Lilly Sleeping? - Rosea

kingrattus

Arachnoknight
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Apr 28, 2010
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It was about 3am~4am when I was roaming about in my critter room. I Check on Lilly many times a day to see if shes made an egg sac, so far, no.

Last night I think she was in a deep sleep, as her fangs were out. I was a little concerned so I gently tapped on the lid, & she put her fangs where they should be & moved a little.

I feel bad for waking her (if she was even sleeping), but darn if I know what a T looks like while sleeping LOL

So, was she sleeping?
 

Moltar

ArachnoGod
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I think that what we perceive as the difference between sleeping and wakefulness doesn't really exist for animals without advanced brain function. I bet it's more just periods of activity and inactivity. There may not be a difference between a tarantula at rest and a "sleeping" tarantula. I mean, they can't even close their eyes.
 

CAK

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Oh, I have no idea either way. I do know, that during the day when there are not any external disturbances and I do spider duty or have to move a critter to the side to top off a dish or something, it might take a nudge or two and then they perk up and move... And... after about 9pm they all come alive and never even think about needing to touch them to move them.

Is it sleeping? Probably not, but do I think they are 100% focused on their surroundings? Probably not.

Just my two cents.
 

AgentD006las

Arach-how about..NO
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I know a way to find out! Stick your finger in its mouth and if it doesnt bite you immediately than its sleeping {D
 

joes2828

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There was nothing in this link that actually answered the question. It's just a bunch of mixed opinions, as this thread will soon be.
That's why I posted it :) I was bringing up the sleeping T's discussion about information with no scientific evidence to support it.
 

kingrattus

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There may not be a difference between a tarantula at rest and a "sleeping" tarantula. I mean, they can't even close their eyes.
Fish can't close their eyes & they sleep.

I'm leaning more towards they can sleep, if there is no other explanation as to why her fangs were out.
 

J.huff23

Arachnoking
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Fish can't close their eyes & they sleep.

I'm leaning more towards they can sleep, if there is no other explanation as to why her fangs were out.
There are definitly more explanations. It could have been grooming itself.
 

Jaymz Bedell

Arachnoknight
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Dec 19, 2009
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I'm with Jake on this one. the first thing that came to mind for me was grooming or a pause while stretching. I've kept many tarantulas over the years and spent a lot of time researching them and I don't recall a time of them resting with their fangs extended. I'm not discounting the possibility of sleeping, just stating my observations and 2 of many things that popped into my mind.
 

kingrattus

Arachnoknight
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Apr 28, 2010
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Hmmm.. maybe, but do they normally keep their fangs out for about 5 mins when grooming? I also didn't see any of her legs up as if she was grooming them. I've seen her groom many times & there was always 1 leg up.
 

xhexdx

ArachnoGod
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Can you name any animals that typically bare their teeth while sleeping? Specifically invertebrates?

5 mins is hardly enough time to conclude that the spider is asleep.

It can even be argued that animals aren't completely stationary while sleeping, so really using the 'fangs out' reasoning isn't all that concrete anyway.
 

joes2828

Arachnosquire
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To add to what Joe said ^ ...if this was the behavior the exhibited during their "sleep" cycle, I think T keepers would see this as very common...and as you can see, it's not.
 

Musicwolf

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Jul 2, 2010
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My grandpa used to sleep with his teeth out too :D . . . perhaps that doesn't really help in this situation though.

Like others, I doubt that what tarantulas do could actually be defined as "sleep." However, it's obvious that they have periods of rest and they aren't as "aware" of what's going on. Maybe it's just confusion because of the daylight and bad eyesight, or maybe there's more to it. Either way, it hasn't been proven to my knowledge, but I don't correct my daughters when they say that my Ts are "napping."
 
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