It seems to me, that for newbs, temperment is more important than venom potency.

jebbewocky

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People always reccomend T's with low venom potency(but likely to kick hairs).
It's not like being experience makes you immune to venom, just better able to avoid a bite. If a T has bad venom, but is unlikely to bite (I can't think of any either rofl), it seems like that would still make a good starter.

discussion? Agree? Disagree?
 

belljar77

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I know when I first started, I was terrified of Pokies. I thought I'd take it easy with Brachys and the like. Now though, I've learned to be just as careful around my boehmei and smithi as I am around my big pedserseni- nasty, jumpy hair-kickers! And the only one to ever try and take a walk on me was an Avic. So, yeah, I'd consider temperment before venom, now.
 

Pociemon

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I would definately say poecilotheria metalicca and subfusca are in that category, neither is likely to bite, unless provoked. I have 14 p metalicca and 16 subfusca, and in all sizes. Never seen any kind of defensive behaviour from them. But the do have the same venom as every other poecilotheria, so i would maybe not call them T´s for beginners.

But there is all kind of T´s with different venom potency and temperament out there, it is just to pick the right one;)
 

Sleazoid

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I think it is for usually for people who care about handling. I do not handle and I think my B. vagans is more fearsome than any of my Old worlders.
 

malevolentrobot

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I think it is for usually for people who care about handling. I do not handle and I think my B. vagans is more fearsome than any of my Old worlders.
exactly, i think its a reassurance we give ourselves, especially starting out fearing that first bite (if it ever happens). "well at least if x gets out and bites me, it wont hurt nearly as much as y, as proven by the bite reports given thusfar."

personally, i get Ts trying to hair me way more often than actual threats, but such is the risk with half of the collection being brachys, lol. also, man do some of us have some pissy vagans, myself included.
 

gvfarns

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Pretty much venom potency and temperament go hand in hand. The tarantulas least likely to bite also have the most benign venom.

Newbies typically want a tarantula that's not scary or dangerous, so they can tell themselves and others that it won't bite and even if it does it's not going to be bad. Both are about equally important psycologically. The reality is that temperament is more important, but for a new tarantula owner, the big danger is the owner freaking out and behaving inappropriately, not the tarantula.
 

BenjaminBoa

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Also newbies might not know how to safely transfer, move, clean the cages and such putting them at more a risk of getting bit (though low regardless) than some of the more experienced keepers. Also all it takes is one bad bite to scare a person off from keeping T's, I think a very docile AND low venom potency tarantula is best for starters.

---------- Post added 12-27-2011 at 04:34 PM ----------

Pretty much venom potency and temperament go hand in hand. The tarantulas least likely to bite also have the most benign venom.

Newbies typically want a tarantula that's not scary or dangerous, so they can tell themselves and others that it won't bite and even if it does it's not going to be bad. Both are about equally important psycologically. The reality is that temperament is more important, but for a new tarantula owner, the big danger is the owner freaking out and behaving inappropriately, not the tarantula.
Ooops didn't see this XD exactly!
 

KidKat8807

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Jan 17, 2011
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I started my collection by rescuing a cobalt blue from a pet store. They pretty much told me it was the devil and that I would lose a limb if it bit me but that didn't stop me. I've never kept tarantulas before that, nor have I ever taken much interest due to my arachnophobia, but I still thought that the way they were keeping it and treating it at the store was wrong; I could smell the dead crickets decaying in the tiny enclosure. And after the staff refused to "bag" it for me and I had to do it myself by manipulating it to move with a pair of tongs into one of those cardboard animal boxes, I found I wasn't least bit afraid. I was never dumb enough to try and pet it and always took care when it came down to relocating it or cleaning out the enclosure, so that leads me to believe that many people that are just staring out or are thinking about getting a tarantula should be able to choose freely regardless of venom potency or aggression. I mean, as long as this person(in a perfect world only, alas) is a responsible animal owner, it shouldn't matter what tarantula he/she chooses. That's just my 2 cents though. I personally chose all my t's for many characteristics like color/pattern, size, ease of care and feeding,and most importantly lack of uricating hairs. Just so happened that I ended up with a whole bunch of some of the meanest spiders out there from my pokies, to my baboons, and my earth tiger.
 

Tiffany

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Having been bitten by all manner of creatures, I like pets that are gentle and if they do bite it won't be too painful. I think one problem (with any pet owner of any animal) is that they make a bite out to be worse than it is, but add venom to that and it's just that much worse. First impressions are hard to shake, so if you start out with something gentle, and later get bit by something more aggressive you still have a good experience with a spider that doesn't make the aggressive one seem "bad". Personally I would never own any aggressive animal no matter how "experienced" I am. But I like pets I can interact with. ^_^
 

Anonymity82

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Having been bitten by all manner of creatures, I like pets that are gentle and if they do bite it won't be too painful. I think one problem (with any pet owner of any animal) is that they make a bite out to be worse than it is, but add venom to that and it's just that much worse. First impressions are hard to shake, so if you start out with something gentle, and later get bit by something more aggressive you still have a good experience with a spider that doesn't make the aggressive one seem "bad". Personally I would never own any aggressive animal no matter how "experienced" I am. But I like pets I can interact with. ^_^
I think potentially dangerous (not deadly) pets are exciting to be around, exciting to care for and just good for character and discipline. Also, they can probably increase your ability to act instantly to a situation. Almost like training!!
I don't think it's a great idea to start with a dangerous species, but if you do tons (and I mean tons) of research and really want a Pokie or some other potentially dangerous pet, then go for it!! Just do the research and communicate with experienced owners through forums or if you're lucky enough someone you know!
 

unclechewy

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I think an important factor to consider as well is speed. Are you equipped to handle a P. Cambridgei that bolts out of the enclosure and up your arm and onto your back before you have time to blink. (This happend to me last night while rehousing a 1 1/2" sling. With the help of my son, we got it safely into its new home.) If you plan to handle your T's a slower docile species is a much better choice. Although this does not insure you won't get bit. The only bite I have encurred was from a very docile G. Pulchripes that I had handled many times before. For some reason on that day she was in a bad mood. Make sure whatever T you decide on, you are comfortable with the requirements of keeping that species.
 

Anonymity82

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I think an important factor to consider as well is speed. Are you equipped to handle a P. Cambridgei that bolts out of the enclosure and up your arm and onto your back before you have time to blink. (This happend to me last night while rehousing a 1 1/2" sling. With the help of my son, we got it safely into its new home.) If you plan to handle your T's a slower docile species is a much better choice. Although this does not insure you won't get bit. The only bite I have encurred was from a very docile G. Pulchripes that I had handled many times before. For some reason on that day she was in a bad mood. Make sure whatever T you decide on, you are comfortable with the requirements of keeping that species.
I was a little lax with my OBT sling (~1") because it didn't move much in the container. I opened up the container at 2am (not in a secure area) and the next thing I knew I was in the bath tub carefully taking off all my closed with my sleepy eyed fiance telling me where it was on my body!!

So yes, speed is a definite factor I wasn't even thinking about. Don't forget that you're arboreal or semi arboreal T's can and will climb UP. Close air vents when working with them too!
 

19tarantula91

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I think venom is always a more important factor. Every T even a docile T has the potential to bite. Whenever some one asks me about getting into the hobby I always suggest a less potent T. In a perfect world a docile and less potent T like maybe a pink toe is best. Of course not every avic is docile but in my experince most are.
 

Kungfujoe

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I will have to agree with thomas and bell, P. metallicas arent that bad. I got mine about a month ago and he/she is pretty chill as far as agression. But their speed is pretty crazy, much faster then my A. minitrix. Then again, when they get a certain size they tend to slow down, well thats what i hear any way.
 

Tiffany

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Dec 25, 2011
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I think potentially dangerous (not deadly) pets are exciting to be around, exciting to care for and just good for character and discipline. Also, they can probably increase your ability to act instantly to a situation. Almost like training!!
I don't think it's a great idea to start with a dangerous species, but if you do tons (and I mean tons) of research and really want a Pokie or some other potentially dangerous pet, then go for it!! Just do the research and communicate with experienced owners through forums or if you're lucky enough someone you know!
Heh... Yeah, I have a rabbit that turned into a little fuzz ball from hell when she hit puberty. This rabbit would make guttural grunting sounds and try to attack me whenever I tried to feed her or change her cage. I cannot say I was particularly thrilled with having to react quicker than my rabbit could dart (not an easy task, and my hands and arms reflected that). Luckily a "fix" from the vet put her back to her sweet self, but I can't say I enjoyed having an aggressive pet. ^_^;;

However, I can see how other people would like them. :D I'm just not into animals I can only observe, I like ones I can hold and interact with.
 

Anonymity82

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Heh... Yeah, I have a rabbit that turned into a little fuzz ball from hell when she hit puberty. This rabbit would make guttural grunting sounds and try to attack me whenever I tried to feed her or change her cage. I cannot say I was particularly thrilled with having to react quicker than my rabbit could dart (not an easy task, and my hands and arms reflected that). Luckily a "fix" from the vet put her back to her sweet self, but I can't say I enjoyed having an aggressive pet. ^_^;;

However, I can see how other people would like them. :D I'm just not into animals I can only observe, I like ones I can hold and interact with.
I like a mixture of the two. We have two dogs and volunteer once a week at a cat foster home (that's enough cat for me). For the past 6 years I've had hamsters and every year and a half later they would die. This depressed the hell out of me and after my last hamster died I decided to get something that would live longer and depress me less so I got into arachnids. I have a hamster again but it's more for my fiance plus it's a Robo and they are less personable than their larger cousins. They are also known for their longevity compared to their cousins (2-4 years). I can't really handle it and it only just started letting me pet it. It has literally lunged through the air like 4 inches or more to bite me while I was pulling out some dirty TP. Sometimes I can pet him, sometimes he tries to bite me but he's been less aggressive since I stopped hand feeding him treats.

Ferrets were my all time favorite. I had four of them and they were wonderful together. They stink real bad though, but they are a mixture between dogs, cats and rodents. They were my all time favorite pets. You have to keep more than one though or else they can become aggressive.
 

kaitala

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Nov 22, 2011
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Noob here, and I started with a .75" H. lividum sling about 2 months ago. I've never had an urge to handle the t's, even the nicest of nice low-venom, low-aggression, low-defensiveness, low-anything t's. To me, they're all like dry fish tanks, cool pets to watch, but you don't hold them.

I'm so extremely fortunate to have a very experienced keeper within 5 miles, who has shared his hands-off handling techniques, and continues to make himself available for advice. I try to be super cautious, even only opening my lividum's enclosure while in the confines of a larger tank.

And you all were right, they're super-addictive.... I have a rosy, a pink toe, and some mexican redrumps on order. :) I don't anticipate holding them and petting them either, but I'm anxious to see all the differences.

I don't think any species should be off-putting for the respectful beginner, willing to research and willing to listen and take advice from experienced keepers.
 

BenjaminBoa

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See the problem isn't just the person, honestly if someone who's never even touched a spider, much less a tarantula wants to go and get themselves a pokie or a haplo thats not a huge issue... if they get bit who gives a shit it's their own fault for lack of experience and they're probably not gonna die. The real issue is other people, someone who isn't experienced with these guys is likely to mess up and get an escape. A good bite from some oldworlds from my understanding can kill most dogs and cats, possibly young children or people with sever allergies to venom. Now if this newb loses this tarantula and it bites someone, or even if it doesn't he's putting others at risk. If he lives in an appartment or dorm that isn't fair to the countless others living in that building that the newb bought a p. metallica because it looked awesome and now Jane four doors down is having a panic attack from being attacked by a giant blue spider along with an agonizing 3 weeks of cramps. An experienced keeper has methods and understanding that they don't even realize when it comes to dealing with spiders so an escapee is not as likely to occur, if it does that person will know exactly what to do and how to instruct others if they find it.

You don't realize there is technique shoving a cup over a tarantula haha, I didn't realize you get this second nature ability to predict movement and better capture them till I was at petsmart and I had brought a little deli cup with my versi sling with me to compare his body size to a few betta bowl containers on sale. My friend who knows a lot about T's (mainly from me and research) but has never had one herself opens it up while I look at the tanks, and accidently breathes on the Versi....

Writer (my versi's name) jumps out, runs down her leg onto the floor. I hear some commotion and turn around and see my little blue versi running around and my friend and two idiots from the store backing people up and desperately trying to capture it in cups.. and failing miserable. Pissed as I was I shove them away and in one motion catch and contain the versi and scold my friend for opening it. Knowledge about a species or tarantulas as a whole does not = experience.

I've only had 5 tarantulas but I've had many other creatures who are escape artists or "unpredictable"
So if a noob is, not only willing to accept that he has a potentially dangerous species in his home, but also make sure others around him accept that fact, then I have no problem with it. But they also gotta accept that their ability to react wont be as quick and refined as more experienced people.
 
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