Lawn shrimp(Arcitalitrus sylvaticus)

dtknow

Arachnoking
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Anyone(socally) have these around them? They seem like cool creatures and a posible live food.
 

cacoseraph

ArachnoGod
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what!

these could be a really cool new feeder. remember one of teh 17 scabies missions is to find and introduce at least one awesome new feeder species to the hobby?

hey dt, you might be interested in our alternate feeder thread. in a year or two there should be some pretty good info in it =P
 

arachnocat

Arachnoangel
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Nov 27, 2005
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Hey! We don't have lawn shrimp here. Not fair! I want some :}
 

What

Arachnoprince
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Come and get some.... I dont want to bother collecting them. :razz:
 

cacoseraph

ArachnoGod
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they looked like tiny shrimp in the 5 second google image search that netted a bugguide hit
 

What

Arachnoprince
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They literally look like little tiny non-aquatic shrimp.

Maybe Ill go catch one and take some pics...
 

Rochelle

Arachnoprince
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Where do you find these things? They seem like a great food size for small T. slings...
 

Frédérick

Arachnobaron
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Wouldn't they be a bit too rich in chitin? like mealworms...something to check up!
 

dtknow

Arachnoking
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Wouldn't matter to T's.

I know the aquatic version(gammarus or Hyallela) is bomb fish and newt food. Easy as heck to culture too. I bet the land versions would culture just like woodlice.
 

cacoseraph

ArachnoGod
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nice bmk

Eggs are deposited within a brood pouch on the underside of the adult female amphipod's body. The eggs hatch in one to three weeks. The young amphipods resemble the adults and leave the pouch during the next one to eight days when the female has her first molt during mating. The molt usually takes about one hour. And most species complete their life cycle (egg to adult) in one year or less (Smith and Whitman 1992).
both good signs for a new feeder :drool:


Most species produce only a single brood of eggs
ah. hmm... that is suboptimal but maybe not critically so


(http://creatures.ifas.ufl.edu/misc/amphipods.htm)



Most amphipods are scavengers
Amphipods are present in soft ground up to a depth of 13 mm. Leaf mold beneath shrubbery also offers a suitable habitat for terrestrial amphipods

Amphipods do not have a waxy layer on their exoskeleton as do insects. They lose or gain moisture from their environment. Too much of a water loss results in desiccation while too rapid a gain is also lethal. This is why they migrate out of rain-soaked soil to drier areas where they usually end up dying anyway. Most species are active at night.
man, sounds like you might have to be careful. ah, actually i can see a real low vent rig... a longer cage and you can just mist one side. maybe an inch of hard packed coconut fiber with an inch of semipacked leaflitter over it

i bet you could have a burly land shrimp and collembola culture and sump a quarter thimble full of the "loaded" dirt into baby bugs' cages to feed them (instead of trying to wrangle stupid microfeeders individually)
 

rattlesnake boi

Arachnopeon
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Jul 26, 2021
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Anyone(socally) have these around them? They seem like cool creatures and a posible live food.
Potentially a good live food, they would have to be rlly quick at catching them cuz they can jump rlly rlly high, culturing them as is easy as pie tho, rlly rlly moist substrate (depends on species but most like it that when u squeeze it drips) and deep substrate to, they breed every 2-3 weeks (males attach to females for this period and then once the female molts they mate, this is gurrenteed to be 100% true for aquatic ones, not to sure about terrestrial tho I do have a colony and am waiting for bebes) and other then that it's just a giant ass springtail (or jumping isopod, whichever you prefer)
 

kingshockey

Arachnodemon
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Sep 4, 2017
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i am in the sgv and have only seen em on sidewalks or concrete paths by lawns after its been flooded by steady rain(been a few years since we had rain like that). probably not worth the water bill to flood your lawn that way. just to collect them or the waiting for a heavy steady rain here in socal
 
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