone wait one week?
 

Chris LXXIX

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When it comes to slings in general I wait always a good 5 days. For juve/adults always 15/20, depends.
 

Jerry

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They will usually stay hold up in burrow or web or hole in the tree webed or sealed in until they are completely hardened up but under the right conditions they could damage there fangs in the wild just like they would in the care of a hobbyist
 

Chris LXXIX

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In the wild is a complete different story, of course, since everyday is a fight for survive another day. That's why they are so well 'equipped'. Those setae that are a joke for me (I don't have any particular reaction to them) are an amazing weapon against their predators... OW's possess a potent venom as we know.

Now I don't know of course how they will 'regulate' the chelicerae question but I agree with Jerry ^
 

Jeff23

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They will usually stay hold up in burrow or web or hole in the tree webed or sealed in until they are completely hardened up but under the right conditions they could damage there fangs in the wild just like they would in the care of a hobbyist
I just wonder if there are real cases where tarantulas in the hobby have gotten their fangs damaged from eating too quick after the molt. I have done site searches on Google and can't find anything. But too many links show up for fangs being deformed/damaged during the molt process so it is hard to do a successful search.

I have noticed that my tarantula has opened her web hide so maybe she did go get water (I don't know because I have only see her in the hide). Unfortunately there is no easy way to provide cricket soup to an arboreal (especially a skittish one). I placed a little puddle of water in a section of her cocoon and she emptied it. I am wondering if cricket soup will be too thick to feed through a syringe.
 

Jerry

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Yes I have herd of Ts damaging there fangs and my vagans molted and has opened up to get water the other day but is now we're near hardened enufe to eat so it is important to make sure they fangs are hardened and not just assume that there ready to eat just because they have came out
 

Jerry

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I'm not sure it would be difficult for sure to feed a T with damaged fangs which is why everyone stresses not feeding tell they've hardened and I should clarify I've herd of Ts with damaged fangs not necessarily from feeding to early but damaged all the same not sure hope I never have to deal with that myself
 

Jeff23

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I'm not sure it would be difficult for sure to feed a T with damaged fangs which is why everyone stresses not feeding tell they've hardened and I should clarify I've herd of Ts with damaged fangs not necessarily from feeding to early but damaged all the same not sure hope I never have to deal with that myself
Thanks. I think I am going to test out some cricket soup. I have several sizes of syringes. I would suspect this would be safe for the fangs.

EDIT* My T doesn't have damaged fangs. I am just trying to expedite getting her some food.
 

mistertim

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They tend to know when they're ready to eat IME. They will usually either just run from prey if they aren't ready or will stomp and try to scare them away. My guess is that broken fangs could be the result of the tarantula feeling cornered and having no choice but to attack the prey. Not necessarily to eat, but to make sure IT doesn't get eaten. That's why whenever I feed after a molt I don't just drop it in and leave. I'll see the spider's reaction and remove the prey if they obviously aren't ready.
 

Jeff23

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They tend to know when they're ready to eat IME. They will usually either just run from prey if they aren't ready or will stomp and try to scare them away. My guess is that broken fangs could be the result of the tarantula feeling cornered and having no choice but to attack the prey. Not necessarily to eat, but to make sure IT doesn't get eaten. That's why whenever I feed after a molt I don't just drop it in and leave. I'll see the spider's reaction and remove the prey if they obviously aren't ready.
I agree with you. I am more worried about a very weak T due to the tiny abdomen. At some point it is safer to risk fangs than have a dead tarantula - choices must be made. Hopefully cricket soup is not a major risk.
 

Andrea82

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I agree with you. I am more worried about a very weak T due to the tiny abdomen. At some point it is safer to risk fangs than have a dead tarantula - choices must be made. Hopefully cricket soup is not a major risk.
It might be in need of water more than food. Shriveled/shrunken abdomen is usually a sign of dehydration, of which you already witnessed, since it emptied the little puddle. I would provide it with water like you're already doing.
I understand that you are worried, especially with the threads about a Theraphosid actually NOT knowing what is best.
If you provide it with food, make sure it is all goo, with no solid parts. Innards of waxworms or mealworms may work better. I'm curious to know if it will take it. (I am by no means encouraging you to put your T's life on the line!)
If it doesn't eat it, just keep providing easy access to water.
 

Jeff23

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It might be in need of water more than food. Shriveled/shrunken abdomen is usually a sign of dehydration, of which you already witnessed, since it emptied the little puddle. I would provide it with water like you're already doing.
I understand that you are worried, especially with the threads about a Theraphosid actually NOT knowing what is best.
If you provide it with food, make sure it is all goo, with no solid parts. Innards of waxworms or mealworms may work better. I'm curious to know if it will take it. (I am by no means encouraging you to put your T's life on the line!)
If it doesn't eat it, just keep providing easy access to water.
This T has refused to eat for multiple months. But it did drink water during that period. The abdomen was smaller than normal before molt. Maybe I'll try to wait it out a little longer. I don't have any wax worms or meal worms.
 

The Grym Reaper

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They usually know when they're ready to start eating again, hell, even my ravenous murder tank of an A. geniculata won't eat before she feels she's 100% ready to get her Murder Death Kill on.

As stated above, make sure it always has easy access to water.
 

Andrea82

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This T has refused to eat for multiple months. But it did drink water during that period. The abdomen was smaller than normal before molt. Maybe I'll try to wait it out a little longer. I don't have any wax worms or meal worms.
Avics....:shifty:

You could use crickets if you're not opposed to some guts splattering about :D
Only using the soft 'butt' part of large crickets could work as well.
 

Abyss

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A quick search netted me the same results of @Jeff23
I didnt see a single 1st hand case of a T breaking a fang due to eating too soon from a keeper introducing food too early.

Now i go on record as saying i DONT use a "1-week" or "15-day" or whatever timeline after a moult as every T of every species of dif sizes are gonna all harden up at dif intervals.
But what i do is wait for black fangs however long it takes. Once i see solid black fangs i wait a few days then feed and I have never had issue this far.

To jeffs point, i am also curious if theres ANY 1st hand accounts of this happening (not "yea i heard so an so had it happen")
 

Jeff23

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A quick search netted me the same results of @Jeff23
I didnt see a single 1st hand case of a T breaking a fang due to eating too soon from a keeper introducing food too early.

Now i go on record as saying i DONT use a "1-week" or "15-day" or whatever timeline after a moult as every T of every species of dif sizes are gonna all harden up at dif intervals.
But what i do is wait for black fangs however long it takes. Once i see solid black fangs i wait a few days then feed and I have never had issue this far.

To jeffs point, i am also curious if theres ANY 1st hand accounts of this happening (not "yea i heard so an so had it happen")
Thanks.

I looked at the fangs more closely once opportunity permitted and the fangs look like they are a partial reddish black. Earlier I was mistaking all that area around the fangs because of the webbing blurring things. I think I am going to continue to monitor things and wait another day or two. I feel a little more confident now. She seemed to be doing lots of body grooming after I gave her more water drops in the nest area so I am hoping she will be ready tomorrow or the next day.
 

The Grym Reaper

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Now i go on record as saying i DONT use a "1-week" or "15-day" or whatever timeline after a moult as every T of every species of dif sizes are gonna all harden up at dif intervals.
But what i do is wait for black fangs however long it takes. Once i see solid black fangs i wait a few days then feed and I have never had issue this far.
I wait for solid black fangs and then try to feed a freshly moulted prey item, if they don't take it straight away then I remove it, wait a few days and try again. They almost always eat though.
 

Crone Returns

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Thanks. I think I am going to test out some cricket soup. I have several sizes of syringes. I would suspect this would be safe for the fangs.

EDIT* My T doesn't have damaged fangs. I am just trying to expedite getting her some food.
I understand your anxiety, esp. with the shriveled abdomen, but I'd leave her alone until her fangs are black. She may refuse the cric soup anyway even though she needs the nutrition. Don't force her. And remember that her whole body is still getting to the end hardening.
 
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