List of scorpions with medically significant stings

NJarachnidFan

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jun 21, 2016
Messages
10
Was curious if their is a complete list of all scorpions with medically significant venom? From what I have come across when I Google it I have seen their is supposedly only 25 scorpions that fit that definition. So what are the 25?

People on here seem to be pretty knowledgeable so I was wondering if an actual list doesn't exist if people on this forum can come up with one even if it doesn't have all 25. It doesn't have to be an exact order but listed as best as possible starting with the ones most likely to cause death or hospitalization. But I don't mean ones just responsible for killing the most people in their native area because of high contact with humans, poor medical facilities etc. The ones if I had them as a pet I personally would be at risk.

The reason I want this list is I want to expand my collection in the future and it would be helpful to have a list to look at to know what species I should be more cautious to own. Some of the scorpions I look up I haven't been able to find any info on venom potency at all. At least if I could get a list like that it would let me know if it's not listed I'm most likely fine.
 

WeightedAbyss75

Arachnoangel
Joined
Feb 22, 2014
Messages
921
Most Parabuthus species you'd want to stay away from. VERY high venom toxicity and they inject large amounts of it. Also, there's the infamous Deathstalker (L. quinquestriatus) and any Androctonus species. Other than that, there aren't many other life threatening scorps. Take this with a pinch of salt though, I only own one scorpion at the moment. Also, word of caution, P. tranvaalicus and a select few can shoot venom from the tail. Personally, I think outside of these species (and a few more I'm probably forgetting), you'd be good with any species out there. ( Honorable mentions are Hottentotta, Centroides, Babycurus )
 

Angron

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jul 10, 2008
Messages
37
Looks like all but two or so of the scorpions on that list are Buthids. The Buthidae family has some of the most beautiful and interesting scorpions in my opinion.
 

WeightedAbyss75

Arachnoangel
Joined
Feb 22, 2014
Messages
921
Looks like all but two or so of the scorpions on that list are Buthids. The Buthidae family has some of the most beautiful and interesting scorpions in my opinion.
True. Although most of the time (sadly) beautiful=deadly. Hottentotta seems to be more amazing in color IMO and has less potent venom :D I just want one so bad
 

NJarachnidFan

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jun 21, 2016
Messages
10
True. Although most of the time (sadly) beautiful=deadly. Hottentotta seems to be more amazing in color IMO and has less potent venom :D I just want one so bad
Which is why I asked for the list to begin with, seems like I will see a photo of a beautiful scorpion just to find out it's a little out my league for the time being. I can see myself getting them down the road anyway I would just like to stay clear of anything too serious for now until I build experience.

But I will admit the more attractive ones seem to be the ones I might have to hold off on because they seem to have made the list.
 

NJarachnidFan

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jun 21, 2016
Messages
10
Something else I would like to ask because I'm a little confused after reading old threads and sting reports... in general is death rare for the majority of scorpions even on the "hot" side? I see scorpions listed as deadly on one thread then find out while extremely painful people seem to be alive to tell the tale and in some cases with out even having to seek medical attention.

So is it more like getting stung by certain species the death rate is lower then the survival rate but its like Russian roulette and the more potent ones just might have a extra round or two in the chamber?

If most of the medically significant species aren't necessarily deadly which are the ones ok to own and fall more along the lines of a OBT or Pokie in the tarantula world where you know you aren't gonna die but the venom isn't nothing you want to experience.(I know the venom is different this is an example)...So what I'm saying is what's some good stepping stone species that aren't deadly but just require respect and caution.
 

shining

Arachnodemon
Joined
Jul 15, 2011
Messages
755
Something like that is exactly what I was looking for thanks.

Anything that should be added to that list that might be missing? That question is open to anybody to add their two cents by the way.
You're welcome. Also, it is family, not genus, my pre-nap brain fart. I'm glad the others caught that before you spread that. :)

Don't know about any missing but that list does cover most of what you'd find in the hobby.
 

WeightedAbyss75

Arachnoangel
Joined
Feb 22, 2014
Messages
921
Something else I would like to ask because I'm a little confused after reading old threads and sting reports... in general is death rare for the majority of scorpions even on the "hot" side? I see scorpions listed as deadly on one thread then find out while extremely painful people seem to be alive to tell the tale and in some cases with out even having to seek medical attention.

So is it more like getting stung by certain species the death rate is lower then the survival rate but its like Russian roulette and the more potent ones just might have a extra round or two in the chamber?

If most of the medically significant species aren't necessarily deadly which are the ones ok to own and fall more along the lines of a OBT or Pokie in the tarantula world where you know you aren't gonna die but the venom isn't nothing you want to experience.(I know the venom is different this is an example)...So what I'm saying is what's some good stepping stone species that aren't deadly but just require respect and caution.
Babycurus could be a good option. Needs a little more humidity than desrt scorps, but still not bad. They stay very small and are beautiful. Also an R. junceus communal could be nice. Very colorful, relatively small, and the pokie/obt mentality you're talking about.
 

WeightedAbyss75

Arachnoangel
Joined
Feb 22, 2014
Messages
921
Also Flatrocks are some of the best. Low venom, MASSIVE size, and long lived. The ultimate beginner scorp IMO. Also, very unique look. Like scorpion a la roadkill.
 

Angron

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jul 10, 2008
Messages
37
Something else I would like to ask because I'm a little confused after reading old threads and sting reports... in general is death rare for the majority of scorpions even on the "hot" side? I see scorpions listed as deadly on one thread then find out while extremely painful people seem to be alive to tell the tale and in some cases with out even having to seek medical attention.

So is it more like getting stung by certain species the death rate is lower then the survival rate but its like Russian roulette and the more potent ones just might have a extra round or two in the chamber?

If most of the medically significant species aren't necessarily deadly which are the ones ok to own and fall more along the lines of a OBT or Pokie in the tarantula world where you know you aren't gonna die but the venom isn't nothing you want to experience.(I know the venom is different this is an example)...So what I'm saying is what's some good stepping stone species that aren't deadly but just require respect and caution.
If you want get into keeping any sort of Buthid I recommend Centruroides gracilis or Rhopalurus junceus. Neither of them is particularly dangerous though I certainly wouldn't want to be stung by one. They both also get to around 3 inches and are quite beautiful, R. junceus especially. Both can also be kept communally and are easy to breed from what I understand.

I've had a few C. gracilis for several months now and just got two R. junceus today. I'm very pleased with both species and intend to get more as finances allow.
 

NJarachnidFan

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jun 21, 2016
Messages
10
Babycurus could be a good option. Needs a little more humidity than desrt scorps, but still not bad. They stay very small and are beautiful. Also an R. junceus communal could be nice. Very colorful, relatively small, and the pokie/obt mentality you're talking about.
Good to know Babycurus gigas and Babycurus jacksoni were on my list for that genus. Actually was thinking of ordering some soon.

As for R. junceus I actually have two already only had them a few weeks. Currently have two of them but probably will get a few more. I have a pair of P. dictator and two Euscorpiops vachoni. I have a room dedicated to pets so I already know I plan on expanding the scorpion collection on top of my tarantula, snake, mantis collection. Be nice to have enough to justify a few feeder insect colonies :)
 

NJarachnidFan

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jun 21, 2016
Messages
10
Also Flatrocks are some of the best. Low venom, MASSIVE size, and long lived. The ultimate beginner scorp IMO. Also, very unique look. Like scorpion a la roadkill.
I actually do like them and plan one getting at least one but for the most part I am interested in species I find some what exotic and visually appealing. I feel like they are so common I'm in no rush to buy one since they seem to be one of the four most available. I'm trying to build a nice collection of scorpions over time, it just sucks my local reptile expo bans scorpions so I have no breeders to ask questions like I would for my snakes or Ts. Good thing I found this forum at least.
 

NJarachnidFan

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jun 21, 2016
Messages
10
If you want get into keeping any sort of Buthid I recommend Centruroides gracilis or Rhopalurus junceus. Neither of them is particularly dangerous though I certainly wouldn't want to be stung by one. They both also get to around 3 inches and are quite beautiful, R. junceus especially. Both can also be kept communally and are easy to breed from what I understand.

I've had a few C. gracilis for several months now and just got two R. junceus today. I'm very pleased with both species and intend to get more as finances allow.
C.gracilis was another on the list, also good to know!

Like I replied to another poster I actually have a couple R. junceus but are R. garridoi similar in care? Those interest me as well. Some of the Uroplectes also seem very appealing.
 

Angron

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jul 10, 2008
Messages
37
I've not kept R. garridoi so I can't really say, but in my (admittedly limited) experience most bark scorpions have relatively similar care requirements, so I wouldn't think it'd be too different than R. junceus.

I'd like to get some Babycurus gigas as well.
 

brolloks

Arachnobaron
Joined
Apr 6, 2016
Messages
348
I would add Hemiscorpius lepturus to the list. If you don't die from the venom you will surely have serious complications and nasty wounds that are difficult to heal.

The golden rule is: Any scorpion should be handled with extreme care as long as their venom status is unknown. (And not to say that those with a know status should not be handled with care) ;)
 

brolloks

Arachnobaron
Joined
Apr 6, 2016
Messages
348
So is it more like getting stung by certain species the death rate is lower then the survival rate but its like Russian roulette and the more potent ones just might have a extra round or two in the chamber?
There are a lot of factors that play a role such as your health, weight, immune response, amount of venom delivered by the sting etc.
It is like playing Russian roulette I guess. Safer to not take that chance I would say.
 

G. Carnell

Arachnoemperor
Old Timer
Joined
Oct 27, 2003
Messages
3,611
Odonturus dentatus (looks V similar to B.jacksoni) has also been responsible for a few deaths in Tanzania/Kenya IIRC
 
Top