Microclimate for Poecilotheria slings?

mistertim

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So I'm getting my first Pokie tomorrow. Its a 1" P. regalis sling. Setting up its enclosure now (32 oz deli) and was wondering if they are best off without ventilation on the lid (just cross ventilation) so that a microclimate can form, as is the case with Avics. What do you all generally do for them?
 

Venom1080

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i do both vent holes on the lid and on the sides, cant hurt. as far as i know, micro climates form fairly easily as long as theres not a screen lid. they dont need as much vent as avics.
 

Ceymann

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Agree with venom, mine did fine in a vial with three air holes in the pop cap and thats it until I transferred it into a AMAC box.
 

Poec54

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I've raised many dozens of Poec slings in 32 oz deli cups (which is what I start them in, not 16 oz). I put a couple rows of holes in the upper sides, never any in the lid.

Inside is an inch of slightly moist substrate, a piece of cork leaning against the side, some long fiber sphagnum moss under the cork for nesting (and kept slightly moist for humidity), and a small disposable plastic water bowl. They thrive like that.

As they grow I take out the sphagnum; they don't need it anymore, and it gets moved around and can wick water out of the water bowl.

BTW, I never put holes in deli cup lids, for any species of tarantula, arboreal or terrestrial.
 

Sana

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I keep my pokie slings basically the same as my avics as far as ventilation goes. The only difference is that I keep the substrate a bit more moist for a pokie.
 

Venom1080

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I've raised many dozens of Poec slings in 32 oz deli cups (which is what I start them in, not 16 oz). I put a couple rows of holes in the upper sides, never any in the lid.

Inside is an inch of slightly moist substrate, a piece of cork leaning against the side, some long fiber sphagnum moss under the cork for nesting (and kept slightly moist for humidity), and a small disposable plastic water bowl. They thrive like that.

As they grow I take out the sphagnum; they don't need it anymore, and it gets moved around and can wick water out of the water bowl.

BTW, I never put holes in deli cup lids, for any species of tarantula, arboreal or terrestrial.
is there a particular reason for that? or just personal preference?
 

WeightedAbyss75

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holes on the sides only and not the lid.
You do that for cross ventilation. If there are holes in the top, all of the humidity in the enclosure goes right through the top and doesn't keep humidity as well. If they're on the side, the water stays in there longer. The less you bother the spider, the better. Especially if it's a pokie :D
 

Moonohol

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You do that for cross ventilation. If there are holes in the top, all of the humidity in the enclosure goes right through the top and doesn't keep humidity as well. If they're on the side, the water stays in there longer. The less you bother the spider, the better. Especially if it's a pokie :D
I've read in various places that it's important to place your cross ventilation on the top and middle of the enclosure, but I've also read that you should make sure there's a lot of cross-ventilation right above the substrate towards the bottom. Would you say any of that's correct, or is it irrelevant?
 

Venom1080

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You do that for cross ventilation. If there are holes in the top, all of the humidity in the enclosure goes right through the top and doesn't keep humidity as well. If they're on the side, the water stays in there longer. The less you bother the spider, the better. Especially if it's a pokie :D
i knew that already but i was wondering why Poec only put holes in the sides. i guess that is the only reason though..
 

cold blood

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I've read in various places that it's important to place your cross ventilation on the top and middle of the enclosure, but I've also read that you should make sure there's a lot of cross-ventilation right above the substrate towards the bottom. Would you say any of that's correct, or is it irrelevant?
Ventilation on the top isn't cross ventilation...moisture floats right out the top, which can dry things out surprisingly fast.

I do ventilate the lids, but only a couple small holes for watering with a syringe....plus most of mine are stacked
 

Moonohol

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Ventilation on the top isn't cross ventilation...moisture floats right out the top, which can dry things out surprisingly fast.

I do ventilate the lids, but only a couple small holes for watering with a syringe....plus most of mine are stacked
I was mainly wondering if it matters where the cross-ventilation is placed; high or low on the sides. It seems to me that placing cross-ventilation near the substrate would help to prevent mold growth from stagnant air, but that's 100% speculation.

EDIT: I see how the phrasing in my original post was confusing, when I said "top" of the enclosure, I meant high up on the sides. My apologies!
 
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Poec54

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I've read in various places that it's important to place your cross ventilation on the top and middle of the enclosure, but I've also read that you should make sure there's a lot of cross-ventilation right above the substrate towards the bottom. Would you say any of that's correct, or is it irrelevant?

I've never used holes near the substrate, it's really not needed. With slings, it can be easy for their prey to escape thru them. Holes up high allow for air exchange, and also help with the microclimate (as opposed to holes near the substrate, down where the spider is). You don't need a wind tunnel.
 

Moonohol

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I've never used holes near the substrate, it's really not needed. With slings, it can be easy for their prey to escape thru them. Holes up high allow for air exchange, and also help with the microclimate (as opposed to holes near the substrate, down where the spider is). You don't need a wind tunnel.
Very good point about their prey being able to escape, I hadn't even considered that.
 

Trenor

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I've never used holes near the substrate, it's really not needed. With slings, it can be easy for their prey to escape thru them.
How big do you make those holes? I mainly use a push pin for the sling enclosures when they are really tiny. I make them a bit bigger when they are 3/4" and up.
 

Poec54

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How big do you make those holes? I mainly use a push pin for the sling enclosures when they are really tiny. I make them a bit bigger when they are 3/4" and up.

Push pin? Only for 1/8" or 1/4" slings. That's not enough airflow for bigger slings. I use a soldering iron (pointed tip, not a soldering gun). I either make small round holes or slash marks. I periodically file the tip, so i's sharp and can make small holes. For deli cups with large slings/small juveniles, I'll poke the soldering iron all the way thru. I use a ceiling fan when doing this, and never in the spider room.
 

WeightedAbyss75

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How big do you make those holes? I mainly use a push pin for the sling enclosures when they are really tiny. I make them a bit bigger when they are 3/4" and up.
Depends on materials. I have recantly started using a soldering iron, but for slings a heated pin works too. General rule is if the spider's carapace can fit through it, it's too big. Not sure about prey, but as long as you put it high at use no fliers, there should be no issues. I feed my T's big-ish prey, so I've never had the problem :)
 
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