MIllipede dying or moulting??

Grizzlybear

Arachnopeon
Joined
Nov 17, 2020
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4
Hi!! First time keeper, I found this Siamese pointy-tailed millipede in a park (I live in South east asia) and have kept him for about a month. He's got organic compost and sphagnum moss and i feed him small pieces of fruit regularly, which he seems to enjoy eating. I also mist his enclosure regularly. Lately he's been a bit sluggish and I noticed a light brown patch on him when I first caught him (which I assumed was just a deformity from a previous moult). He doesn't seem to burrow much although the soil is definitely loose enough.

Today I checked on him and he's curled loosely under some leaves, his legs look whiter than usual and shell looks a bit dried, and he's developed more of those light brown patches near his tail!! I also didn't notice him moving last night at the time he usually does (although idk if he moved while I was asleep) and his food seems untouched. Usually he reacts a bit when I mist and the water touches him but today he didn't either. Is he dying?? Is he moulting?? Is he infected or sth?? There's no smell coming from him, and he's moving very slightly. Pls help, not sure if I should be concerned, and there's not much info around about SEA species of millipedes :(


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LizardStudent

Arachnosquire
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Aug 16, 2020
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75
I'm thinking the outlook is not too good. One of my previous millipedes developed brown spots when I was keeping her too moist, but I have also just seen spots like that on sickly millipedes. I would leave her alone and not spray regardless, if there's any chance on him making it then it relies on being undisturbed
 

Grizzlybear

Arachnopeon
Joined
Nov 17, 2020
Messages
4
Update:
He is now covered all over in the light brown/white patches, and still has not moved at all after about 48 hours. It looks to me like a fungal infection of some kind(although if anyone knows more about this I would really appreciate the input), and he is probably dead already. Rip.
 

Polenth

Arachnobaron
Active Member
Joined
Sep 29, 2018
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414
A sudden fungi increase would suggest he's dead and that's why it grew so quickly. Given this was a wild caught adult from the looks of it, he could just have been old.
 

LizardStudent

Arachnosquire
Active Member
Joined
Aug 16, 2020
Messages
75
Some people tend to shy away from wild caught pet invertebrates largely due to the concern that they will harbor pests or diseases that could either cause them to die prematurely or even pass the pathogens onto other pets being kept. Sorry for the loss :-( hopefully you will get to try again with pedes and not be deterred from keeping them, they're some of my favorite animals
 

Grizzlybear

Arachnopeon
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Nov 17, 2020
Messages
4
Yes indeed! Unfortunately where I'm from, the sale and trade of insects and other invertebrates is not legal yet, so I can only keep the ones I catch, and I try to provide a habitat as close to the one I found them in. I also do taxidermy to preserve and research dead specimens, so I can learn more about them. Thanks for all the help, I do take all my pet deaths as learning experiences too. Hopefully next time will be better :)
 

Polenth

Arachnobaron
Active Member
Joined
Sep 29, 2018
Messages
414
Yes indeed! Unfortunately where I'm from, the sale and trade of insects and other invertebrates is not legal yet, so I can only keep the ones I catch, and I try to provide a habitat as close to the one I found them in. I also do taxidermy to preserve and research dead specimens, so I can learn more about them. Thanks for all the help, I do take all my pet deaths as learning experiences too. Hopefully next time will be better :)
One thing to try would be finding younger millipedes. They'll be less obvious, but I've found piles of them in damp rotting wood and such. It's often hard to tell species at that point, but you might be able to get enough to start a colony of whatever they turn out to be.
 
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