Introducing Xenesthis sp. megaseta

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Arachnobaron
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As a Pamphobeteus/Xenesthis/Theraphosa fanatic this is incredibly exciting - the pictures below are from the first successful breeding of this new species out of Germany. I’m posting these pictures with the breeders permission (buying the entire sac probably helped there lol).

What’s so special about this species? It’s pretty simple - they are the largest member of the genus currently known. This is a legitimately Goliath-sized beast with gorgeous Xenesthis coloration. They appear to be most similar to intermedia, and also share similarities with sp. megascopula.

This is a tropical Xenesthis species that do well with higher temps opposed to some of the higher altitude species. They hail from Columbia but are within two hours of the Venezuelan border.

I’ll post pics of the slings when they’re here - very excited!
 

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WolleWolf

Arachnopeon
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I need a Xenesthia spec in my Collection, now I know which one it is!!! Beautyful Monster! Love it! Hope prices will not be insane
 

Exoskeleton Invertebrates

Arachnoprince
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Another Xenesthis from different locality, with a high price tag, that could well be a species that has been stablished in the hobby for years lol. I’ll stick with Xenesthis immanis that is dirt cheap hehe.
 

Smotzer

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Id be hesitant to label that as that it is an actual separate and distict species from anything, people love to just make up their own ideas about what is a different species. Xenethis and Pamphobetus are the absolute worst with this recently, with so many undescribed spp. entering the hobby, with fanciful price tags, they could literally be anything, or the same as something else they dont look all that distinct. Sure you dropped quite a penny on a sac, especially if they were already all hatched. But we shall see in time about what you have! Good luck on the slings though!!
 

Jess S

Arachnobaron
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Wow. I'm literally speechless at the moment. Very gorgeous and the female looks like a proper heavyweight lol
 

Comatose

Arachnobaron
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Id be hesitant to label that as that it is an actual separate and distict species from anything, people love to just make up their own ideas about what is a different species. Xenethis and Pamphobetus are the absolute worst with this recently, with so many undescribed spp. entering the hobby, with fanciful price tags, they could literally be anything, or the same as something else they dont look all that distinct. Sure you dropped quite a penny on a sac, especially if they were already all hatched. But we shall see in time about what you have! Good luck on the slings though!!
I’m confident in the breeder. It’s also ludicrous to suggest they could be “literally anything”... we can probably narrow it down a bit, no?

I think whether it’s a novel species or not is up in the air, particularly with a genus like Xenesthis, but this is at the very least a unique variant with distinguishing physiological characteristics.

To each their own of course; I’m very excited for these myself, thought.

I need a Xenesthia spec in my Collection, now I know which one it is!!! Beautyful Monster! Love it! Hope prices will not be insane
If it’s your first grab an X intermedia. They’re around at reasonable prices (I’m not selling any so this isn’t a plug) and it’s an absolutely amazing species.
 

basin79

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Another Xenesthis from different locality, with a high price tag, that could well be a species that has been stablished in the hobby for years lol. I’ll stick with Xenesthis immanis that is dirt cheap hehe.
X. immanis are absolute stunners too. You can't go wrong with any (as you know).
 

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Arachnobaron
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X. immanis are absolute stunners too. You can't go wrong with any (as you know).
I do love them as well. There does seem to be a lot more regional variation in immanis; my partner has a bunch that all have minor variations.
 

basin79

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I do love them as well. There does seem to be a lot more regional variation in immanis; my partner has a bunch that all have minor variations.
To be honest the only thing I really know about them is they're stunning like the other members.
 

WolleWolf

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If it’s your first grab an X intermedia. They’re around at reasonable prices (I’m not selling any so this isn’t a plug) and it’s an absolutely amazing species.
I had a Xenesthis immanis female 15 years ago, but I had to sell her at this Time. I have been eyeing quite a while for a X. intermedia, but if this Xenesthis will going to be the biggest species so far, this will be the most wanted for me!
 

su3cl3a8

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I do love them as well. There does seem to be a lot more regional variation in immanis; my partner has a bunch that all have minor variations.
I'm under the impression that Xenesthis cf immanis has two variants, which are the "short hair" and the "long hair" variants? I believe these two come from two different locales. Are there any other regional variations?
 

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Arachnobaron
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I'm under the impression that Xenesthis cf immanis has two variants, which are the "short hair" and the "long hair" variants? I believe these two come from two different locales. Are there any other regional variations?
I’ve been told that those are the only two taxonomically significant variants, but that there are dozens of regional variants. Sp. “backfire” comes to mind.

This is probably one of the reasons for confusion among hobbyists - regional variants and likely novel species are often given informal names that don’t denote what merits a unique identifier. For example most Peruvian “Pamphobeteus sp. locality” are regional variants of Peruvian antinous.

For this reason I generally only take and use informal species or variant titles from people with deep knowledge of the genus and regions in question. With megaseta, I’m satisfied that it’s a unique animal, and not simply a regional variation of one we already know.
 

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Arachnobaron
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hi, could you explain what does it mean in detail?
They have large scopula (similar to sp. megascopula) and huge setae on the metatarsus of legs III and IV. The coloration and overall appearance is similar to intermedia.
 

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Arachnobaron
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hi, how are these "huge setae / megasetae" defined? Is there something special opposite to other species?
I can only go by what a person who handles literally tens of thousands of Xenesthis tells me. But yes, this seems to be a defining characteristic of this animal.
 

c.h.esteban

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...But yes, this seems to be a defining characteristic of this animal.

if i have a look at the metatarsus 3 and 4 of some sp. MEGASCOLULA and others X. sp. too, i can see there also bigger setae.
so if these megasetae are a such a important feature, there should be a good explanation of the difference.
 

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Arachnobaron
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if i have a look at the metatarsus 3 and 4 of some sp. MEGASCOLULA and others X. sp. too, i can see there also bigger setae.
so if these megasetae are a such a important feature, there should be a good explanation of the difference.
I'm going by what the person who discovered and introduced them (as well as sp. megascopula and dozens of other South American giants, including Pamphobeteus sp. Solaris) told me. More details will be forthcoming I'm sure, but for the time being I trust what I have. If you don't that's certainly your prerogative. Cheers!
 

Exoskeleton Invertebrates

Arachnoprince
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I'm going by what the person who discovered and introduced them (as well as sp. megascopula and dozens of other South American giants, including Pamphobeteus sp. Solaris) told me. More details will be forthcoming I'm sure, but for the time being I trust what I have. If you don't that's certainly your prerogative. Cheers!
I’m thinking you meant who “smuggled” the pregnant adults and eventually introduced the babies to the hobby 😉.
 

Smotzer

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I’m thinking you meant who “smuggled” the pregnant adults and eventually introduced the babies to the hobby 😉.
Are you playing? cause ive been seeing these Xenethis spp. pop up with some not being able to say what import they came from. So..... whats that say?
 
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