Looking for starter sling

LegatetheWolf

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jan 31, 2017
Messages
3
Hi guys! (First post, hurray!) I've been loving my Rose hair tarantula for awhile now, she's the perfect size and she's really good at just behaving in general really. But as time has gone on I've started to want to try growing a sling. I've got the basics like feeding, housing, and the understanding they can be pretty fast when the want to be but I wanted to ask some more experienced keepers on what species would be a good one to raise first, since I'll need to learn this process over time rather than jumping in and buying a very care-depending sling.
Thanks for any help!
 

Venom1080

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Sep 24, 2015
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Aphonopelma, Brachypelma, Euathlus, Grammostola, Acanthoscurria, Nhandu, Phormictopus, Pamphobeteus, Chromatopelma, Hapalopus (very fast), Neoholothele, Lasiodora, are all fairly easy.
Nhandu, Acanthoscurria, Pampho, Phormic, Lasiodora, Hapalopus, are all a little more moisture dependent than the others.
 

LegatetheWolf

Arachnopeon
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Jan 31, 2017
Messages
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Aphonopelma, Brachypelma, Euathlus, Grammostola, Acanthoscurria, Nhandu, Phormictopus, Pamphobeteus, Chromatopelma, Hapalopus (very fast), Neoholothele, Lasiodora, are all fairly easy.
Nhandu, Acanthoscurria, Pampho, Phormic, Lasiodora, Hapalopus, are all a little more moisture dependent than the others.
Awesome! Thanks so much! I'll put some research in and try to see if I can't get one.
 

Draketeeth

Arachnoknight
Joined
Mar 22, 2015
Messages
209
Welcome to the excitement of raising a baby! Slings are cool cause you get to watch them grow, and their behavior is really interesting. I'm working on raising a few species, so here are some observations on these beginner-friendly starters.

Brachypelma albopilosum - little bulldozers. Both of mine were always rearranging their tanks and digging elaborate tunnel systems. They're clear about their "do not disturb" signs, and when they like to be fed.

Grammostola pulchripes - slower growing than the B. albo and not as prone to dig. While skittish, it resurfaces quickly and is pretty much always out and about when not disturbed. I like watching the stripes get bolder with each molt.

Alphonopelma hentzi - very frustrating little thing. Slowest growing of the three, and had this been my first, I'd probably never have gotten another. My 1/4 inch sling has been on a six month fast. Before that it molted with no noticeable growth. I will probably have to will it to my children, having never seen its mature size :rofl: On the other hand, it seems pretty bulletproof.
 

Graves6661

Arachnosquire
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Dec 31, 2015
Messages
86
I can't recommend Acanthoscurria geniculata enough. Easy to care for and exciting to watch during feeding. Also, they are great display spiders. Always out around the enclosure to view.
 

LegatetheWolf

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jan 31, 2017
Messages
3
Welcome to the excitement of raising a baby! Slings are cool cause you get to watch them grow, and their behavior is really interesting. I'm working on raising a few species, so here are some observations on these beginner-friendly starters.

Brachypelma albopilosum - little bulldozers. Both of mine were always rearranging their tanks and digging elaborate tunnel systems. They're clear about their "do not disturb" signs, and when they like to be fed.

Grammostola pulchripes - slower growing than the B. albo and not as prone to dig. While skittish, it resurfaces quickly and is pretty much always out and about when not disturbed. I like watching the stripes get bolder with each molt.

Alphonopelma hentzi - very frustrating little thing. Slowest growing of the three, and had this been my first, I'd probably never have gotten another. My 1/4 inch sling has been on a six month fast. Before that it molted with no noticeable growth. I will probably have to will it to my children, having never seen its mature size :rofl: On the other hand, it seems pretty bulletproof.
Oh cool thanks so much :) I might try for the Brachypelma albopilosum if I can find one. I really like the curlyhairs' look. About how quick do they grow?
 

PanzoN88

Arachnodemon
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Sep 15, 2014
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693
B. Albopilosum: from my experience they are definitely not the fastest growers, but nor are they slow growers. They are easy to care for. I got mine as a 1/4" sling and fast forward three years and that little sling is now a confirmed 2.5" female
 

Venom1080

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Sep 24, 2015
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B. Albopilosum: from my experience they are definitely not the fastest growers, but nor are they slow growers. They are easy to care for. I got mine as a 1/4" sling and fast forward three years and that little sling is now a confirmed 2.5" female
That would be slow...
 

cold blood

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Staff member
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Jan 19, 2014
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11,934
medium.

But the smaller they are they faster they will grow. For an albo or even a pulchripes, growth up to 2" fairly fast, but by 2", that's when growth slows and molt cycles become extended. Just keep them warmer and feed them well.

Little albos are among the better eating of Brachy slings and a very good choice, along with that aforementioned G. pulchripes.
 

Chris LXXIX

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Dec 25, 2014
Messages
5,693
Aphonopelma, Brachypelma, Euathlus, Grammostola, Acanthoscurria, Nhandu, Phormictopus, Pamphobeteus, Chromatopelma, Hapalopus (very fast), Neoholothele, Lasiodora, are all fairly easy.
Nhandu, Acanthoscurria, Pampho, Phormic, Lasiodora, Hapalopus, are all a little more moisture dependent than the others.
And Jack the Giant Killer, let's not forget Jack the Giant Killer. He loves a bit of humidity every now and then :troll:
 

Ungoliant

Malleus Aranearum
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Messages
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I can't recommend Acanthoscurria geniculata enough. Easy to care for and exciting to watch during feeding. Also, they are great display spiders. Always out around the enclosure to view.
Even as a sling, my geniculata is a voracious predator. I don't think she knows how tiny she is.
 

Draketeeth

Arachnoknight
Joined
Mar 22, 2015
Messages
209
B. Albopilosum: They are easy to care for. I got mine as a 1/4" sling and fast forward three years and that little sling is now a confirmed 2.5" female
I got mine as a 1/3" - 1/2" sling, and a year later am sitting in the 2.5" - 3" range. I'm pretty sure mine is male, but not 100%.
 

Andrea82

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Jan 12, 2016
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+1 for A.geniculata
Extremely well eaters, grow quick and even the slings ar often out and about.
 

Jeff23

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Jul 27, 2016
Messages
621
North American Aphonopelma is a great choice if you want to grow a sling for a long time. I like to look at mine with a magnifying glass to see the growth. I am not sure if seemanni grow as slow as their North American relatives.

But I love this genus so I have loads of it in multiple species. They are easy on the care and live a long time.

EDIT* A seemanni do grow faster.
 
Last edited:

Red Eunice

Arachnodemon
Joined
Mar 2, 2014
Messages
667
G. pulchra.
Slow growth rate, a more expensive sling, but well worth it. Beautiful, large at adult size, velvety jet black. NW terrestrial, great display species, eats well (mine does) and overall "docile".
Even buying one, and turns out being male, you'll enjoy many years raising it.
 
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