MIA G. aureostriata

helpermonkey

Arachnopeon
Joined
Nov 18, 2006
Messages
5
So 4 days after purschasing my little juvi aureostriata, she decided to bulldoze her enclousre and bury herself completely. I haven't seen her in going on three months now. I've asked some advice on other boards here and there and always kind of get a "oh yeah, they do that" with no more details. Although she's apparently not very hungry or thirsty, I know she's alive and well as I can (gently) lift her cage and see her from the bottom.

Does anybody have an idea of what I might be able to do to coax her out of her self-induced seclusion? Or do I just need to leave her be? And if so, what does that mean? How long will she be in there?

I have more overall experience with keeping scorpions and in the past when I've found one determined to be strictly nocturnal, I usually provide a sort of half hide that kinda forces it to be more active during the day. Would this be too stressful for a T? In other words, do I *need* to leave her be?
 

thwarts

Arachnopeon
Joined
Dec 25, 2006
Messages
25
IMO you shouldn't dig a T out of its burrow as this is stressful for it. I wouldn't worry too much, if it wants food or water it'll come out.
 

cheetah13mo

Arachnoking
Old Timer
Joined
Oct 10, 2006
Messages
2,153
Thwarts is right. You don't want to disturb the T just to satisfy your own suspisions. I have around 10 splings of different species and they all bull doze and bury themselves in a tomb of peat. Spray the side of the enclosure once a week and when its ready, it'll dig itself out. There are a few of mine that I have never seen on top of the peat yet. I know they come up because the little crickets disappear but bofore morning comes, they dig down to the bottom to stay for another extended amount of time. Just go with the flow and keep an eye on it. it'll be fine as long as it gets a little moisture every now and then.;)
 

Windchaser

Arachnoking
Old Timer
Joined
Dec 13, 2004
Messages
2,997
I agree with the previous posts. Just leave it alone. When it is ready it will come out. I have a H. lividum that I have not seen outside of its burrow in over two years.
 

helpermonkey

Arachnopeon
Joined
Nov 18, 2006
Messages
5
well yes, I understand that you can have a digging species that you never or rarely see outside of it's burrow but this isn't a burrow. It's a complete bury. There's no opening. It ain't there. She doesn't sneak out at night. She has not unburied herself for any reason whatsoever in over two months. Crickets play happily for days until I get them out and water is never drank or disturbed. This is kinda what I keep running into - a lot of people are assuming she's in a burrow and comes out at night to drink or eat crickets on occasion. But this is NOT what this is. She's totally and completely blocked herself off to the world.

How can I get her moisture without diggining her out? I know everybody says she'll come out if she needs something but is that an absolute truth? Nobody's ever has a T that maybe got a little confused and needed a helping hand?
 

Windchaser

Arachnoking
Old Timer
Joined
Dec 13, 2004
Messages
2,997
well yes, I understand that you can have a digging species that you never or rarely see outside of it's burrow but this isn't a burrow. It's a complete bury. There's no opening. It ain't there. She doesn't sneak out at night. She has not unburied herself for any reason whatsoever in over two months. Crickets play happily for days until I get them out and water is never drank or disturbed. This is kinda what I keep running into - a lot of people are assuming she's in a burrow and comes out at night to drink or eat crickets on occasion. But this is NOT what this is. She's totally and completely blocked herself off to the world.

How can I get her moisture without diggining her out? I know everybody says she'll come out if she needs something but is that an absolute truth? Nobody's ever has a T that maybe got a little confused and needed a helping hand?
To provide moisture simply pour some water into the substrate. Many of my tarantulas seal themselves in and this includes G. aureostriata. Some for long periods. When any of mine completely seal themselves in I will stop feeding until the burrow opens up again. I will pour water into the substrate though to provide water. Beyond that it is a waiting game. They know what they are doing.
 

Varden

Arachnodemon
Old Timer
Joined
May 22, 2005
Messages
704
Just dampen the substrate and let her go. She knows the water is there, she can probably 'smell' it. And don't worry, G. aureostriata may dig when their small, but they do grow out of it. I've got a couple dozen and all are now above ground. They make beautiful display Ts once they're grown.
 

cacoseraph

ArachnoGod
Old Timer
Joined
Jan 5, 2005
Messages
8,328
heh

as long as the spider isn't actively molting and you aren't a complete idiot you can dig it up and see what is going on. i do this when i have doubts about the status of a spider.

now, a lot of people have mentioned stress. i don't doubt that the spider is distressed a little bit, as much as a nonsentient, unconscious can be distressed... but the real question is will this distress negatively affect the spider's ability to molt and eventually reproduce? not by a long shot.

unfortunately most tarantulas are secretive creatures, more so when small. you can dig them up or whatever from time to time to make sure they are still doing ok.
 
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