Loving my Acanthoscurria geniculata

TGod

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Definitely glad I bought this species its an absolute beaut to look at and has a big appetite! Mine has got an entertaining way of sitting on its coconut on display then ever so stealthily crawling back inside the coconut when spooked only to be cautiously sticking its legs out again like half an hour later. Anyone else have this species?
 
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LucN

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I do not currently own this species, but a former friend of mine was raising one. It was a sight to behold. I would say they are likely the best looking of the larger South American tarantulas. I definitely plan on getting one in a display enclosure at some point down the road.
 

DomGom TheFather

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I have one. It's young but on its way. Gorgeous and a good eater. Can't ask for much more from a spider.
 

Storm76

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That particular species is just awesome, I fully agree! Beautiful, big, quite active in comparison to most other NW terrestrials and yes - big appetite. In fact, so big that anything moving is considered food. Still sad my big girl isn't with me anymore, but boy did I love to watch that animal do its thing! Bulldozing around, ripping out plants and always tossing them into her waterdish, then flip the waterdish over and sit ontop just to taunt me. "You want to clean this up? Try if you dare..." - it was just hilarious. Except that her size wasn't. At almost 8" my 'Medeia' was a fully grown AF and they grow fast! Bottom line you can't go wrong with that species - no matter if you love your calmer NWs, or if you prefer OWs - A. geniculata should be kept by every serious hobbyist at least once in my opinion.

RIP, big girl
 

Smotzer

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Yeah they are a great species, what’s not to love about a fast growing, huge appetite, little bulldozing machines!


You want to clean this up? Try if you dare..."
so big that anything moving is considered food.
My old one was like this and currently this is like my Psalmopoeus cambridgei, I can’t do any maintenance, like cleaning out water dish or get boli without it leaping out at whatever I touch in its enclosure.
 

CommanderBacon

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I got my first one a few years ago. He was already a subadult, but I absolutely adored him, and he quickly became one of my favorite spiders.

Sadly, he molted out mature, and I sent him off on a romantic getaway with a nice lady. Now I’m caring for five of his babies, and they’re all food demons, just like him ♥
47BBC0A4-A942-4EE9-8B51-70F2008B872C.jpeg
 

Matt Man

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yup. Mine (actually my wife's) is about 2/3rds to 3/4s mature. Can't wait for the next molt
 

Baby T

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I got one!! It's currently in heavy premolt... Can't wait to see the size difference when it finally happens!!
 

Envoirment

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I lost my adult female not too long ago. A couple days ago I got a sling as this is the one tarantula my collection can't be without! It is such a tiny sling though (less than 1cm!), but like a true A. geniculata her feeding response is really good. I dropped in some pre-killed/chopped up meal worm and she made a strike at it when I dropped it by her little hide. She happily sat on it and ate the whole thing. :happy:
 

bobbibink

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I got a teenie-tiny sling about three months ago and wow they are fast growers! My little one is sporting red setae and white bands on legs already. S/he likes to hang out on top of corkbark hide and dangle front legs over. So freakin cute. Voracious appetite too!
 

Sterls

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Mine just molted and looks like a leggy little beast. Eats like a monster right up until molt too.

20210226_151251(1).jpg
 

Storm76

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I'd rehouse that one once she has hardened sufficiently then. Cage seems to become a bit small for her, mh? :)
 

Sterls

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I'd rehouse that one once she has hardened sufficiently then. Cage seems to become a bit small for her, mh? :)
Mine? Probably, hard to tell with how she is right now, and that picture didn't really show her cage size well. It was fine until this molt, lol.

20210226_163348.jpg
 

Storm76

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Why...is that T in an arboreal enclosure? I'd use that for raising Avics or something, or a Psalmopeous sp. instead and put her into a smaller sized shoebox-type enclosure.

Rule of thumb for terrestrials = 3x legspan in width, max 2x in height.

To me that looks like you tossed Pikachu into the batcave - no offense :p
 

Uial

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IMG_20210224_161918.jpg Here is mine. I've heard and read here that some people's are bulldozers, but mine is very chill. Leaves all her decorations alone, only walks through her water dish occasionally^^ She's 17 cm dls when she's all stretched out and in a 60x40x30 cm enclosure
 

Envoirment

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Mine? Probably, hard to tell with how she is right now, and that picture didn't really show her cage size well. It was fine until this molt, lol.
That's the one thing I like about the species too. They can gain a large amount of size in just one moult. Mine went from 4" to ~5.5" in one moult. I think housing them in an enclosure that looks a bit too big or their final enclosure is a good idea once they reach 3-4" if you want to avoid rehousing.
 
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