Mexican Red Kneed

Slaxik

Arachnopeon
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Mar 28, 2003
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6
Well guys!!!

I decided to try Mexican Red Kneed! Is that spider good for people
who just start with tarantulas????

Tell me everything-and I would like to know people who has got that one spider!!!!!!

Thank you!!!
 

jwb121377

Arachnoangel
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Aug 20, 2002
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Well I've got a B smithi and find them to be very cute. They like to flick hair, but are not usally agressive. I keep mine in a small kritter kepper with 1" of peat moss for the subsrate. Ofcorse you will need a water dish and some cork bark for the T to hide under won't hurt. Other than that I can't think of much else, anything else you wanted to know?
 

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Joy

Priestess of Pulchra-tude
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I have thirteen of them. They are beautiful spiders and very easy to take care of. Mature specimens do fine on dry substrate with only a water dish for humidity; small immature specimens will require a damp substrate. You can give them a hide, but most of mine are quite happy just sitting out in the open. Temperamentally most are extremely docile, so much so that they are sometimes derisively called pet rocks. One does encounter the occasional skittish specimen, but this usually takes the form of urtication rather than biting.

They aren't especially active, as mentioned before, and I have succcessfully kept all but the largest mature specimens in shoe boxes, though they're such pretty spiders that I prefer to keep them in larger display-type vivaria. 5 gallon aquariums are a good size for mature specimens, though you will need to raise the substrate level fairly high to avoid any possibility of an injurious fall. As with most terrestrial species, the distance from the top of the substrate to the lid of the vivarium should be no more than the spider's outstretched legspan.

They aren't particularly big eaters IME, although this is another thing that varies a good deal from specimen to specimen. Most of my mature specimens eat once a month or less. I have some that are too lazy to catch crickets; the food has to be more or less stationary before they will bother to eat it. Most readily take pinkie mice, superworms (Zophobos morio), beef heart, and other alternative tarantula foods. They have the reputation of being a very long-lived species. 20-30 years is considered quite achievable for female specimens with good care.

Joy
 
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Nixy

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Smithis are great.
Ours stays Right out in the open looking Lovely.
I can't add much more then what Joy already said.
They are a great all around T. Big bold looking and easy to please.
If you handle your T just remember to make sure your low, I mean LOW, like on the floor with your hands down in case of a fall.
Look at the picture Joy put up.
That's the most distence your T should be from any surface.
Just in case because they are great pet rocks and slow for the T world but can haul a little bracy butt when startled and are a big on the heavey side when you hold them.
So practice safety for th sake of your T and yourself against those hairs. Ours does some wild hair kicking when startled and those things can play hell in an eye or up a nose.
Good rule of thumb when working in the tank is to wash your hands afterwards and not rub your face or eyes till you do.
Better to do it and not need it then need it and not do it.
 

Slaxik

Arachnopeon
Joined
Mar 28, 2003
Messages
6
Thank you

Can I just ask?
It means I can smithi handle without a worry?
By the way thanks for the good news!
Slaxik
 

Godzilla2000

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I still prefer the Pink Zebra Beauty. (Of course I do not own a Smithi.....yet.)
 

Nixy

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In my opinion there is no such thing as handling anything without worry.
Your dealing with a living creature that could up and do anything it wants ina twinkling of an eye.
Respect is your goal.
Just because your bigger, smarter and faster doesn't mean nothing can happen.
Theres no such thing as so much experience that accidents can't happen and mistakes can't be made.
Enjoy your new pet in the best ways YOUR comfortable with and research research research. You just Can't learn too much.
 

Code Monkey

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Re: Thank you

Originally posted by Slaxik
Can I just ask? It means I can smithi handle without a worry?
Probably :)
While the vast majority of B. smithi are docile petrocks, or hair flickers at the worst, there are always exceptions. But, if you pay attention to your spider you'll easily be able to tell the difference.
 

That Guy

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Jan 29, 2003
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I thought they were desert living T's? If they are, I would think you need sand... Or am I wrong?
 

Maggie

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I dont use sand because of it maybe blocking up the book lungs? Just my opinion, havent been at this as long as others.
 

The_Phantom

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I used sand w/my Rosie for a while, she did fine. Shes in peat moss now, no wait, shes in,.....potting soil. My smithi is in peat, as is my A.Avic.

As for smithis, (Mexican Red Knee) I think it is one of the most beautiful Ts around ! I love mine, and it is one that I have wanted since I started in the hobby 6 years ago. I finally got mine last summer and love her alot. Shes a big un already, and Im pretty sure shes a she. I cant wait to see her molt into a bigger beast, and live with me until Im like, 50. I got her on sale from the neighborhood rip off pet shop, for 119 $ I dont handle her at all, she is a little skittish. When she gets scared she tends to bolt. Id like to some day, but just not now.
 

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jwb121377

Arachnoangel
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I never use sand for the same reason as Maggie, I would not want it to get in the book lungs. I'm not sure if there is any validity to the theory, but better to be safe than sorry imo.
 

Slaxik

Arachnopeon
Joined
Mar 28, 2003
Messages
6
Thank you

Thanks for all your comments!!!! I am just on the start, and maybe I have sometimes very stupid questions-thanks to all of you, that you didn't let me know that!!!

Your experiences are like a threasure for me!!!!

=D
 

caligulathegod

Arachnodeity
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Dec 26, 2002
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No, actually stupid is NOT asking questions. If you are unsure about something people here are glad to assist you. Folks here like to see people curious about the best ways to take care of these wonderful critters. :)


I just got one myself and I love it. It has to be one of the most beautiful spiders around.
 

Joy

Priestess of Pulchra-tude
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Originally posted by Maggie
I dont use sand because of it maybe blocking up the book lungs? Just my opinion, havent been at this as long as others.
I understand there are some very knowledgeable people who do use sand-based substrates for some of the desert species, but I prefer to avoid the use of sand myself, both because of possible blockage to the booklungs and because of its abrasive properties.

Joy
 

Code Monkey

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Back in the 80s and mid 90s I did use sand with B. smithi and never had a problem (and had no idea you might even be supposed to use something else). However, like Joy points out, the abrasive properties of it are not the best and I no longer use it for any T.

Although "desert" animals, that still doesn't that what they live in isn't anything more 'deserty' than dirt.
 
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