Locusta migratoria as feeder ?

Vys

Arachnoprince
Old Timer
Joined
Sep 22, 2002
Messages
1,571
Is this locust a viable feeder-option for T's? (grown T's)
I would go and find out how big the thing gets, and if it has any natural weapons, however I'd be surprised if I can even get this posted since my quota is at -40/40 again :/
 

Vys

Arachnoprince
Old Timer
Joined
Sep 22, 2002
Messages
1,571
What, no one has a clue ? They are common feeder animals, at least for reptiles, aren't they ?
 

conipto

ArachnoPrincess
Old Timer
Joined
Sep 27, 2002
Messages
1,258
Hey Vys,

I would imagine your lack of response is due in part to the fact that noone really breeds these things, and they are somewhat rare in the wild (though there are annual species in some areas) Also, they have a tendency to look like they are piercing hooks into tree bark, and this might dissuade someone from considering it as a feeder, whether or not it is capable of hurting a T.

What I do know, is that they are quite the eaters, and if one got stuck in with a T when it molted, I'd assume the results would be bad. But I'm paranoid, and make these assumptions based on my limited intellect, not any factual evidence.

Bill
 

Vys

Arachnoprince
Old Timer
Joined
Sep 22, 2002
Messages
1,571
But you respond! :)


Hmm..bark-piercing hooks eh? Maybe not many private persons grow them, but they seem to be readily available from american feeder-animal sellers, so I just thought someone'd tried them.
Also, many general caresheets for tarantulas out there call locusts good food. Perhaps that isn't the kind I've listed though, I don't know. This is where all locustfreaks come in, not silence :)
 

Code Monkey

Arachnoemperor
Old Timer
Joined
Jul 22, 2002
Messages
3,786
Just how many locust freaks do you think are out there? ;) And of them, how many are on this board, hmmm?

When looking for feeders, I went roaches - produce continually and very little maintenance. I'm sure that something like captive reared locusts/grasshoppers would be a good feeder in principle, but since they must be something along the lines of crickets, more work than I want to put into my feeders.

On the practical side of what teeny advice I can give: I have occasionally fed grasshoppers to Ts. Unless you maim them first by cutting off their jumping legs below the "knees", they'll spend all of their time on top of your cage - not an issue with arboreas but makes them difficult feeders for terrestrials. Similarly, every T I've ever seen is often reluctant to mess with an intact grasshopper because of how far and violently those things can leap.

For an obscure topic like this, you might have to farm out to the herp boards and even insect enthusiasts versus us crossover nuts :)
 

Vys

Arachnoprince
Old Timer
Joined
Sep 22, 2002
Messages
1,571
Hmm, I do thank you for your reply eventhough I didn't get the crossover comment.

As for cutting their legs, I don't think so. It would be as funny for me as gutting little mice before throwing them to the predator.
Good to know mostly arboreals touch living (and hale) hoppers though!

As for the topic itself, I had a feeling this would be considered obscure, but logic told me : "Why the hell would it ? It's evidently a common feeder animal and since it's relatively like a cricket, there should be lots of experience people herearound. No? Now leave me alone, I'm busy trying to drive this software engineering student to madness"
 

Code Monkey

Arachnoemperor
Old Timer
Joined
Jul 22, 2002
Messages
3,786
By crossover, I mean that the primary interest on these boards is predatory arachnids and myriopods. Insect interest is largely either because we just happen to like them (e.g. mantids, assassin bugs, etc.) or because we can feed them to the predatory inverts.

I've never heard of anyone raising locusts/grasshoppers solely for invert food, but there are people who raise them just in and of themselves for the more ornamental species. These folks can probably give you good advice, but they're unlikely to be on this board.
 

ArachnoJoost

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
Joined
Aug 6, 2002
Messages
533
Every week I buy about 10 locusts (full grown locusta migratoria) for my chameleon. The only T that I have that could tackle the locusts is the rose hair, but she's afraid of them hoppers (even with cut off legs). The rest of my t's are still too small, but I would imagine my parahybana would like the locusts when he/she grows a little bigger.
Breeding locusts is a bit difficult, you need high temps for that, and since they are available in the petshops here, I don't bother.
greetz,
Joost
 

Alonso99

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
Joined
Sep 18, 2002
Messages
536
yes

I have never seen locust as feeders in petstores here in Maryland. I have seen many European sites that offer them.
 

Wade

Arachnoking
Old Timer
Joined
Aug 16, 2002
Messages
2,933
Locusts (or grasshoppers) are not cultured in the US by many people. This is at least in part due to the policies of the US Department of Agriculture, who consider them to be "potential plant pests". The importation and interstate transit of all plant-feeding insects is controlled, with a few exceptions (Archea domestica (house cricket) being one). This is the same reason why it is impossible for us to get exotic phasmids legally.

Wade
 

Vys

Arachnoprince
Old Timer
Joined
Sep 22, 2002
Messages
1,571
Thanks for your replies,
Joost ; She's afraid of legless hoppers? :) Hmm...smaller 'normal' grasshoppers as well?

Ah, I'd have probably got it without the 'herps' CM :)

I wasn't considering actually raising them since I take it they'd eat me out of the house, but I'm sure my avic'd like some exotics
 

chaset

Arachnosquire
Old Timer
Joined
Sep 9, 2002
Messages
120
Locust

Locust are a all to big problem in this Area, I would not feed them to my T's because there is lots of pesticeds used around here.
They said on the local news sometime back that we were averaging about 3000 locust per acre
 

Wade

Arachnoking
Old Timer
Joined
Aug 16, 2002
Messages
2,933
If they're not captively cultured, I'd be hesitant to use them for the reasons Chaset describes. I think many keepers of herps in Europe do, in fact, rear them as feeders. I suspect there's nothing wrong with them, but I can't say for sure either way since I have no experience with them.

One word of caution...they have very powerful, chewing jaws, and some species are at least partially carniverous. I probably would not leave a large one in a tarantulas cage unattended.

Wade
 

Vys

Arachnoprince
Old Timer
Joined
Sep 22, 2002
Messages
1,571
Well, I've ordered a few now anyways. I hope they won't arrive stone dead..I actually told them in my order to send a bunch of B.Dubia instead if they thought the locusts would be more vulnerable to the cold. So either way, there's interesting (and hopefully live) food coming :)
 
Top