Lasiodora Parahybana (Salmon Pink Birdeater) Opinions?

Jessie Lee Goodman

Arachnopeon
Joined
Nov 27, 2016
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2
Hey y'all!
So I've been doing some looking around for my next T purchase, and I have been looking at a female L. Parahybana, and I've read some different things. I want to know some of y'all's opinions. PLEASE REPLY!!!

THANKS!
~Jessie
 

Chris LXXIX

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Dec 25, 2014
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5,693
Buy one! A female, if you can :)

Pay no attention to Lasiodora parahybana haters that I'm 100% certain you will find, that's one of the NW Theraphosidae that "are of best", a truly NW classic lovely itchy fluffy cricket eating eight legged. Care is laughable easy. Trust me :-s
 

Jessie Lee Goodman

Arachnopeon
Joined
Nov 27, 2016
Messages
2
Buy one! A female, if you can :)

Pay no attention to Lasiodora parahybana haters that I'm 100% certain you will find, that's one of the NW Theraphosidae that "are of best", a truly NW classic lovely itchy fluffy cricket eating eight legged. Care is laughable easy. Trust me :-s

What about handling wise? I can handle almost all of my T's and I love really big T's!
 

EulersK

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Feb 22, 2013
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What about handling wise? I can handle almost all of my T's and I love really big T's!
Wouldn't recommend it. Beyond the dangers and ethical concerns of handling tarantulas that I'm sure you're aware of, this species (and genus, for that matter) has some nasty setae. You'll be itching for days after doing routine maintenance, let alone handling.
 

Chris LXXIX

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Dec 25, 2014
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5,693
What about handling wise? I can handle almost all of my T's and I love really big T's!
I can't answer you because I've never handled a venomous animal nor I plan to do that because for my views about that's a very uneducated behavior towards animals we are supposed to care & love, not joke around with u_u

With that said, even Ray Charles and S.Wonder would agree that, handling for handling, a Lasiodora parahybana is better than an Atrax robustus, for those under that nonsense influence called 'handling'.
 

Rittdk01

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Oct 4, 2016
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264
I have a 6" female that im pretty cracy about. I consider them tops when all is considered. cheap, easy to care for, eats like crazy, good looking and gets really big,really fast. my lp Rachel spider is pretty defensive, so I wouldn't handle her. I'm not really sure why lp's aren't the #1 pet store tarantula????
 

chanda

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Jun 27, 2010
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I had an L. parahybana until recently (when it hooked out into a mature male and I traded it away to someone who could try to breed it). For me, it was sort of a middle-of-the-road spider. Big - but not as big as my T. stirmi. A pretty good feeder - but not as aggressive as my A. geniculata or my Pamphobeteus. Pretty - but not as colorful as B. smithi or A. versicolor and not as attractively marked as P. vittata or A. geniculata. Certainly not suitable for handling (but neither are most of the others). I wouldn't rule out getting another Lp down the road, but at the moment I'm exploring other species.
 

Walker253

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Jun 12, 2016
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556
The LP is a fantastic addition. Great eaters, fairly active, they grow fairly quickly and like to be seen.
Handling is hit and miss, but I think mostly miss. If you already have a T that you can hold, great, hold that one. Some LP's are skittish, some are hair kickers, some are mildly defensive, and some are all of those or none at all. You won't know until she gets bigger. Mine has been held, but she's a bit skittish and I'm afraid of her getting injured. I rarely handle anything anymore that I don't have to.
But really, get one, you'll love her.
 

IsraelMS

Arachnopeon
Joined
Sep 25, 2016
Messages
33
If you want a big NW terrestrial that eats every time you offer food, has personality without the agressive nature of e.g. Phormictopus, is incredibly easy to care for, a species that can be maintained in a naturalistic-type enclosure without filling it with web and is always on sight, LP is your tarantula. I love mine. There are larger, prettier, more agressive or more interesting behavior-wise tarantulas, but LP will be always fun to have.
 

ledzeppelin

Arachnobaron
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Jan 8, 2013
Messages
434
Wouldn't recommend it. Beyond the dangers and ethical concerns of handling tarantulas that I'm sure you're aware of, this species (and genus, for that matter) has some nasty setae. You'll be itching for days after doing routine maintenance, let alone handling.
Forget the setae, adult females' fangs can pierce your skull :D
 

Vanessa

Grammostola Groupie
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Mar 12, 2016
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I have an L.difficilis spiderling right now and I am enjoying them. I never would have purchased any Lasiodora species, but I received this little one as a freebie at 1/4" back in the spring. They are now around 1". I find the L.difficilis far more attractive that the L.parahybana, but that is only my personal opinion.
I have read that some people have very tolerant individuals, but the majority are not that tolerant. They are hardy, large, not really over the top defensive, and grow quickly. They never turn down a meal unless they are very close to moulting. I love that mine is always active and visible and has never burrowed.
If I were going to try to handle any tarantula - a member of this genus would not even make it on the list of possibilities.
 

Steve halward

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Sep 19, 2016
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7
An lp is a great choice, you know they are about to moult when the crickets are still walking around after 5 seconds, they bulldoze like mad so theres endless frustration when youre lovely big viv has substrate everywhere and mine are always on show..not for handling though although my biggest will happily walk out the lid if i open it but thoses fangs.....not for me
 

cold blood

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An lp is a great choice, you know they are about to moult when the crickets are still walking around after 5 seconds, they bulldoze like mad so theres endless frustration when youre lovely big viv has substrate everywhere and mine are always on show..not for handling though although my biggest will happily walk out the lid if i open it but thoses fangs.....not for me
Their growth and appetite are NO DIFFERRENT than most of the large south American terrestrials, which ALL look better. This behavior is in no way unique to a LP or any lasiodora.

Nothing wrong with a LP, just don't go buy one...for the love of god, its easily the most given away species there is. They're impossible to avoid, searching them out and buying them is like buying dandelions...you could do nothing and wait and those dandelions will eventually show up anyway.
 

Moonohol

Two Legged Freak
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Aug 8, 2016
Messages
115
I have an L.difficilis spiderling right now and I am enjoying them. I never would have purchased any Lasiodora species, but I received this little one as a freebie at 1/4" back in the spring. They are now around 1". I find the L.difficilis far more attractive that the L.parahybana, but that is only my personal opinion.
I have read that some people have very tolerant individuals, but the majority are not that tolerant. They are hardy, large, not really over the top defensive, and grow quickly. They never turn down a meal unless they are very close to moulting. I love that mine is always active and visible and has never burrowed.
If I were going to try to handle any tarantula - a member of this genus would not even make it on the list of possibilities.
My L. difficilis was my first tarantula and I can confirm that they are awesome and (IMO) much better looking than LPs. It's true that they're not much different from any other large NW terrestrial in terms of growth rate/feeding response, so ultimately you should get whatever one is the most appealing to you. I'd personally take an LD or LP over an A. geniculata or N. chromatus any day, but everybody's got different tastes! Also agree with everyone else that they definitely are not for handling. Even a few of those urticating setae will put you in a world of irritation. It's happened to me simply from sticking my hand in the enclosure to get the water dish out--she didn't even kick any hairs, they were just floating around in there.:bored:

Here's my big girl (about 5.5-6" right now):
IMG_7458.JPG
 

TomKemp

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Feb 5, 2014
Messages
159
I think an LP is a great addition to a collection if your into larger NW's. You can't beat spending a few bucks for a sling only to watch it blossom into a large tarantula in such a short amount of time. When I got mine it was my "next step up" in the new world terrestrial department. I still have her and she's fun to keep. Handling? I dunno. I never have with mine not so much because the chance of a bite as much as the urticating setae I guarantee would suck pretty bad for me. With that, To each his own.
 

Bread

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May 11, 2016
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26
I love LP's mega appetite, and always trying to redecorate it's enclosure, or swinging from the roof.
(my little girls just 3" atm)

here she is guarding the small bolus just infront of her palps.

 

cold blood

Moderator
Staff member
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Jan 19, 2014
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11,934
My L. difficilis was my first tarantula and I can confirm that they are awesome and (IMO) much better looking than LPs. It's true that they're not much different from any other large NW terrestrial in terms of growth rate/feeding response, so ultimately you should get whatever one is the most appealing to you. I'd personally take an LD or LP over an A. geniculata or N. chromatus any day, but everybody's got different tastes! Also agree with everyone else that they definitely are not for handling. Even a few of those urticating setae will put you in a world of irritation. It's happened to me simply from sticking my hand in the enclosure to get the water dish out--she didn't even kick any hairs, they were just floating around in there.:bored:

Here's my big girl (about 5.5-6" right now):
View attachment 226118
He's looking for a date if you are interested. At 6" yours should be mature.
 
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