Looking for T recommendations

Moakmeister

Arachnolord
Joined
Oct 6, 2016
Messages
632
I'm gonna be controversial here - doesn't that describe our entire hobby? It doesn't do anything for the animals (except maybe preservation of some species) and is solely for our own interest and entertainment. The tarantulas are much better off in the wild and there seems to be some high horses around these boards. My B. auratum is super chill (for now) and seems to prefer to sit still on my arm (me on the floor) using her tarsal claws to pull herself as close to my skin as possible to gain body heat. If I gently nudge her she clamps down harder as to say "I aint' moving mate, get used to it" and can sit like that for a long time (maybe I should turn up the thermostat...).
I respectfully disagree. Tarantulas are most definitely better off in captivity, free from predation, parasites, harsh weather, and with a constant supply of healthy food and fresh water. Very few tarantulas survive until adulthood, which is why they give birth to hundreds of spiderlings. They are terribly lucky to be born in captivity.
 
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Venom1080

Arachnoemperor
Joined
Sep 24, 2015
Messages
4,583
I'm gonna be controversial here - doesn't that describe our entire hobby? It doesn't do anything for the animals (except maybe preservation of some species) and is solely for our own interest and entertainment. The tarantulas are much better off in the wild and there seems to be some high horses around these boards. My B. auratum is super chill (for now) and seems to prefer to sit still on my arm (me on the floor) using her tarsal claws to pull herself as close to my skin as possible to gain body heat. If I gently nudge her she clamps down harder as to say "I aint' moving mate, get used to it" and can sit like that for a long time (maybe I should turn up the thermostat...).
Blah blah everything @Moakmeister said
 

EulersK

Arachnonomicon
Staff member
Joined
Feb 22, 2013
Messages
3,291
I respectfully disagree. Tarantulas are most definitely better off in captivity, free from predation, parasites, harsh weather, and with a constant supply of healthy food and fresh water. Very few tarantulas survive until adulthood, which is why they give birth to hundreds of spiderlings. They are terribly lucky to be born in captivity.
Hmmm. You are changing my mind, Sir.
Note that @Moakmeister's argument does not apply to anything but invertebrates. Everything that he brought up would be true of a tiger held in a small cage, but a tiger would be much happier living in the wild. Invertebrates lack higher cognitive function - to them, so long as they're kept properly, there is no difference between the floors of the Amazon or the cage of a keeper.
 

Moakmeister

Arachnolord
Joined
Oct 6, 2016
Messages
632
Note that @Moakmeister's argument does not apply to anything but invertebrates. Everything that he brought up would be true of a tiger held in a small cage, but a tiger would be much happier living in the wild. Invertebrates lack higher cognitive function - to them, so long as they're kept properly, there is no difference between the floors of the Amazon or the cage of a keeper.
I would make the argument that a tiger COULD be happy in captivity as long as it FEELS like it's in the wild. Tigers, and most mammals, suffer in zoos because it doesn't do a good enough job replicating how it FEELS to be wild. If we were able to actually create a home for a tiger in a way that the tiger wouldn't realize it was in captivity, then it wouldn't care. And due to the absence of my aforementioned points, the tiger would be far happier in that environment. It just happens to be easy to trick a tarantula into thinking it's wild.
 

EulersK

Arachnonomicon
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Feb 22, 2013
Messages
3,291
I would make the argument that a tiger COULD be happy in captivity as long as it FEELS like it's in the wild. Tigers, and most mammals, suffer in zoos because it doesn't do a good enough job replicating how it FEELS to be wild. If we were able to actually create a home for a tiger in a way that the tiger wouldn't realize it was in captivity, then it wouldn't care. And due to the absence of my aforementioned points, the tiger would be far happier in that environment. It just happens to be easy to trick a tarantula into thinking it's wild.
It's only easy because of how little territory a tarantula needs. The largest species in this hobby need no more than a couple square feet of floor space for their territory. Tigers and lions need literal dozens of square miles. It's logistically impossible outside of simply protecting land that they already inhabit. That's the main issue here - us being able to reasonably replicate their natural environment.
 

Lucashank

Arachnosquire
Joined
Mar 8, 2017
Messages
71
It's only easy because of how little territory a tarantula needs. The largest species in this hobby need no more than a couple square feet of floor space for their territory. Tigers and lions need literal dozens of square miles. It's logistically impossible outside of simply protecting land that they already inhabit. That's the main issue here - us being able to reasonably replicate their natural environment.
Tiger VR :borg::robot:
 

Chris LXXIX

ArachnoGod
Joined
Dec 25, 2014
Messages
5,693
I would argue that anything with the intelligence to bond that has social tendencies has a chance to be happy in captivity.
I love the fact that what you said ^ wasn't considered as key factor, as if Theraphosidae and lions/tigers etc brain is the same :-s
 

cold blood

Moderator
Staff member
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Jan 19, 2014
Messages
11,934
I love the fact that what you said ^ wasn't considered as key factor, as if Theraphosidae and lions/tigers etc brain is the same :-s
Lol, yeah, I don't thing a t cares either way...that lack of emotions thing...I doubt a well kept t realizes its captive much of the time...esp. with burrowers and terrestrials.
 
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