Induce minimal webbing in greenbottle blue?

kevinlowl

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Is there anyway to do so? Like for example providing a certain level of substrate or a certain enclosure height to make them put down minimal webbing. I've seen enclosures where there is just the perfect amount of webbing to make a nice looking environment and others where there is literally nothing but webbing, which look unappealing imo.

I don't have a greenbottle blue yet but I'd like to build a boneyard enclosure for one and it would be a shame if it webbed up the whole thing until there's nothing left to look at.
 

Ellenantula

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Well, I get you have aesthetics in mind -- but the enclosure will be the GBBs home -- it must meet her needs, not yours.
 

Ellenantula

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Yeah that's why I usually stay away from heavy webbers.
The only ways I can think of to reduce webbing would be limiting anchor points, and that would be cruel, imo.
A T needs to create its own environment to feel safe and secure. And you can't unteach ingrained behaviour in a T.
GBB is probably not the right fit for you (nor avics & OBTs).

webbing GBB1.jpg
 
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cold blood

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yeah, just limit anchor points. my female is housed in a sterilite bin with a short distance from lid to sub, and if i provided typical anchors, it would web the top closed.....she does have a thick mat of webbing throughout...but much less than you often see.
 

Ungoliant

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I don't have a greenbottle blue yet but I'd like to build a boneyard enclosure for one and it would be a shame if it webbed up the whole thing until there's nothing left to look at.
I can't necessarily guarantee the same results, but I filled one half of my GBB's container with anchor points and left the other half with bare substrate (and a water dish). He has webbed up all of the anchor points quite nicely but mostly leaves the water dish unwebbed.

The nice thing is that it also gives him a choice of where to be. Often he sits right out in the open on the bare side.
 

ledzeppelin

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Why are you all hating on webbing? :D I love how they web up stuff :D Much rather looking at webbing than a hole :D
 

kevinlowl

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I can't necessarily guarantee the same results, but I filled one half of my GBB's container with anchor points and left the other half with bare substrate (and a water dish). He has webbed up all of the anchor points quite nicely but mostly leaves the water dish unwebbed.

The nice thing is that it also gives him a choice of where to be. Often he sits right out in the open on the bare side.
Great idea. That's what I was thinking as well after reading the replies, a half webbed, half bare enclosure.
 

Ungoliant

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Why are you all hating on webbing? :D I love how they web up stuff :D Much rather looking at webbing than a hole :D
I love their webbing, but it's nice to get to see the tarantula too.

Many keepers, especially newer ones, don't just want a pet hole (or a pet web). GBBs are great for such keepers, because despite being webbers, they are often visible. (My Dolichothele diamantinensis, on the other hand, I only see because his webbed retreat is against the acrylic wall.)
 

kevinlowl

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Why are you all hating on webbing? :D I love how they web up stuff :D Much rather looking at webbing than a hole :D
Ambushing hole with legs > cluttered mess of webbing :D

But really though, webbers are cool, just don't over do it. I remember seeing a picture on here of someone's GBB enclosure and it had a skull in there with some twigs and the webbing was just the right amount, it was perfect.
 

Ellenantula

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I can't necessarily guarantee the same results, but I filled one half of my GBB's container with anchor points and left the other half with bare substrate (and a water dish). He has webbed up all of the anchor points quite nicely but mostly leaves the water dish unwebbed.
How dare you come into this thread and offer a perfectly logical solution of compromise? A pox on you dear lady! lol
Yeah -- if OP is determined to go GBB route -- this does sound like a win-win for T and keeper.

Honestly, while it's true mine has done an excessive amount of webbing -- she is still usually sitting topside and quite viewable. Gotta love a GBB. :)
 

mconnachan

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Is there anyway to do so? Like for example providing a certain level of substrate or a certain enclosure height to make them put down minimal webbing. I've seen enclosures where there is just the perfect amount of webbing to make a nice looking environment and others where there is literally nothing but webbing, which look unappealing imo.

I don't have a greenbottle blue yet but I'd like to build a boneyard enclosure for one and it would be a shame if it webbed up the whole thing until there's nothing left to look at.
That's what C.Cyanopubescens do, it's they're home, you like to feel comfy at home so do tarantulas, if you don't like the webbing, don't get that sp. It's what they're renowned for, I like it especially when there's a GBB on top of it...
 
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Ghost56

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A nice hide with some anchor points just within proximity of the hide should do the trick, basically what @Ungoliant said.
 

Walker253

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Maybe the GBB isn't for you and you need to pick a different species to fit your design plans. I'd venture to say 99% of the people acquiring a GBB do so knowing they are heavy webbers and looking forward to that web filled enclosure. The other 1% get the surprise. You aren't going to limit it, you may get lucky.
 

Graves6661

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Lol GBB will fine a way to web no matter how few anchor points you give. When my MM GBB was around he would manage to anchor webbing on the air holes on the side of his enclosure and build of that. By the time he kicked the bucket, he left an enclosure of white web. I found one of his first water dishes webbed up which I though he had buried so I just replaced it.
 

aphono

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Giving them a much bigger enclosure also helps. Bigger than you would for the typical terrestrial. That will also make it easier for you to leave half of it bare and still let it web to its content. But they do web over very large areas so, go really big not just a smidgen.

edit: it may be possible some the enclosures you saw with the preferred webbing were in the early-mid stages. It's not done... My recent rehouses(2 wks) might have about amount of webbing you prefer but they definitely are not done. It seems they web in bursts, some mornings there's visible patches and stretches of new webbing then mornings with no visible new webbing.
 
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Ellenantula

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Giving them a much bigger enclosure also helps. Bigger than you would for the typical terrestrial. That will also make it easier for you to leave half of it bare and still let it web to its content.
Granted mine has had 3 years to work on it ... but mine has webbed up her entire large sized enclosure. She did originally just pick the side her corkbark was on to concentrate her main webbing efforts. But today? Whole enclosure looks like a cotton candy floss machine. lol

OP: you can try the compromise of limiting anchor points, but don't be shocked if a heavy webber decides to, um, web heavily. They can use previously laid webbing to build up -- they can also make webbing stick to plain walls, sans anchor points.
Personally, I adore the webbing. Part of the joys of a GBB.
 
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mconnachan

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Maybe the GBB isn't for you and you need to pick a different species to fit your design plans. I'd venture to say 99% of the people acquiring a GBB do so knowing they are heavy webbers and looking forward to that web filled enclosure. The other 1% get the surprise. You aren't going to limit it, you may get lucky.
I don't own one but if I did and it didn't web up the enclosure like candyfloss I'd be disappointed, that's the appeal of a GBB, and of course their gorgeous colouration, from slings to adults, the metamorphosis is outstanding. Got to get one or 3 in the near future.
 

aphono

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Granted mine has had 3 years to work in it ... but mine has webbed up her entire large sized enclosure. She did eventually just pick the side her corkbark was on to concentrate her main webbing efforts. But today? Whole enclosure looks like a cotton candy floss machine. lol

OP: you can try the compromise of limiting anchor points, but don't be shocked if a heavy webber decides to, um, web heavily. They can use previously laid webbing to build up -- they can also make webbing stick to plain walls, sans anchor points.
Personally, I adore the webbing. Part of the joys of a GBB.
Yeah! Webbing was a huge selling point for me. Wanted a webber in my collection- the only other significant webber is the C. versicolor.

Curious- size of spider and enclosure? Rehoused an 1.5 inch into 6x8x2 inch enclosure. Kind of seemed too wide/long but did it deliberately so it could web and they have an easy time detecting prey anyways.... Hot glued fake succulents mostly into a corner, cork bark in the middle with one corner mostly bare for the water dish. It has already nicely webbed up the decorated corner and the water corner is still bare(so far.. ha!) I do wish the container was taller, because when it sits on top of cork bark or succulents, it is able to twist its abdomen and web the top a little bit. Oh well, learning experience. :rolleyes: I'd say it would even be fine in a much larger enclosure- be great for not having to rehouse down the road.... do most still hold to the body size vs enclosure length for GBB or give them much more leeway since their webs makes it so much easier for them to find prey?
 
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