Looking for Recommendations on Starter Scorpion

Astron0

Arachnopeon
Joined
Nov 24, 2021
Messages
9
Hello guys,

New to this hobby. I want to know what scorpion I should go for out of this list (these are the scorps I know for sure are near me).

Flinder’s Range Scorpion – Urodacus elongatus
Desert Scorpion – Urodacus yaschenkoi
Rainforest Scorpion – Liocheles waigiensis
Black Rock Scorpion – Urodacus manicatus
Marbled Scorpion – Lychas marmoreus

I'm thinking maybe the Desert Scorpion but I'm not sure. I'm in Perth, Western Australia.
If possible, I'd like a reference to how I should setup an enclosure with a recommended scorp (what substrate, how to heat if needed, etc, etc).

Thank you so much
 

Astron0

Arachnopeon
Joined
Nov 24, 2021
Messages
9
Arid type is always easier to take care of, in my opinion.
Thanks for the reply. Yeah I was already considering one that's accustomed to dry conditions. Any idea how I would set an enclosure up for the Urodacus Yaschenkoi? I've seen setups where some people literally just put sand and a lid with wet tissue for hydration whereas others run a tube that allows for watering of the bottom layer of the substrate as well as different substrate that allow them to create a sufficient burrow.
 

scolopendra277

Arachnoknight
Joined
May 22, 2020
Messages
248
Hello guys,

New to this hobby. I want to know what scorpion I should go for out of this list (these are the scorps I know for sure are near me).

Flinder’s Range Scorpion – Urodacus elongatus
Desert Scorpion – Urodacus yaschenkoi
Rainforest Scorpion – Liocheles waigiensis
Black Rock Scorpion – Urodacus manicatus
Marbled Scorpion – Lychas marmoreus

I'm thinking maybe the Desert Scorpion but I'm not sure. I'm in Perth, Western Australia.
If possible, I'd like a reference to how I should setup an enclosure with a recommended scorp (what substrate, how to heat if needed, etc, etc).

Thank you so much
Hey, I'm from Australia too and found Urodacus spp. good starter species. They are more active than your liocheles or hormurus species. Lychas are fun, though they are small and fast. I would go with U.elongatus, as manicatus is more aggressive. If you go with a flinders, you shouldn't really need any heat at all, and sand is a good substrate. a false bottom setup also provides a humidity gradient more suited to burrowing species, and can help prevent mycosis. Another species you might want to consider is Urodacus novaehollandiae. they have the same care as flinders but with different colouring.
 

Astron0

Arachnopeon
Joined
Nov 24, 2021
Messages
9
Hey, I'm from Australia too and found Urodacus spp. good starter species. They are more active than your liocheles or hormurus species. Lychas are fun, though they are small and fast. I would go with U.elongatus, as manicatus is more aggressive. If you go with a flinders, you shouldn't really need any heat at all, and sand is a good substrate. a false bottom setup also provides a humidity gradient more suited to burrowing species, and can help prevent mycosis. Another species you might want to consider is Urodacus novaehollandiae. they have the same care as flinders but with different colouring.
Thanks for the information!
1. You reckon Yaschenkoi is just as good as Flinders for a starter? I've heard that they're more aggressive but I'm not really looking to handle my scorpions either way. (I've also heard they may be slightly more active).
2. Within regards to the sand, would I need some kind of special desert sand? I've heard that loose sand doesn't really allow the semi-fossorial species to burrow without them collapsing.
3. A setup of false bottom would include small pebbels/gravels on the bottom of the tank, then mesh on top, then finally substrate, right?
4. How would I go about with moisture? Just have a shallow water container with a sponge? Or do the other method where you have a PVC tube that goes to the bottom layer of the substrate?

Thanks again
 

scolopendra277

Arachnoknight
Joined
May 22, 2020
Messages
248
Thanks for the information!
1. You reckon Yaschenkoi is just as good as Flinders for a starter? I've heard that they're more aggressive but I'm not really looking to handle my scorpions either way. (I've also heard they may be slightly more active).
2. Within regards to the sand, would I need some kind of special desert sand? I've heard that loose sand doesn't really allow the semi-fossorial species to burrow without them collapsing.
3. A setup of false bottom would include small pebbels/gravels on the bottom of the tank, then mesh on top, then finally substrate, right?
4. How would I go about with moisture? Just have a shallow water container with a sponge? Or do the other method where you have a PVC tube that goes to the bottom layer of the substrate?

Thanks again
1) Well, their aggression varies, I've heard of individuals just as docile as flinders as well as highly aggressive. I would just go with the flinders, less chance of buying something really aggressive. yaschenkoi is also smaller, not sure if that's better for you or worse.
2) just desert sand works. they aren't really fossorial, they just make scrapes under rocks and thing like that.
3) yes, that seems good.
4) the tube method gives you the humidity gradient, go with that if you can.
 

Astron0

Arachnopeon
Joined
Nov 24, 2021
Messages
9
1) Well, their aggression varies, I've heard of individuals just as docile as flinders as well as highly aggressive. I would just go with the flinders, less chance of buying something really aggressive. yaschenkoi is also smaller, not sure if that's better for you or worse.
2) just desert sand works. they aren't really fossorial, they just make scrapes under rocks and thing like that.
3) yes, that seems good.
4) the tube method gives you the humidity gradient, go with that if you can.
Thank you so much. I'll look to getting the Flinders then. One more question, do you reckon I should invest in some heating later on when Winter hits? Here in Perth temperatures can fall to around 10 degrees celsius at night and 18 in the day, not sure if they can sustain that at all.
 

scolopendra277

Arachnoknight
Joined
May 22, 2020
Messages
248
Thank you so much. I'll look to getting the Flinders then. One more question, do you reckon I should invest in some heating later on when Winter hits? Here in Perth temperatures can fall to around 10 degrees celsius at night and 18 in the day, not sure if they can sustain that at all.
It'll probably survive, but I'd still get one just in case. just make sure it's placed on the side of the enclosure, not the bottom, and don't let it get too hot.
 

Astron0

Arachnopeon
Joined
Nov 24, 2021
Messages
9
It'll probably survive, but I'd still get one just in case. just make sure it's placed on the side of the enclosure, not the bottom, and don't let it get too hot.
Yep, thanks. Oh, forgot to mention; if I were to get heating, should I turn it off at night? I'm unsure because I've read a few threads of people suggesting to turn the heating off at night and only leave it on to regulate the recommended 22-28 degrees temperature during the day. Unfortunately many guides I've read don't specifiy much else on the temperatures.
 

scolopendra277

Arachnoknight
Joined
May 22, 2020
Messages
248
Yep, thanks. Oh, forgot to mention; if I were to get heating, should I turn it off at night? I'm unsure because I've read a few threads of people suggesting to turn the heating off at night and only leave it on to regulate the recommended 22-28 degrees temperature during the day. Unfortunately many guides I've read don't specifiy much else on the temperatures.
those temperatures seem good. the nighttime temps should be lower, and whether you do this with a timed rheostat or just unplug it is your choice. try to have a thermostat if you can, and if not monitor temperatures carefully. turning off heating seems good, just make sure temps don't drop too much during the night.
 

Astron0

Arachnopeon
Joined
Nov 24, 2021
Messages
9
those temperatures seem good. the nighttime temps should be lower, and whether you do this with a timed rheostat or just unplug it is your choice. try to have a thermostat if you can, and if not monitor temperatures carefully. turning off heating seems good, just make sure temps don't drop too much during the night.
I see. Thank you for all the help.
 

darkness975

Latrodectus
Arachnosupporter +
Joined
Aug 31, 2012
Messages
4,545
Noted. Weird cause I've seen other people recommend them or tissues lol. Thanks anyway, I'll be doing the PVC tube method that goes down to the false bottom in a corner.
You should still offer a small water dish.

Tissues? Where did you see that? That's even worse.
 

Astron0

Arachnopeon
Joined
Nov 24, 2021
Messages
9
You should still offer a small water dish.

Tissues? Where did you see that? That's even worse.
I think on youtube somewhere or on here. Can't quite remember.

Edit: I now recall it was both on Youtube and a care sheet. I've since learnt that both should be taken with a grain of salt.
 
Last edited:

Dry Desert

Arachnoangel
Active Member
Joined
Mar 9, 2016
Messages
933
Noted. Weird cause I've seen other people recommend them or tissues lol. Thanks anyway, I'll be doing the PVC tube method that goes down to the false bottom in a corner.
You need to maintain a temperature of between 26 - 28c daytime. If you can adjust your thermostat to give around 20c at night, that would be good.
I wouldn't advise switching any heating off for arid species.
Switching heating off allows cooling, cooling = condensation = mycosis.
Any excess moisture should be avoided at all times, it will probably obtain all its moisture from its prey. You can add a small bottle cap of water once every 7/10 days and only leave it in overnight.
I appreciate it becomes very cold in the deserts overnight, however it will not be in the desert and unable to find warmer sand overnight. It will be relying on you to maintain a decent temperature, day and night.
Try and stick to the above temperatures and that should avoid any problems with mycosis.

Edit. Most care sheets on YouTube need to be taken with a Boulder of salt, not a grain.
 

darkness975

Latrodectus
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Joined
Aug 31, 2012
Messages
4,545
I think on youtube somewhere or on here. Can't quite remember.

Edit: I now recall it was both on Youtube and a care sheet. I've since learnt that both should be taken with a grain of salt.
Definitely no tissues or sponges. Care sheets are usually wrong. Stick to here.
 
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