Lifespan question for long time tarantula keepers

Joanie

Arachnoknight
Old Timer
Joined
Nov 4, 2002
Messages
205
Has anybody out there put together any kind of data or list of known captive lifespans for various species? I often read that lifespans of particular species are "longer" or "shorter", and of course there's loads of rough estimates out there, but I was wondering if anyone had actually compiled data from keepers who have cared for individual spiders from hatching till death.

I know, with all the trading and selling, that many of us don't keep all of our spiders from hatching till death, but there's gotta be enough of us with enough long-term pets to put together some hard data on lifespans.
 

Musicwolf

Arachnoknight
Joined
Jul 2, 2010
Messages
283
Has anybody out there put together any kind of data or list of known captive lifespans for various species? I often read that lifespans of particular species are "longer" or "shorter", and of course there's loads of rough estimates out there, but I was wondering if anyone had actually compiled data from keepers who have cared for individual spiders from hatching till death.

I know, with all the trading and selling, that many of us don't keep all of our spiders from hatching till death, but there's gotta be enough of us with enough long-term pets to put together some hard data on lifespans.
I'm interested in this information too, but I expect that there isn't much info. out there because even the folks that keep them wouldn't necessarily have many spiders die of "natural" causes. Most end up having a bad molt it seems that eventually takes them. While you may consider that a "natural" cause - - it always makes us feel like we should have done something better and the spider may have continued living.
 

Salt

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jan 23, 2011
Messages
36
Spiders have only really been a popular pet for the last 10 years. In that time, keepers get tarantulas from the wild, so they don't know how old they are, or raise them from spiderlings, in which case they're either still alive now or have died from disease or poor living conditions.

"Lists" of tarantula lifespans won't be around for a while.
 

NikiP

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
Joined
Apr 16, 2006
Messages
540
Spiders have only really been a popular pet for the last 10 years. In that time, keepers get tarantulas from the wild, so they don't know how old they are, or raise them from spiderlings, in which case they're either still alive now or have died from disease or poor living conditions.

"Lists" of tarantula lifespans won't be around for a while.
Bullhockey.

The original Tarantula Keeper's Guide by Stanley A. Schultz was written in 1984. And even if it was written when people really started getting into keeping tarantulas, people would have still have kept them for a while for there to be a need for that book & to provide the experience to write from.

Here's a bit about Stan keeping tarantulas, selling them for even longer, http://people.ucalgary.ca/~schultz/g1.html

Pretty sure he's not the only one who's been involved in keeping tarantulas for years.
 

Suidakkra

Arachnosquire
Arachnosupporter
Joined
Nov 23, 2010
Messages
147
I grew up in the 80's and I remember the big craze over the Brachypelma smithi, that's how it became the icon tarantula. That craze also lead up to the banning of exportation later on, which is still in effect.

My oldest brother in the late 80's, kept what I now believe was an Aphonopelma henzti for nearly 12 years, and it was a Wild Caught adult.

Also there are many specimens of tarantula that have been recorded to live for 20,25 and even 30 years. In fact, there are highly reputable tarantula keepers on this forum that have specimens in the 20 year range.

Jon3800 on Youtube (dont know his Arachnoboards name),has a Brachypelma albopilosum that is 26 years of age, and another specimen that is in the 22 year range, but I cannot remember at this time what species it was, it is mentioned in several of his videos.

Robc , has several specimens that are really old as well.

Those are just two examples, of many.

Many captive specimens lifespans are in fact known, with the exception of the rarer specimens that are not in captivity.
 

codykrr

Arachnoking
Old Timer
Joined
Sep 22, 2008
Messages
3,113
Spiders have only really been a popular pet for the last 10 years. In that time, keepers get tarantulas from the wild, so they don't know how old they are, or raise them from spiderlings, in which case they're either still alive now or have died from disease or poor living conditions.

"Lists" of tarantula lifespans won't be around for a while.
apparently you missed a lot of time. haha.

Tarantulas have been popular since the late 60's early 70s. Id say they exploded in sales in the 80's with the B. smithi(like mentioned).

Also for the OP. I doubt there will ever be a definitive guideline for taratula life spans just because of the simple fact they vary greatly on how the keeper keeps them.

Ranging from temp, humidity, feeding..ect

To many variables to get a set life span IMHO. we can get a very *general* idea. but nothing to predictable.
 

Salt

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jan 23, 2011
Messages
36
Ah, I wasn't suggesting nobody kept tarantulas 30 years ago. Only that not nearly enough people to compose a list of the life spans of even half the tarantulas.

---------- Post added at 06:50 PM ---------- Previous post was at 06:46 PM ----------

My apologies, I didn't mean to imply nobody has kept tarantulas until 10 years ago, all I meant was that before then there weren't really enough keepers to compose a (significant) list of tarantula lifespans.

Woops. Internet playing up.
 

Imbrium

Arachnopeon
Joined
Mar 31, 2009
Messages
48
I think there were plenty of keepers to compose a list, but maybe they had mostly wild caught back then?
 
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