Leiurus Quinquestriatus death, is my husbandry at fault?

JaleelJuice

Arachnopeon
Joined
Aug 30, 2021
Messages
9
Hey everyone, I'm new to scorpion keeping and just had my first death. I recently got this adult LQ in the mail 6 days ago, I've attempted feeding twice and no interest at all. The temperature of my room is upper 70s- low 80s and the lid was a standard kritter keeper lid with lots of ventilation. The substrate is a mixture of bone dry coco fiber and desert sand. I'm not sure if I'm just stupid and my husbandry killed them, or if the overnight shipping damaged them in some way. Thanks in advance
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Joey Spijkers

Arachnobaron
Active Member
Joined
Feb 20, 2019
Messages
351
After 6 days, I’m pretty sure it’s not your husbandry. This species is fairly hardy, so unless you did something really weird (which it doesn’t sound like at all) it’s not going to die within 6 days unless something was already wrong. Keep in mind this is a species that is still often wild caught, and wild caught animals are less stable than captive bred. Before it came to you, it had already had a long journey to get to the supplier.

I would personally keep desert species like this a bit warmer, about 80-90 fahrenheit, but the temperatures you have are definitely not what killed it. I’m not experienced with Leiurus though.
 

Outpost31Survivor

Arachnoangel
Active Member
Joined
Aug 23, 2019
Messages
967
Hey everyone, I'm new to scorpion keeping and just had my first death. I recently got this adult LQ in the mail 6 days ago, I've attempted feeding twice and no interest at all. The temperature of my room is upper 70s- low 80s and the lid was a standard kritter keeper lid with lots of ventilation. The substrate is a mixture of bone dry coco fiber and desert sand. I'm not sure if I'm just stupid and my husbandry killed them, or if the overnight shipping damaged them in some way. Thanks in advance
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I keep mine at 85F-95F (usually hovering around 90F). It looks like wild caught specimen and due to its darker and duller coloration means it was an old specimen. It could be a natural death. But Deathstalkers truly thrive at 85F-95F (night drops 70F-80F is perfectly fine). It was old but also those aren't the preferable temps and may have depressed its metabolism which can increase digestion and decrease feeding frequency.

Is its aculeus missing?
 

Dylan Keife

Arachnosquire
Arachnosupporter
Joined
Nov 27, 2017
Messages
114
Looks like it was probably on its way out already. Probably old or suffering from mycosis or something similar. Not your fault, but the temps should be higher for future reference
 
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