Mites on Brachypelma boehmei

AgnO

Arachnopeon
Joined
Aug 16, 2016
Messages
10
Hi all
My small B boehmei is going to molt soon. I took a look at her with a magnifier and noticed a small, transparent like creature crawling on her abdomen. Next day I checked again and on closer inspection I noticed there were more than 1 on her abdomen and also noticed one on her legs. I use coconut fiber as a substrate and I don't keep it very wet (wet enough that it keeps a dark color but if you squeeze it, it's nothing near to dripping any water). I also always clean the food leftovers a few hours after she throws them. Perhaps I haven't provided good ventilation and need to open more holes into the lid. My question is:
1. Shall I transfer her to a new container (with a hide and paper towel on the bottom just until she molts) and after that put her in a new clean home.
OR
2. Shall I leave it there in her actual house and transfer her after she molts.

I'll remove the shed as soon as I can but I'm afraid how soon the mites may be transferred into her again.

Here's the link of a previous post I made showing her enclosure: http://arachnoboards.com/threads/b-boehmei-sling-enclosure.286329/
 

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TownesVanZandt

Arachnoprince
Joined
May 12, 2015
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1,046
You shouldn´t disturb a tarantula that is about to moult. From your picture it doesn´t look like you have a heavy infestation of mites and most mites are harmless in small quantities. I would let it moult, wait for it to fully recover from that and then move it into a new enclosure.
 

AgnO

Arachnopeon
Joined
Aug 16, 2016
Messages
10
Okay, thnx. Not sure if mites have a day - night cycle but there seems to be more on her at night.
 

KezyGLA

Arachnoking
Joined
Apr 8, 2016
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3,033
Hey,

Thats a nice little boehmei you got there.

I would wait until it molts.

Once it has hardened I would make an enclosure with more ventilation, some holes on the sides too for cross ventilation.

B boehmei do well on dry substrate with access to a water dish(overflowed a little). So try make sure the sub is dry before transferring it.
 

AgnO

Arachnopeon
Joined
Aug 16, 2016
Messages
10
Thanks! She is indeed very nice and also calm in temperament.
 

AgnO

Arachnopeon
Joined
Aug 16, 2016
Messages
10
I rehoused her today. Here's a picture of the new setup:


Took that piece of bark at the park few days ago. Thought it would suit and be good for my sling's enclosure. I boiled it for around half an hour than left it to dry in the sun, then kept it in the freezer overnight and left it to dry again, hoping that if there were any living organisms in or on it, that would fix the problem.
Shall I keep the substrate dry with no misting at all? Will the water bowl be enough for B. boehmeis?
 

KezyGLA

Arachnoking
Joined
Apr 8, 2016
Messages
3,033
Thats better. Make sure the wood is completely dry or it will gather mould quickly. Keep the substrate dry and ocasionally overfill the waterdish a little then let it dry out.
 

cold blood

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Jan 19, 2014
Messages
12,033
I rehoused her today. Here's a picture of the new setup:



Took that piece of bark at the park few days ago. Thought it would suit and be good for my sling's enclosure. I boiled it for around half an hour than left it to dry in the sun, then kept it in the freezer overnight and left it to dry again, hoping that if there were any living organisms in or on it, that would fix the problem.
Shall I keep the substrate dry with no misting at all? Will the water bowl be enough for B. boehmeis?
Looks good...but a park isn't always a good place for wood collection, theyre usually maintained by the city/town and because theyre there for people, often kids, there's usually pesticides around. On top of that it almost looks like a large piece of mulch type bark (which looks great btw), if that's the case, it would just reinforce the likelihood of pesticides in the area...landscapers love to spray things. Now if this is a totally wild park in the woods, its a different story.

As for the sterilization, that's not necessary, although baking is, but the reason is to dry the wood out completely.

Thats better. Make sure the wood is completely dry or it will gather mould quickly.
As he said, any moisture will invite mold, you have to be very careful when harvesting wild wood. Not that its a bad idea, I do it myself, but you really have to know what pieces to just ignore and which ones to use. Anything too new or fresh is off the table, no matter how good it looks, its just too hard to remove all the moisture from within.

I've found driftwood (ironically, because it was once submerged) to be the most reliable in terms of not growing mold. Old rotted wood can also be good, but it must be dry...but its more porous, so it can be dried in an oven much easier.
 
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