Is the tarantula hobby shinking, growing, or staying the same?

CEOAirsoft

Arachnopeon
Joined
Aug 17, 2016
Messages
8
I was searching to answer this question but couldn't find anything. Is anybody in the T business that can provide some impute.
 

Vanessa

Grammostola Groupie
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Mar 12, 2016
Messages
2,374
Probably growing, but I'm not sure in a good way. PetCo selling them is going to make the hobby grow, and some of those people will become passionate and good hobbyists, but most of them won't.
The thrill seeking on social media platforms have made it grow, but again not really in a good way.
Then there are the minority who get it for what it really is and have the love and respect that the hobby needs. Personally, I see those as being a very small number.
When you weed out all the novelty chasers and thrill seekers - my guess is that it is more staying the same than growing.
 

magicmed

Arachnobaron
Joined
Jun 4, 2016
Messages
403
World domination. That is the end goal of every T keeper, it's a part of the code of....


Nvm, I've said too much already.

PBUH
 

Bread

Arachnopeon
Joined
May 11, 2016
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26
hobbyist can mean anything really, what do you actually call tarantula owners?
 

chanda

Arachnoking
Old Timer
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Jun 27, 2010
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2,059
we are growing at a rate of 1/2 a hobbyist a day.
Is that calculation based on the number of people who acquire their first tarantulas on a given day, adjusted for the number of "experienced" keepers who are killed and eaten by their pets? :rolleyes:
 

Poec54

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Mar 26, 2013
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4,763
It's a transient hobby for many people, so there's always some beginning the hobby, and some dropping out. Prices in the US have been gradually coming down from the highs of the mid 2000's when demand greatly exceeded supply. As more people have been importing from Europe, becoming dealers, & breeding themselves the supply is starting to catch up. Most prices here are still much higher than Europe, where tarantulas are more plentiful. For a long time the European model has been low unit prices and high quantities sold, which allowed more people to get into the hobby, and it's huge over there. 10 years ago in the US it was the opposite (high unit prices put the hobby out of reach for most people that might be interested). As we slowly transition to European prices, we're seeing more people join the hobby in the US. Most reptile/animal people aren't going to spend $50 to 100+ for a 1/2 sling.

BTW, 20 years ago, the hobby in the US was mostly wild-caught adults, which limited the species available, as few could be caught and exported in any kind of regularity from remote areas. However, Europeans traveled and collected in small quantities, and started breeding them, as it was too expensive to keep traveling every time they needed more spiders. As they had surplus, they exported some their CBB slings to other countries in the 1990's, and by the mid 2000's a tidal wave of new tropical species hit the US, and the hobby exploded here. People were able to buy many dozens of species they never knew existed. Since supplies were very limited, prices were accordingly high. We'll see more people in the hobby as prices continue to moderate.
 

CEOAirsoft

Arachnopeon
Joined
Aug 17, 2016
Messages
8
It's a transient hobby for many people, so there's always some beginning the hobby, and some dropping out. Prices in the US have been gradually coming down from the highs of the mid 2000's when demand greatly exceeded supply. As more people have been importing from Europe, becoming dealers, & breeding themselves the supply is starting to catch up. Most prices here are still much higher than Europe, where tarantulas are more plentiful. For a long time the European model has been low unit prices and high quantities sold, which allowed more people to get into the hobby, and it's huge over there. 10 years ago in the US it was the opposite (high unit prices put the hobby out of reach for most people that might be interested). As we slowly transition to European prices, we're seeing more people join the hobby in the US. Most reptile/animal people aren't going to spend $50 to 100+ for a 1/2 sling.

BTW, 20 years ago, the hobby in the US was mostly wild-caught adults, which limited the species available, as few could be caught and exported in any kind of regularity from remote areas. However, Europeans traveled and collected in small quantities, and started breeding them, as it was too expensive to keep traveling every time they needed more spiders. As they had surplus, they exported some their CBB slings to other countries in the 1990's, and by the mid 2000's a tidal wave of new tropical species hit the US, and the hobby exploded here. People were able to buy many dozens of species they never knew existed. Since supplies were very limited, prices were accordingly high. We'll see more people in the hobby as prices continue to moderate.
Thanks a lot for the great information.
 

Poec54

Arachnoemperor
Joined
Mar 26, 2013
Messages
4,763
Expanding. :)

Casey: Couldn't find your earlier post; sorry to hear of your circumstances. If it works out at some point in the future for you to collect tarantulas again, let me know and I'll send you some. We're always needing good people in the hobby.
 
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