Is a Psalmopoeus irminia a good first arboreal tarantula?

Aqual

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I want to get an arboreal but I don't know which ones are good for beginners since I have never had an arboreal tarantula before
 

Chris LXXIX

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I wouldn't suggest a P.irminia as first arboreal... they tend to be defensive. I've saw (believe me or not) P.irminia with more attitude than certain 'Pokies'.
Plus they love to hide. This is not a 'Cons' for me but.

Psalmopoeus cambridgei is the perfect arboreal for start: easy to care, hardy, not (IMO) defensive at all, keeper errors-forgiving, females reach a nice size...
 

Venom1080

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expect speed and defensiveness. but are fast growing and beautiful. some people almost never see theres, but i see my two daily.
 

KezyGLA

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IME langenbucheri is out more than any other arboreal I have kept. I would recommend it as it isnt defensive and only grows 4inches max :)
 

Ungoliant

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I want to get an arboreal but I don't know which ones are good for beginners since I have never had an arboreal tarantula before
If you want something a little slower than a Psalmopoeus, you can get an Avicularia (2" or larger, no slings for your first). Just be sure to follow the instructions here, as Avics are less tolerant of newbie errors. (Ideally, post pictures of your setup to get feedback before you add the spider.)
 

edesign

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No, Psalmos are not introductory arboreals. Can you manage one? Maybe, maybe not. Start with an Avic and learn how arboreals behave and move first. I would avoid diversipes though, all three of my slings are skittish and fast for an Avic. Others have noticed this as well.

I never see my irminia, all two weeks I've had her lol, but I've read a lot about them and the general consensus is most are more secretive than your average Psalmo. And defensive. I will say I had more trouble getting mine out of its shipping tube than any other spider I own and any other rehousing I've done (60+, 20+ genera, OW and NW, including a recently rehoused 6" P. ornata), it was striking at my tools and refused to budge. I actually wound up leaving it in a bigger tank to let it come out on its own which was a first for me. Their venom is also stronger than your typical NW. Combine that with their speed and the potential is there for a bad time especially for a new arboreal keeper.

Do you have any OW experience or just terrestrial NW? But, again, terrestrials will obviously behave and move differently than an arboreal. A small sling may be ok provided you give yourself room to catch it if it takes off but it could also easily surprise you and wind up giving you a kiss ;) That's why I suggest an Avic, get used to the movements as arboreals are much more prone to run in three dimensions than a terrestrial, adds an extra degree of difficulty sometimes.

Try a versicolor, keep it well ventilated, and you'll love it as a first arboreal. They can be a bit skittish and will jump (as will Psalmos), prey aggression is high ime, and they web like crazy. Mine seem to be relaxing as they become juvies.

And Avic slings really aren't that hard to raise. Ventilation is the key and not keeping them too humid. Stagnant air will kill them. Don't be afraid of air holes.
 

edesign

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I've also read about plenty of defensive cambridgei, my 4" cambridgei has given me threat displays numerous times. Pretty sure it tried to tag me once at half that size. Rehousing went smooth but it certainly let me know it was not happy being removed from its home. I wouldn't consider them the perfect starter arboreal. I'd recommend an I. hirsutum before a Psalmo. Pretty fast when they want, can be defensive even as small juvies (regular threat displays from my pair even at <2"), minus the stronger venom.
 

14pokies

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they tend to be defensive. I've saw (believe me or not) P.irminia with more attitude than certain 'Pokies'.
I've never seen any species of pokie that is as defensive as a P.irminia once you start disturbing it for transferring etc..
 

boina

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For all those people recommending Avics: My A. huriana is the most skittish T I own, given to racing, even jumping, around it's enclosure even at small disturbances. I've already had two near escapes and I've only had it a month. All my Psalmos are easier to deal with, even my irminia. I'd still go with the cambridgei, though, they are generally the most relaxed Psalmos.

IME langenbucheri is out more than any other arboreal I have kept. I would recommend it as it isnt defensive and only grows 4inches max :)
Where can I get one in Europe??
 

KezyGLA

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For all those people recommending Avics: My A. huriana is the most skittish T I own, given to racing, even jumping, around it's enclosure even at small disturbances. I've already had two near escapes and I've only had it a month. All my Psalmos are easier to deal with, even my irminia. I'd still go with the cambridgei, though, they are generally the most relaxed Psalmos.



Where can I get one in Europe??
There have been a few breedings very recently in your country :)

Check facebook page 'Faszination vogelspinne' or the classifieds websites ;)
 

edesign

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For all those people recommending Avics: My A. huriana is the most skittish T I own, given to racing, even jumping, around it's enclosure even at small disturbances. I've already had two near escapes and I've only had it a month.
They're still not as fast as a Psalmo. Nothing wrong with skittish, the issue is the speed difference (most Avics, I did say avoid diversipes lol, I had a full grown huriana many years ago, had no issues with it but I never gave it a chance to run) and venom strength.

OP hasn't said what Ts they have and for how long. An escaped Avic is really no big deal. An escaped Psalmo otoh, while not an OW, is worth being a bit concerned about especially an adult.

My four ecclesiasticus slings were jumpy when I first rehoused them but easily manageable. Time will tell how they are when bigger :) Individuals vary too, we all know that.

I just can't imagine an Avic being so fast and flighty that it could actually escape from me. Run out of its tank, sure, np, but cover enough ground fast enough that I can't catch it? Maybe the diversipes when they get bigger but I'm not convinced they're actually Avics. They act more like Iridopelma imho and, while coloration means little when it comes to classification, the abdominal patterns when young are very similar. I'm not a taxonomist though :p
 

Goodlukwitthat

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I wouldn't suggest a P.irminia as first arboreal... they tend to be defensive. I've saw (believe me or not) P.irminia with more attitude than certain 'Pokies'.
Plus they love to hide. This is not a 'Cons' for me but.

Psalmopoeus cambridgei is the perfect arboreal for start: easy to care, hardy, not (IMO) defensive at all, keeper errors-forgiving, females reach a nice size...

Aww my 3 P. irminias are calm and haven't much care in the world :D Although they are my 2nd arboreal tarantula lol. Prior to them I have an A. Avic...I guess I really messed up on those "stepping stones" haha.
 

Nightstalker47

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Psalmopoeus can be flighty and defensive. If you had to choose one I'd go with P.cambridgei , they are fast growing, voracious eaters and are hardier then irminia, as far as humidity goes anyway. Plus cambridgei get bigger and grow faster IME, I have 3 P. Irminia and I only see them out at night. My adult cambridgei females come out of their dens to greet me sometimes, love feeding them cause they don't spook as easy as irminia.
 

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Chris LXXIX

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Let me explain why I don't consider genus Avicularia (hoping that the name wouldn't change in the meantime :troll:) as a good beginner arboreal Theraphosidae.

Yeah they aren't defensive at all (not the way I consider/view as 'defensive' a Theraphosidae, at least) and, while speedy (doesn't exists slow arboreals, one moment) their speed is less 'nervous' than a P.cambridgei one. But they aren't the best for everyone.

We know how to care about those, even if I'm not an 'avic' fan at all. But not everyone. They are not, even if someone is in good faith, "mistake-forgiving" user friendly. Think about how many, but how many threads you have read about 'avics & issues' so far, and how many for a P.cambridgei?

The right ventilation, so basically air "quality", is really essence when it comes to those.

'avics' are an amazing striking colors genus that IMO belongs to a separate league... pure aesthetic T's, just like a (rich) man that collects vintage class A cars of once. And, in fact, even here where T's are supposed to cost less, certain 'avics' females are prized. Why I'm saying this?

Because 'avics' IMO teach basically nothing important to someone interested into a real arboreal challenge that, one day, will lead to S.calceatum and such (assuming there's again folks out there that still loves the old good 'step by step', 'ladder' way, uh).

P.cambridgei are the milestone: they possess all the perfect features for such a goal. I do know that their venom is nasty and a bit "powerful" for being NW, but it's simple: avoid bites.

Their level of defensiveness is highly overexaggerated. I see no reasons for not suggest to a serious keeper interested into an arboreal path challenge those.
 
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