Lasiodora difficilis Care

antsman

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Oct 3, 2016
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I got this little one as a freebie, and am not sure exactly how to keep.
Keep mostly dry, overflow the water dish occasionally, other than that basic care?
 

sasker

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Oct 9, 2016
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I think you will get more response to your question if you ask this question in the Tarantula Questions & Discussions forum.

I think you you are spot on about the care. I do not own a L. dificilis, but my L. parahybana is pretty easy to take of. I would suggest to keep the substrate slightly moist (i.e. not bone-dry), especially for a sling. Later on, you can keep one part of the substrate slightly moist and the other part dry so it can choose.

Have fun with your spider :) Lasiodora is a great genus. The spiders have massive appetites and super growth rates.
 

BishopiMaster

Arachnobaron
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Jul 12, 2007
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I think you will get more response to your question if you ask this question in the Tarantula Questions & Discussions forum.

I think you you are spot on about the care. I do not own a L. dificilis, but my L. parahybana is pretty easy to take of. I would suggest to keep the substrate slightly moist (i.e. not bone-dry), especially for a sling. Later on, you can keep one part of the substrate slightly moist and the other part dry so it can choose.

Have fun with your spider :) Lasiodora is a great genus. The spiders have massive appetites and super growth rates.
The first question is, what size is your "little one"? Because the care will vary depending on that.
 

sasker

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I assume it is a sling, as he called it 'little one'. Anyway, OP posted his question on 2 March, so the spider must be a bit bigger by now ;)
 

BishopiMaster

Arachnobaron
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I assume it is a sling, as he called it 'little one'. Anyway, OP posted his question on 2 March, so the spider must be a bit bigger by now ;)
it is best to verify the actual size of the animal, especially when it's health depends on it, the sooner inverts CAN be kept less humid, the better, less mites, less growth of foreign organisms, etc
 

sasker

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I don't think it is necessary to keep young slings under wet conditions, slightly moist is enough. Couple this with enough ventilation and proper cleaning of boluses and uneaten prey and mites will not be much of a problem. Anyway, juvi and adult Lasiodora spp. benefit from some moist in the enclosure as well rather than keeping the enclosure bone-dry.

On a side-note: I understood that mites are not necessarily as bad as many keepers think. They are only harmful in massive numbers, but that would mean that the keeper has been not paying much attention to the care of his tarantula for quite some time. Predatory mites are quite rare.
 

BishopiMaster

Arachnobaron
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I don't think it is necessary to keep young slings under wet conditions, slightly moist is enough. Couple this with enough ventilation and proper cleaning of boluses and uneaten prey and mites will not be much of a problem. Anyway, juvi and adult Lasiodora spp. benefit from some moist in the enclosure as well rather than keeping the enclosure bone-dry.

On a side-note: I understood that mites are not necessarily as bad as many keepers think. They are only harmful in massive numbers, but that would mean that the keeper has been not paying much attention to the care of his tarantula for quite some time. Predatory mites are quite rare.
I believe the word i used was humid, not "wet", enough ventilation you say? Care to define that? Are we talking cross ventilation? Top? If the setup uses a heat source the temperature differential will create inevitable condensation which will require a lot of cross ventilation to offset, without said temp differential the cross vent may be too much and affect the sling which has not developed its impervious waxy layer via evaporation, also, its not about the mites being predatory persay, any conglomeration of mites can clog the book lungs, affecting the tarantulas respiration, while yes i will agree with you, cleanup is key, but what if the tarantula has a burrow where the bolus is, they move earth, they cover the molding carcass, it happens easily, how will you clean a tiny burrow? There is no reason not to verify the size of t in question
 

sasker

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Yeah, well, it's a Lasiodora we are talking about. So let's not make things more complicated than they are. I think it is safe to say that 'regular sling care' applies in this case and not very specialised care is necessary.

Again, I think a lot of earlier signs must have been ignored if a mite infestation get so out of hand that the poor spider's book lungs are blocked by the litter buggers. Personally I don't feel the need to micro-manage the burrows of my spiders and check for boluses. I mean, these animals can take care of themselves. They have been doing that for a long time.

And yes, you mentioned moist, not wet. But a little bit of moist (either for the sub-adult spider or the sling) will not cause a sudden explosion of mites. I also doubt that cross ventilation will cause a major risk for a sling of drying up to a crisp if the keeper keeps an eye on the humidity of the substrate. I have no idea where you are from, but I can speak from experience that it will take weeks rather than days for a small enclosure to dry up in an arid area like Southern Bulgaria.
 

BishopiMaster

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I dont think its fair to paint verifying the size of the tarantula as making things unnecessarily complicated. Also, i said humid, not moist, not wet, humid, tbe moisture of the substrate will be determined based on the size of the tarantula. I dont see why you are so determined to simplify things to the point of ignorance of his spider, based on tbe fact he called it his little one. Yes, things could have gotten out of hand when you have a mite infestation, but what i said was that the sooner we can keep them less humid, the better, regardless of how frequently the keeper is performing housekeeping. Also, i didnt say to micro manage the burrow, i said HOW would you, meaning i am illustrating that your viewpoint of "just keep things clean" doesnt always pan out, clearly not in your case either. I dont see how the animals can take care of it themselves, i see webbed up boluses all the time which grow fungus fairly quickly, i dont see how the tarantula is to "take care of it" past that point. I am noticing a trend with keepers towards trying to keep things "simple", but when its got to the point that you are vehemently opposing verifying the basic size of the tarantula, i think its gotten out of hand, it takes me all of 2 minutes to perform cleanup for 5 slings every couple days, and 5 to wet the substrate once a week, last i checked, that isnt micro managing.
 

sasker

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I think the OP is no longer interested anyway, so why don't we call it quits. I think we both have similar views but by putting a magnifying glass over each other's words we will continue to find points on which we disagree. And although I like an endless discussion that is not going anywhere as much as the next man, I think we reached a point where it is enough :). To end this discussion on a positive and friendly note: a lot you say makes a lot of sense. There. I said it. :)
 

Venom1080

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16oz deli cup. Like 5-25 holes. Couples inches of peat moss/ eco Earth. Small water dish. Overflow it once a week or so. Small hide. Temps 70+. Feeding once to three or so times a week. Easy peasy
 

BishopiMaster

Arachnobaron
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16oz deli cup. Like 5-25 holes. Couples inches of peat moss/ eco Earth. Small water dish. Overflow it once a week or so. Small hide. Temps 70+. Feeding once to three or so times a week. Easy peasy
I believe the 16oz will cause the thermoregulation of the atmospheric pressure in the living room actuated by the negative pressure zone of the door open to elicit a condition of air abrasion on the waxy epicuticle. I recommend 8 oz.
 

cold blood

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I don't think it is necessary to keep young slings under wet conditions, slightly moist is enough.
No t, regardless of size or species, should ever be kept wet...salamanders, yes, but not ts:happy::wacky:

This is why I always recommend keeping half the sub dry and half damp, by keeping a dry area, it makes it less likely for the new keeper to "over-water" the sub...just the way I see it.
Again, I think a lot of earlier signs must have been ignored if a mite infestation get so out of hand that the poor spider's book lungs are blocked by the litter buggers
Its funny, cause you might think that, but it does happen where its like...BAM, you have a ton of mites. Two springs ago I had this happened I was shocked at how fast it went from 0-everywhere, as I am in the room a lot, often looking with magnified reading glasses...this spring I had another, although minor in comparison to two years ago.

But unlike many who act quickly, I just let things dry out till theyre gone, then slowly add moistutre to the ones that need it most. A healthy spider is way more drought resistant than mites are. Always picking out boli is key, as is ventilation.

sooner we can keep them less humid, the better
Yeah, for a lot of species, that's very true...by 1.5" you can have everything simplified by keeping dry substrate and just a water dish. But there are many species in the hobby now that you just don't want to keep dry for long periods of time...some not even for very short periods of time, like an LV or Theraposa...and then there is the breeding factor.

But certainly, if the species applies, its the best bet for most people....simplify and you will have less issues.
16oz deli cup. Like 5-25 holes. Couples inches of peat moss/ eco Earth. Small water dish. Overflow it once a week or so. Small hide. Temps 70+. Feeding once to three or so times a week. Easy peasy
Exactly, I use these from 1-3".

Under 1" (or 3/4"), I use condiment cups...simple and very effective and easy to monitor....I just keep part of the substrate damp.

I believe the 16oz will cause the thermoregulation of the atmospheric pressure in the living room actuated by the negative pressure zone of the door open to elicit a condition of air abrasion on the waxy epicuticle. I recommend 8 oz.
:rofl:you're killin' me:rofl:
 

Venom1080

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I believe the 16oz will cause the thermoregulation of the atmospheric pressure in the living room actuated by the negative pressure zone of the door open to elicit a condition of air abrasion on the waxy epicuticle. I recommend 8 oz.
joke, right? :rofl:
 

antsman

Arachnosquire
Joined
Oct 3, 2016
Messages
59
I don't think it is necessary to keep young slings under wet conditions, slightly moist is enough. Couple this with enough ventilation and proper cleaning of boluses and uneaten prey and mites will not be much of a problem. Anyway, juvi and adult Lasiodora spp. benefit from some moist in the enclosure as well rather than keeping the enclosure bone-dry.

On a side-note: I understood that mites are not necessarily as bad as many keepers think. They are only harmful in massive numbers, but that would mean that the keeper has been not paying much attention to the care of his tarantula for quite some time. Predatory mites are quite rare.

I use springtails in all my moist enclosures.
 

antsman

Arachnosquire
Joined
Oct 3, 2016
Messages
59
Sorry I ave been super busy lately and haven't had the time to reply.
I have since brushed up on my tarantula knowledge, thanks to Tom and some others.
I now feel comfortable with them, and have the proper knowledge to care for them properly. I see the post went south quick.
And for the record I keep it in the small container my 4" G.porteri came in. Top ventilation, with the small water dish always full. I never soak the substrate just keep in lightly moist. So far growing and eating like a champ and very active.
The springtails are keeping everything clean for me. I have also ordered a Lasiodora parahybana 2.5" female shipping 23rd.

From my experience I found that most people including myself over complicate things, and worry far to much.
The best way to learn is through experience.
 

sasker

Arachnoangel
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Oct 9, 2016
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794
I found that most people including myself over complicate things, and worry far to much.
There is nothing wrong about being worried/concerned about the well-being of your tarantulas. In fact, you wouldn't develop much experience by being careless about their care. But you will find a balance the more experience you gain. For now, I think care-in-a-nutshell that @Venom1080 provided could serve as a good guideline. And remember, there is not one exact way to keep a species (not one exact temperature, one exact humidity level, one exact enclosure size). So don't listen too much to those who try to make you think otherwise ;)

And congratulations with your LP! They are fun creatures. Mine is still only 2" and slightly skittish, but she never kicked hair and she eats like a machine :)
 
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