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Loxosceles arizonica - an overview with pics

NYAN

Arachnoking
Active Member
Joined
Dec 23, 2017
Messages
2,422
Since there is very little information on the different Loxosceles species, and my last write up about them was appreciated, I figured I would do another.

The species that will be discussed today is Loxosceles arizonica. This species has been described as being one which is found at both higher elevations in Arizona, as well as being restricted to areas where saguaro cacti are present (Gertsch & Ennik, 1983). This species shares ranges with Loxosceles apachea, sabina, and deserta also. Identifying these as arizonica was done by utilizing range maps and appearance descriptions, which state that sabina and deserta generally lack pattern on the carapace.

I observed this species in a variety of habitats. I observed them in very moist, riparian habitat as well as drier, rocky habitat. This species was found in similar habitat that I have found other Loxosceles in. They are found most commonly within and underneath wood and cactus parts. They often were found in areas that termites occupy, as well as under the same objects as other spider species. Compared to Loxosceles deserta which seems to exhibit more synanthropic characteristics, this species tends to be found away from human habitation.

Examples of microhabitat

2DCDB4CE-91B3-4963-8E75-A4EFB3A66E94.jpeg

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Additionally, compared to my observations of Loxosceles deserta, I found only what appear to be adult females. I found no evidence of egg sacs either. I believe that females of this genus are more long lasting than other true spiders and may survive several seasons to breed.

Photos of specimens

ED1FFE8F-8171-4C9C-889D-81F829DA4261.jpeg

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AC4552B5-AE1E-475A-80B4-72FED10473A3.jpeg
 

pannaking22

Arachnoemperor
Active Member
Joined
Nov 25, 2011
Messages
4,081
Same sort of habitat here is used by L. devia. They really seem to love the crap people dump out in the brush, but they don't like to live that close to humans. A weird sort of give-take relationship.
 

NYAN

Arachnoking
Active Member
Joined
Dec 23, 2017
Messages
2,422
Same sort of habitat here is used by L. devia. They really seem to love the crap people dump out in the brush, but they don't like to live that close to humans. A weird sort of give-take relationship.
I think that a lot of animals take advantage of the shelter that people’s trashiness provides. Anyway, you should make a little documentation of the species if you get the chance.
 

Arthroverts

Arachnoprince
Active Member
Joined
Jul 11, 2016
Messages
1,715
Excellent write-up @NYAN. Thank you for continuing to share your knowledge and experience with us.

I find the most invertebrates under trash where I live. Fallen Joshua Tree branches? Nah. Old mattresses and bricks? You betcha.

Thanks for sharing,

Arthroverts
 
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