Just HOW long can an average tarantula go without eating?

Driller64

Arachnosquire
Joined
Aug 17, 2013
Messages
81
The reason I say average is because G. roseas can go two years or more without eating and so can most slow growing species I believe. I want to know how long say, a species like Lasiodora parahybana or Accanthoscuria geniculata can go without eating, like medium to fast growing species like that. I would like to know cause I'm slightly worried about my LP having not eaten for a few months :/
 

Roosterbomb

Arachnopeon
Joined
Feb 18, 2014
Messages
42
From the things I've read it's all over the board. When my first T stopped eating I looked all over for answers and all I could confidently tell you is months lol. I remember reading about a T that refused to eat for 9 months with no apparent harm.

Don't worry about your T make sure the basics are right (temp substrate ect) and it will likely be fine
 

cold blood

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Jan 19, 2014
Messages
12,909
It all depends on the condition of the t as well as the temps at which its kept...its a highly variable question that really has no answer.
 

Blueandbluer

Arachnobaron
Joined
Mar 17, 2015
Messages
495
The reason I say average is because G. roseas can go two years or more without eating and so can most slow growing species I believe. I want to know how long say, a species like Lasiodora parahybana or Accanthoscuria geniculata can go without eating, like medium to fast growing species like that. I would like to know cause I'm slightly worried about my LP having not eaten for a few months :/
Abdomen look ok? Not shrunken or shriveled? If it looks fine, you have nothing to worry about.
 

assidreemz

Arachnosquire
Joined
Sep 10, 2014
Messages
68
As long as your husbandry is correct (temps, water easily accessible, proper sub/hide available) there's really nothing I worry ab.
Actually there's nothing you can really do...
I know it can be stressful when a particular specimen refuses food or fasts but just keep treating and housing the spider correctly and more than likely it will be fine.
Always remember that there is a reason the spider will not eat so remain vigilant.
That being said, I'd say that most NW terrestrials can go for extended periods of time w/o food. Extended being: 6 mos.-1 yr. or possibly even more.
 

gobey

Arachnoknight
Joined
Jun 20, 2014
Messages
290
The reason I say average is because G. roseas can go two years or more without eating and so can most slow growing species I believe. I want to know how long say, a species like Lasiodora parahybana or Accanthoscuria geniculata can go without eating, like medium to fast growing species like that. I would like to know cause I'm slightly worried about my LP having not eaten for a few months :/
Mine has been in pre molt for at least 4 months. And fasting for 2 months now. She's fine.
 

lalberts9310

Arachnoprince
Joined
Oct 9, 2014
Messages
1,090
As long as the abdomen is nice plumb, it's fine.. just make sure it has access to water in form of a water bowl.. they can go a long time without food, depending on the overall condition of the T and husbandry - like already mentioned above
 

MarkmD

Arachnoprince
Joined
Aug 9, 2012
Messages
1,839
I agree with the others, make sure your husbandry is correct, fresh water/sub etc and your T/T's will be fine..I've had many that would fast for 5-8 months at a time and then just started eating again, without molting, plus ones that did molt.
 

Poec54

Arachnoemperor
Joined
Mar 26, 2013
Messages
4,753
The reason I say average is because G. roseas can go two years or more without eating and so can most slow growing species I believe. I want to know how long say, a species like Lasiodora parahybana or Accanthoscuria geniculata can go without eating, like medium to fast growing species like that. I would like to know cause I'm slightly worried about my LP having not eaten for a few months :/
Adult roseas can go a year or two without eating, if they're plump to begin with and have water available throughout. if they're young or recently shed, that's going to be greatly reduced. Temp and humidity are big factors. Too many variables to make a blanket statement. LP's are known to be avid eaters, like all of the big South American terrestrials. Look at your cage & room conditions.
 

gobey

Arachnoknight
Joined
Jun 20, 2014
Messages
290
Adult roseas can go a year or two without eating, if they're plump to begin with and have water available throughout. if they're young or recently shed, that's going to be greatly reduced. Temp and humidity are big factors. Too many variables to make a blanket statement. LP's are known to be avid eaters, like all of the big South American terrestrials. Look at your cage & room conditions.
How about one in pre molt? Mine is taking forever. Has been,fasting for approximately 2 months now. Her sibling molted within a week or two after refusing food. They were on a similar molt schedule.
 

MarkmD

Arachnoprince
Joined
Aug 9, 2012
Messages
1,839
I wouldn't worry about it as G,Rosea are very slow growing species and even as slings/juvies take ages to molt, 4 months in pre-molt and 2 months without food is the norm for them, I'd bet in a couple weeks you will get a molted T or at least in the heavily molting stages.
 

awiec

Arachnoprince
Joined
Feb 13, 2014
Messages
1,329
I'll tell you a little story to make you feel better Driller, my .5 inch G.pulchripes decided to fast for almost 3 months, all I did was provide it with water and it molted with no issue. In Michigan there are many juvinile spiders that will over winter, they slow down their metabolism a bit but still eat a little bit, some will even come out on a sunny day to warm up a little. Lesson is, spiders are very very good at conserving energy and can go months without food as long as they have some water.
 

Poec54

Arachnoemperor
Joined
Mar 26, 2013
Messages
4,753
How about one in pre molt? Mine is taking forever. Has been,fasting for approximately 2 months now. Her sibling molted within a week or two after refusing food. They were on a similar molt schedule.
'Premolt' is defined by what's going on inside a spider's body. We guess when that phase begins and then start pacing. A lot of our guesses are wrong. learn to relax. It's much more stressful for the spider; they may not survive their upcoming molt.
 

gobey

Arachnoknight
Joined
Jun 20, 2014
Messages
290
'Premolt' is defined by what's going on inside a spider's body. We guess when that phase begins and then start pacing. A lot of our guesses are wrong. learn to relax. It's much more stressful for the spider; they may not survive their upcoming molt.
Well she shows physical signs of it rather than just fasting. Her abdomen coloring etc... She's in the process of drinking just about all the water in her dish right now.

Her sac mate and her were on a similar molting schedule. He molted around mid February though. And oddly enough you mention stress and survival as he did die shortly after. :(

I haven't been worrying about her really. And seeing her drinking now makes me feel even better. I want to stay absolutely on top of hydration for her.
 

MarkmD

Arachnoprince
Joined
Aug 9, 2012
Messages
1,839
Yeah she's in pre-molt by the abdomen, but you still have some time maybe a couple more weeks by the look of things, drinking water is a good sign cause it means she's gearing up for the long hall/molting, nice pic by the way :)
 

gobey

Arachnoknight
Joined
Jun 20, 2014
Messages
290
Yeah she's in pre-molt by the abdomen, but you still have some time maybe a couple more weeks by the look of things, drinking water is a good sign cause it means she's gearing up for the long hall/molting, nice pic by the way :)
Lol she's taking her sweet time.

Her brother grew much faster. I was really sad when he passed unexpectedly. He was a goofball. I'm really making sure she's warm and has water. These 2 LPs were my 3rd and 4th tarantulas and I was sooooo excited to get them.

But anyway on topic she's been fussy about food for about 2 months so. Nothing new in tarantula land to have a full T or a T approaching a molt decide it's going to take it easy on food for a bit.
 

MarkmD

Arachnoprince
Joined
Aug 9, 2012
Messages
1,839
Sorry to hear about the one that died, it does happen from time to time, LP's are one of my favourite T's as they get big and mostly stay outside all day, well mine do and hardly use there many hides, I've got pics in my gallery not updated them for some time as this is the first time I've been in for ages lol..I'm sure your T will be fine as your doing everything you can.
 

CBickert

Arachnopeon
Joined
Sep 6, 2013
Messages
47
To me I usually go by appearance rather than time. If the T looks plump and has a full bowl of water I don't feed.
My 3.5" G. pulchripes hasn't eaten since October probably. Still fat as a tick. Temps in the house over the winter have been around 70. Now that it's warming up I'm expecting a molt soon hopefully. Hope this helps. IMO I would be more worried about dangers with over-feeding than under-feeding.
 
Top