Lasiodora parahybana sling help

dvillafana08

Arachnopeon
Joined
May 8, 2014
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Recently got a new sling and was wondering if anyone had any pointers. This is only my second T. Any help is awesome! Thank you!
 

BishopiMaster

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
Joined
Jul 12, 2007
Messages
358
Recently got a new sling and was wondering if anyone had any pointers. This is only my second T. Any help is awesome! Thank you!
Lasiodora Parahybana are my favorite sling to raise, because they grow so fast and have such voracious appetites.
I keep them in small mason jars, and poke 10-15 holes with a mechanics pick, the lid in my jars is metal, I use coco coir, and I prepare it as a brick, with water. You want to prepare the brick so that it is damp but not wet, if you like specifics, you can get it to the point where you can wring no water from it, but it will hold shape within your hand. After this, I take my tongs and once a week, I poke a hole down to the bottom, of course knowing where the sling is, and I fill this to the top with water and no more, it then soaks into the substrate. If your room temperature is high 60s, you are fine, I would not go lower than that. If heating is an issue for you, I use a heat pad indirectly, what I do is use a 5 gallon, I tape a heat pad to the side of it, on the outside, with foil tape, do not use duct tape as it melts at 200 degrees generally. Then, I cover the screen 3/4ths with oven foil to keep the heat in. You put the jars within this microclimate setup and keep them warm that way. You may provide a water dish if your sling is 1/2" or so but I let them get all the water from their food.
I feed 3 times a week, after your sling has molted, you have to wait for it's exoskeleton to harden or it can seriously injure itself when it eats, I use a week period for this and increment that number as the tarantula grows, because the older they get, the longer that hardening process takes.
Make sure that you use as much substrate as you can, so the risk of falls is lessened, to start them off, you can use pill vials if they are 1/4" or so, if they're a half inch I move them into a mason jar about 5-6" tall and 2" diameter, once they get about an inch to an inch and a half, you can mvoe them to a 16 oz deli cup, when you use the deli cup you can use cross ventilation. for water dishes, a soda bottle cap will suffice, or a pill vial cap, or film canister cap, you get the idea.

DISCLAIMER: You are free to extrapolate into a general context off these specifics as you see fit, if you like specifics, enjoy, if not, I am sure you can coagulate a metaphysical transformation:)
 

nicodimus22

Arachnomancer
Arachnosupporter
Joined
Sep 26, 2013
Messages
715
Recently got a new sling and was wondering if anyone had any pointers. This is only my second T. Any help is awesome! Thank you!
They're pretty easy in terms of care. The standard terrestrial setup (substrate, hide, and water dish) works well. Did you have a more specific question?
 

dvillafana08

Arachnopeon
Joined
May 8, 2014
Messages
0
Lasiodora Parahybana are my favorite sling to raise, because they grow so fast and have such voracious appetites.
I keep them in small mason jars, and poke 10-15 holes with a mechanics pick, the lid in my jars is metal, I use coco coir, and I prepare it as a brick, with water. You want to prepare the brick so that it is damp but not wet, if you like specifics, you can get it to the point where you can wring no water from it, but it will hold shape within your hand. After this, I take my tongs and once a week, I poke a hole down to the bottom, of course knowing where the sling is, and I fill this to the top with water and no more, it then soaks into the substrate. If your room temperature is high 60s, you are fine, I would not go lower than that. If heating is an issue for you, I use a heat pad indirectly, what I do is use a 5 gallon, I tape a heat pad to the side of it, on the outside, with foil tape, do not use duct tape as it melts at 200 degrees generally. Then, I cover the screen 3/4ths with oven foil to keep the heat in. You put the jars within this microclimate setup and keep them warm that way. You may provide a water dish if your sling is 1/2" or so but I let them get all the water from their food.
I feed 3 times a week, after your sling has molted, you have to wait for it's exoskeleton to harden or it can seriously injure itself when it eats, I use a week period for this and increment that number as the tarantula grows, because the older they get, the longer that hardening process takes.
Make sure that you use as much substrate as you can, so the risk of falls is lessened, to start them off, you can use pill vials if they are 1/4" or so, if they're a half inch I move them into a mason jar about 5-6" tall and 2" diameter, once they get about an inch to an inch and a half, you can mvoe them to a 16 oz deli cup, when you use the deli cup you can use cross ventilation. for water dishes, a soda bottle cap will suffice, or a pill vial cap, or film canister cap, you get the idea.

DISCLAIMER: You are free to extrapolate into a general context off these specifics as you see fit, if you like specifics, enjoy, if not, I am sure you can coagulate a metaphysical transformation:)
Thank you! Appreciate all the help, not used to a T that requires high humidity so very good to know how to keep that in check!
 

dvillafana08

Arachnopeon
Joined
May 8, 2014
Messages
0
They're pretty easy in terms of care. The standard terrestrial setup (substrate, hide, and water dish) works well. Did you have a more specific question?
No! Just making sure there aren't any specific things that may be different from my other T. I have a chroma cyan currently so the only real difference I see is the humidity levels.
 

BishopiMaster

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
Joined
Jul 12, 2007
Messages
358
Thank you! Appreciate all the help, not used to a T that requires high humidity so very good to know how to keep that in check!
Yeah, it's mainly for when they are slings, they can be kept drier when they are older, such as 2" diagonal leg span, no problem!;)
 

nicodimus22

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Joined
Sep 26, 2013
Messages
715
No! Just making sure there aren't any specific things that may be different from my other T. I have a chroma cyan currently so the only real difference I see is the humidity levels.
IMO, trying to constantly monitor and maintain a specific humidity level is a waste of time. The gauges that you find in pet shops and elsewhere are notoriously inaccurate, so you can't really trust them. A lot of newer T keepers really fixate on humidity (usually because of care sheets, which often give bad advice) and make things harder than they have to be. Overflow the water dish a little bit so that there is a small area of damp substrate around it, and let it dry out. Repeat once it's dry again.
 
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BishopiMaster

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
Joined
Jul 12, 2007
Messages
358
IMO, trying to constantly monitor and maintain a specific humidity level is a waste of time. The gauges that you find in pet shops and elsewhere are notoriously inaccurate, so you can't really trust them. A lot of newer T keepers really fixate on humidity (usually because of care sheets, which often give bad advice) and make things harder than they have to be. Overflow the water dish a little bit so that there is a small area of damp substrate around it, and let it dry out. Repeat once it's dry again.
Monitoring the dryness is more work than pouring water once a week, which is a fixed length of time.
 

cold blood

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Jan 19, 2014
Messages
12,076
Thank you! Appreciate all the help, not used to a T that requires high humidity so very good to know how to keep that in check!
An lp does not require high humidity AT ALL. As a sling keep part of the sub damp, by 1" its enclosure should be big enough for a water dish....at that point you can keep it predominantly dry for the rest of its life.

Simplify...never measure humidity...ts dont require humidity, ones you hear do, merely require damp substrate. Humidity numbers are a complete myth and only serve to overcomplicate the keeping of tarantulas....to the detriment of the t.
 

BishopiMaster

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
Joined
Jul 12, 2007
Messages
358
An lp does not require high humidity AT ALL. As a sling keep part of the sub damp, by 1" its enclosure should be big enough for a water dish....at that point you can keep it predominantly dry for the rest of its life.

Simplify...never measure humidity...ts dont require humidity, ones you hear do, merely require damp substrate. Humidity numbers are a complete myth and only serve to overcomplicate the keeping of tarantulas....to the detriment of the t.
I mean he was following what I was saying, which does not have him keep the t "high humidity", we don't want to confuse the guy by dissecting his verbage.
 

dvillafana08

Arachnopeon
Joined
May 8, 2014
Messages
0
An lp does not require high humidity AT ALL. As a sling keep part of the sub damp, by 1" its enclosure should be big enough for a water dish....at that point you can keep it predominantly dry for the rest of its life.

Simplify...never measure humidity...ts dont require humidity, ones you hear do, merely require damp substrate. Humidity numbers are a complete myth and only serve to overcomplicate the keeping of tarantulas....to the detriment of the t.
Thanks again! Damp, not humid, got it.
 

dvillafana08

Arachnopeon
Joined
May 8, 2014
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Last edited:

Andrea82

Arachnoemperor
Active Member
Joined
Jan 12, 2016
Messages
3,674
That's funny my first two slings are also an L.P and a chroma cyan. Just like the guy running the page. Definitely going to use it quite often!
Chroma cyan....euhm..you either spell it C.cyaneopubescens, or use the common term 'GBB' ;)
 

Charlottesweb17

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jan 31, 2017
Messages
34
My first Ts were l.parahybana and I love them! Have had them since Feb and they are full of attitude. They are easy to keep, great eaters ( I actually call one my garbage disposal cause it eats everything).
Glad I picked them for my first.
 

Mantuxxxazzz

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jun 20, 2017
Messages
0
Hi everyone . Bad english speaker here. :) my LP sling stoped eating its almost a week now . Everything was okey but i have it only second week , could it be in premolt ? He or she only ate 3 times . Thanks 20170629_172957.jpg 20170629_172957.jpg
 

Ungoliant

Malleus Aranearum
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Joined
Mar 7, 2012
Messages
3,916
my LP sling stoped eating its almost a week now . Everything was okey but i have it only second week , could it be in premolt ? He or she only ate 3 times .
Possibly, although since the abdomen isn't dark yet, it will probably be at least a few days.

She looks nice and plump, so I wouldn't worry.
 

Jones0911

Arachnobaron
Joined
Mar 5, 2013
Messages
406
Hi everyone . Bad english speaker here. :) my LP sling stoped eating its almost a week now . Everything was okey but i have it only second week , could it be in premolt ? He or she only ate 3 times . Thanks View attachment 244588 View attachment 244588
These are great eaters so it might be in pre molt, some Ts stop eating before their abdomens darken, some eat all the way up to a day or two before molting..... I'd say keep trying to feed it....If it doesn't eat it within 15 its probably not hungry.

These Ts eat a lot but aren't shy feeders.
 

Charlottesweb17

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jan 31, 2017
Messages
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IMG_1519.JPG
My l.parahybana almost never not eat so if they don't I know they are going to molt. They are usually like garbage disposals.
 
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