just how complicated is it to keep solpugids?

squidkid

Arachnoknight
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where i live a come across a solpugid every once in a while. These arachnids fascinate me but i always steered clear 'cause everyone said that they don't do well in captivity, but recently i seem to be seeing more ppl keeping these things.

my question is: as a casual keeper, could i keep a wc specimen alive? and Is there new information about their care that changes how we see these cool beasts?

also, i know very little about them, can someone who is more experienced fill me in on their behaviors and such?
 

Arthroverts

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I hear they require a winter dormancy in order to survive for long periods of time, and a good, dry soil to burrow into, depending on the species. @Hercules Hernandez and @wizentrop are very knowledgable when it comes to solifuges.

Hope this helps,

Arthroverts
 

NYAN

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I don’t mess with them.

They require a specific consistency of substrate so they can burrow. You also can’t feed them too much or have them in a situation where they are running around a lot.

I think overwintering is a factor also.
 

Hercules Hernandez

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where i live a come across a solpugid every once in a while. These arachnids fascinate me but i always steered clear 'cause everyone said that they don't do well in captivity, but recently i seem to be seeing more ppl keeping these things.

my question is: as a casual keeper, could i keep a wc specimen alive? and Is there new information about their care that changes how we see these cool beasts?

also, i know very little about them, can someone who is more experienced fill me in on their behaviors and such?
Yes! You absolutely can keep them. Many die in captivity due to the spread of false information and novice keepers being misinformed. @NYAN is correct; they need a very compact, topsoil-like mix, a fairly small to medium-sized enclosure, and a winter dormancy period where they can go into brumation, molt, etc. The overwintering period will depend on species and where they come from in my opinion. I wouldn’t try to extend or shorten it by any means. These animals are fairly sensitive, though they are rewarding to keep.
 

Smokehound714

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It depends entirely on the genus and species.

Most require stable sand and clay- particularly eremobatidae

Breeding them is difficult because it requires the male chase the female. The male cannot successfully inseminate the female unless she wants it- she wont open her genital operculum if she's dissatisfied with his conduct. When she decides he's acceptable, she will abruptly stop and let him grab her.

This chase is required- otherwise the female will kill him every time
 

schmiggle

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The male cannot successfully inseminate the female unless she wants it- she wont open her genital operculum if she's dissatisfied with his conduct.
Yet another example of successful feminism in the animal kingdom. But I digress.

I had not heard that the female has to be satisfied with the male, though I've read about the courtship. Do you know if captive females are in the habit of deciding they "just don't like" whatever male you happen to have?
 

Smokehound714

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Yet another example of successful feminism in the animal kingdom. But I digress.

I had not heard that the female has to be satisfied with the male, though I've read about the courtship. Do you know if captive females are in the habit of deciding they "just don't like" whatever male you happen to have?
the chase is required- its foreplay for the female.
 

schmiggle

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the chase is required- its foreplay for the female.
Sure, I understand that. What I meant was, if the male does his laps or whatever, might the female decide she doesn't like him anyway, or is having them in a big tub always enough to convince her he's worth it as long as he's not too injured to run around?
 

Smokehound714

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Sure, I understand that. What I meant was, if the male does his laps or whatever, might the female decide she doesn't like him anyway, or is having them in a big tub always enough to convince her he's worth it as long as he's not too injured to run around?
the best actual bet would be to release the female and follow her as she races around outside in a large unrestricted barren area, then wait til she starts marking with her racket organs.

thats another important issue- she must set down a pheromone trail. if she doesnt, it means shes not ready to mate and might not even be mature.
 

h55d

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So do you have to keep them in a cool place during winter? I'm asking because I'd like one but I live in an apartment and cannot really find a cooler place to simulate winter
 

hecklad

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So do you have to keep them in a cool place during winter? I'm asking because I'd like one but I live in an apartment and cannot really find a cooler place to simulate winter
Disclaimer, I've never kept them so I'm just going off of what I've heard and read.
I don't think it has to be too cold, just down to like the 60s. An ex military guy I know kept an adult in a cooler for 2 years while he was in Iraq. He had cut 2 small holes into the side and ran a tube connecting into it and connected it to a small electric fan. It probably stayed in the low 70s and high 60s.
Also in general I think people exaggerate the difficulty of dealing with fuges, because this guy had literally never kept an animal before, not to mention he used it in fights to bet on and it survived those 2 years as a full grown adult. That said, I would put a little more thought into it than he did but my point remains
 

schmiggle

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Disclaimer, I've never kept them so I'm just going off of what I've heard and read.
I don't think it has to be too cold, just down to like the 60s. An ex military guy I know kept an adult in a cooler for 2 years while he was in Iraq. He had cut 2 small holes into the side and ran a tube connecting into it and connected it to a small electric fan. It probably stayed in the low 70s and high 60s.
Also in general I think people exaggerate the difficulty of dealing with fuges, because this guy had literally never kept an animal before, not to mention he used it in fights to bet on and it survived those 2 years as a full grown adult. That said, I would put a little more thought into it than he did but my point remains
This is quite interesting, but I will say 2 years is not all that long. Of course, who knows how old it was when your friend got it...
 

Arthroverts

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I've got say though that that is on par or better than all the other stories of pets kept by soldiers in wartime @hecklad; not the betting and fighting part, but keeping it alive in wartime!

Thanks,

Arthroverts
 

hecklad

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This is quite interesting, but I will say 2 years is not all that long. Of course, who knows how old it was when your friend got it...
Considering how large it was, with close to probably a 10 inch leg span, I'm fairly certain it was full grown when he got it (or it was a juvenile very close to adulthood). I also haven't heard from or seen him in years so I don't remember if it died or if he let it go before coming back
 

mantisfan101

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Interesting, I have 1 galeodes granti female and 2 paragaleodes pallidus females and I just deicded to move the galeodes to 32 oz deli cup with a little bit of reptisoil at the bottom. She seems much calmer compared to when I kept her in the medium kritter keeper. The @ paragaleodes also seem to be doing ok but they sealed themselves off in a hole that they dug, and haven't done much. Also, has anyone ever tried toggling with humidity? I'm keeping mine in slightly damp substrate and as of rigjht now they seem to be doing fine, although they seem much slower/sluggish than usual, but this may very well be a good thing.
 
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