Interesting Assumption

opticle

Arachnoknight
Old Timer
Joined
Dec 23, 2007
Messages
170
gday guys,

just wanted to bring up a few interesting similarities i've noticed between 2 sp.
A recently discovered species over in Australia (named Satin Red for now) bares some striking similarities to those of the P. murinus, colour, size, both old world T's and even the carapace markings to some extent they both have in common, even geographic locations are very similar.

My theory is that long long long ago when the Earth's land was a lot closer together then it is now, these species could of prehaps been very closely related occupying the African regions and migrating to Australia before evolution.

anyway, here are some pics of both sp. so you know what i'm talking about :D

Satin Red

http://i142.photobucket.com/albums/r118/dtasrt_lk/4efc29e5.jpg

P. murinus

http://www.swiftinverts.com/pix/P.murinus1.jpg


Earth's evolution


http://geology.com/pangea-continental-drift.gif

Cheers
 

Julia

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
Joined
Jan 17, 2009
Messages
433
Wow! Is that the first non-brown tarantula discovered in Australia?? :)

Anyway, there has been some talk about this when discussing the P. irminia. It's a new-world tarantula that displays many of the same traits and behaviors of the old-world arboreal tarantulas.
 

syndicate

Arachnoemperor
Old Timer
Joined
Aug 26, 2005
Messages
4,511
Wow! Is that the first non-brown tarantula discovered in Australia?? :)
haha hey that's not very nice lol!Not all the Aussie t's are a brown color ;]
Very cool spider tho opticle!I don't think it has much to do with P.murinus but def a nice find!Any idea what genus is belongs to?
-Chris
 

opticle

Arachnoknight
Old Timer
Joined
Dec 23, 2007
Messages
170
Yes mate will be grouped with the Phlogius genus for now (not sure if its to change)

cheers
 

jbm150

Arachnoprince
Old Timer
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Mar 18, 2009
Messages
1,651
Beautiful T! How big do they get, if you know? If they get big, I gotsta have :D

To the original assumption, they don't appear to share much in common physically with obts beyond the color. And there could be numerous reasons for that. The substrate that they typically are found in might be reddish in color, like red clay. To me, they just look like a typical Aussie T, albeit red.
 

opticle

Arachnoknight
Old Timer
Joined
Dec 23, 2007
Messages
170
Hi Chris,

sorry mate i should have worded that a little better, both locations have more of the same environments (dryland, temperature).

Hi jbm150,

If they are anything like the other phlogius species then average size will be 7.5-8.5 inches, being only recently discovered we will still have to wait and see!

cheers,
 

Travis K

TravIsGinger
Old Timer
Joined
Jan 6, 2007
Messages
2,527
Some how I am not really seeing the similarities other than color. It is a tarantula but that is about it.
 

karmeleon

Arachnosquire
Old Timer
Joined
Nov 20, 2004
Messages
71
I think your theory is off track. I think this is a case of parellel evolotion where similar environmental conditions have resulted in similar evolutionary traits in otherwise unrelated organisms. For example look up Emerald Tree boas and green tree pythons.
 

jt39565

Arachnoknight
Joined
Aug 28, 2010
Messages
179
Interesting theory, I will stick with the parallel evolution theory myself.
 
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