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Mold on my indoor pepper plant's roots

Discussion in 'Live Plants' started by Pepper, Dec 3, 2019.

  1. Pepper

    Pepper Arachnosquire Active Member

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    You can read the headline, so ill cut to the chase. Repotting is not really an option because of the way the plant has spread out and intertwined with other plants in my small plant room (closet). Is there anything i could put on it? (Already tried springtails) I read some things about baking soda or apple cider vinegar, but it seems like those solutions would need some balancing? Anyone have experience with this?
     
  2. Poonjab

    Poonjab Arachnopeon Active Member

    Is it a white fuzzy mold? If so, then it could be saprophyte. It’s a mold that only eats dead tissue. I use to have this problem when I first started keeping carnivorous plants. My plants were dying and I wasn’t aware at the time until it was basically too late. Might be why it’s only affecting the pepper plant and not the others.
     
  3. Pepper

    Pepper Arachnosquire Active Member

    Yes it is white and fuzzy! Any fix?
     
  4. Pepper

    Pepper Arachnosquire Active Member

    Ok, i see baking soda mixed with water, and cinnamon, will kill it. Will this cause any damage to the soil's balance, and how do i offset it?
     
  5. Poonjab

    Poonjab Arachnopeon Active Member

    Those components shouldn’t. The best thing to do is clear away any dead or decaying matter. scrape away any mold on the soil or plants and discard it. Careful not to over water in the future. This combined with poor air circulation will cause mold to grow. Start with a light sprinkle of baking soda and cinnamon. Don’t go overboard. If this along with the few changes doesn’t work, you can always try neem oil. That’s what I used to use on my carnivorous plants and it did the trick.
     
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  6. The Snark

    The Snark هرج و مرج مهندس Old Timer

    This is a no brainer. Just use a zinc bearing fertilizer. It's very common and certain death to molds and fungi.
     
  7. Pepper

    Pepper Arachnosquire Active Member

    Thanks for the tip! If the above solution doesnt work ill look more into this.
     
  8. Poonjab

    Poonjab Arachnopeon Active Member

    That’s good to know. I had no idea of that. I know as far as carnivorous plants go, you’re pretty limited on what you can put on the soil. I’m going to look into this. Thanks
     
  9. The Snark

    The Snark هرج و مرج مهندس Old Timer

    Re: Zinc. It only takes a micro amount of zinc to stop spores from growing. As example, simply stringing a galvanized wire along either side of the hip of a roof will inhibit and eliminate algae growth on roofing just from rain picking up minute amounts of zinc oxides off the wire and depositing them down stream.

    You can even make a mild zinc spray solution spore killer by boiling galvanized wire in pure vinegar or stronger solutions of acetic acid. Care must be taken however as the threshold from beneficial nutrient for animals to toxic is very low. Also, it is pervasive and will accumulate in the environment.
    Zinc solutions and compounds are commonly used as wood preservatives.
     
    Last edited: Dec 5, 2019
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